Hurricanes take on Sabres

May 19th, 2006

The Carolina Hurricanes host the Buffalo Sabres tomorrow at 2 in their first game of the Eastern Conference Finals. The team\’s extended playoff run has stunned the experts, many of whom claimed the Hurricanes would be lucky to make the playoffs. The players, however, say those dismissive pre-season reports only motivated them to further success. Lorne Matalon reports from the RBC Center in Raleigh.

NC Voices: Rural Schools

May 19th, 2006

High Schools across North Carolina succeed or fail for many reasons. In rural school districts, the reasons for failure often have a lot to do with location. The biggest challenge for Northwest Halifax High School in Northeastern North Carolina is attracting experienced teachers. The school is in Littleton – far from major employers, banks or even big grocery stores. Some of the students have to travel more than an hour each way to get to school. And district leaders are under increasing pressure to raise standards and make sure students get the education they need. Leoneda Inge reports for our series “North Carolina Voices: Studying High School.”

Ethics and State Politics

May 18th, 2006

The State House has tentatively approved a new ethics package that is more stringent than current law. But it took hours of wrangling over what counts as a gift. Laura Leslie reports from the state capitol.

NC Voices: Advanced Placement

May 18th, 2006

What do teacher expectations have to do with student performance? When it comes to the achievement gap, perhaps a lot. An experiment at Mount Tabor High School in Winston-Salem has led the school to rethink how it places students into advanced level classes, and the experiment is now being exported to the county\’s nine other high schools. As part of our series \”North Carolina Voices: Studying High School\” Michelle Johnson reports.

NC Voices: Digame!

May 18th, 2006

North Carolina has more than 80 thousand students in schools across the state who are in the process of learning English. They\’re in every county and at every grade level. Many of the students have come here with their parents from Central and South America. Learning a new language in school seems almost effortless for younger students. But it\’s more complicated for kids in high school. Jessica Jones reports for our series \”North Carolina Voices: Studying High School.\”