Apollonius Dyscolus help

Discussion of Greek texts that do not fall into the other categories, including texts in other dialects or texts from other periods.
Forum rules
This is not a beginner's forum, competence in Greek is assumed.
Post Reply
Philip Arend
Posts: 37
Joined: October 14th, 2018, 1:15 am

Apollonius Dyscolus help

Post by Philip Arend »

I am working through a passage from "De compositione" from grammarian Apollonius Dyscolus who probably lived somewhere in the second century (AD). I'm unsure of these sentence constructions and any insights would be helpful. (This not any sort of homework, test or assignment)

Ἡ δὲ προκειμένη σύνταξις, κἂν σωματικῶς τὰ τῆς ἐνεργείας σημαίνῃ κἂν ἔτι ψυχικῶς, ὡς εἴπομεν, μιᾶς καὶ τῆς αὐτῆς συντάξεως ἔχεται.

The proposed (?) syntax, also if the activity it signifies is physical also if yet psychological, it has one and the same (?) syntax as we said.


καὶ ἐπεὶ πολλαχῶς ἔστι τὸ διατίθεσθαι, πλεῖστοι καὶ τρόποι παρακολουθήσουσι τῶν ῥημάτων κατὰ τὰς ἰδιότητας τῶν ἐνεργειῶν. – 160. εἰσὶ μὲν γὰρ σωματικαὶ διαθέσεις αἱ τοιαῦται,

And since the arranging is in many ways, most of ways follow from the verbs according to the individual nature of the actions. For those related to physical (bodily) actions have arrangement such as these:

<τρίβω σε, νίπτω σε, ῥήσσω σε, ἕλκω σε, βιάζομαι, χαλῶ, γυμνάζω, νύσσω, κνήθω, ξύω, σμῶ, βρέχω, τύπτω, παίω, λούω, δεσμεύω, λύω, πλήσσω, φονεύω, κτείνω, φθείρω, καίω, φλέγω, καθίζω, θερίζω, ζημιῶ, βλάπτω>.
“I rub you”, I wash you, I rip you, I pull you, I force, I loosen, I train, I pierce/stab, I scratch, I scrape, I wipe, I wet, I strike, I hit. I bathe, I chain, I unbind, I strike, I murder, I kill, I destroy, I burn, I scorch, I sit down, I harvest, I lose, I damage”.


καὶ σωματικῶς καὶ ψυχικῶς both physical and psychological.
<ὑβρίζω I>·I behave insolently/overbearingly

καὶ γὰρ καὶ διὰ χειρῶν καὶ ψυχικῆς διαθέσεως, καθὸ ἔχει καὶ
And therefore also through an evil (and) psychological description/composition, in so far as it has:

2.2.406.5 τὸ <λοιδορῶ> καὶ τὸ <κακολογῶ, ἀνιῶ, λυπῶ>.
That of “I ridicule” and that of “I slander, I afflict/torment (ἀνιάω), I pain and sadden,

καὶ ὅσα ἐπ' ἐγκωμίων, <ὑμνῶ σε, μεγαλύνω σε, ᾄδω, μέλπω, δοξάζω, κλείω>, ἀφ' οὗ καὶ τὸ κλέος, <αἰνῶ>.
And in so far as as for lauding [at a festival]:" I sing hymns (of) you, I magnify you, I sing praises, I celebrate in song, I glorify, I invoke you” (from which also (κλέος) fame, renown, glory, “I praise”

καὶ ἐπὶ τῶν διακρουστικῶν, <παραλογίζομαί σε, 2.2.407.1 κλέπτω, ἀπατῶ, περιγελῶ, παίζω, ἀπαφῶ, ἐξαπατῶ, πλανῶ>.
And for those expressing subterfuge or cunning: "I defraud/deceive you" I steal, I deceive, I laugh about/deride, I make fun of,
Barry Hofstetter
Posts: 2018
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: Apollonius Dyscolus help

Post by Barry Hofstetter »

Philip Arend wrote: April 26th, 2021, 10:08 am I am working through a passage from "De compositione" from grammarian Apollonius Dyscolus who probably lived somewhere in the second century (AD). I'm unsure of these sentence constructions and any insights would be helpful. (This not any sort of homework, test or assignment)

Ἡ δὲ προκειμένη σύνταξις, κἂν σωματικῶς τὰ τῆς ἐνεργείας σημαίνῃ κἂν ἔτι ψυχικῶς, ὡς εἴπομεν, μιᾶς καὶ τῆς αὐτῆς συντάξεως ἔχεται.

The proposed (?) syntax, also if the activity it signifies is physical also if yet psychological, it has one and the same (?) syntax as we said.
It's hard to see what help you need with no explicit questions. Never the less, προκειμένη could bear the sense of "present," i.e., that syntax currently under discussion. The rest of your rendering, if a bit awkward, seems accurate.

As for the rest, you cite some Greek text and your translations, but no questions, so nothing to address.

Also, helpful if you post what section and so forth, full references. I tracked down a text of De Constructione, and found your location, but I had to work harder than I like... :)
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.
Philip Arend
Posts: 37
Joined: October 14th, 2018, 1:15 am

Re: Apollonius Dyscolus help

Post by Philip Arend »

Point well taken, Barry. Thanks for putting in the extra effort. I will clarify questions and identify passages when seeking further help. Your suggestion for προκειμένη was quite helpful, ευχαριστω. :D
Post Reply

Return to “Other Greek Texts”