Two-termination Adjective in Tit 2,5?

Post Reply
Peter Streitenberger
Posts: 224
Joined: June 3rd, 2011, 10:45 am

Two-termination Adjective in Tit 2,5?

Post by Peter Streitenberger »

Dear Friends,

when we accept the NA reading in Tit 2,5 (OIKOURGOUS), then Paul builded a neologism. Which parts could be seperated and what are the roots of the compound word:
OIK- (house) is clear, but what is -OURGOS?
It must be a two-termination adjective as it's compound, or are there instances for compound forms without this building pattern?
Yours
Peter
Stephen Carlson
Posts: 3067
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: Two-termination Adjective in Tit 2,5?

Post by Stephen Carlson »

Peter Streitenberger wrote:when we accept the NA reading in Tit 2,5 (OIKOURGOUS), then Paul builded a neologism. Which parts could be seperated and what are the roots of the compound word:
OIK- (house) is clear, but what is -OURGOS?
I think the formation is οἶκος + ἔργον > *οἰκοεργός > οἰκουργός, with normal contraction of οε into ου.
Peter Streitenberger wrote:It must be a two-termination adjective as it's compound, or are there instances for compound forms without this building pattern?
Yes, it is a two-termination adjectival compound. It's not clear to me what you mean by "building pattern," though.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia
Peter Streitenberger
Posts: 224
Joined: June 3rd, 2011, 10:45 am

Re: Two-termination Adjective in Tit 2,5?

Post by Peter Streitenberger »

Dear Stephen,

is it clear at all that this word is a adjective or maybe rather a noun?
One German translation renders "good housekeepers".

As you wrote:
"I think the formation is οἶκος + ἔργον > *οἰκοεργός > οἰκουργός"

Are there other analog neologisms that use "ergon" as base ?

I wrote:
"It's not clear to me what you mean by "building pattern"
What I meant is, in which Declension class belong compound adjectives regurlarly - are they always two-termination ones?

Thank you !
Peter
Stephen Carlson
Posts: 3067
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: Two-termination Adjective in Tit 2,5?

Post by Stephen Carlson »

Peter Streitenberger wrote:is it clear at all that this word is a adjective or maybe rather a noun?
One German translation renders "good housekeepers".
The distinction between nouns and adjectives is pretty weak in Greek, because adjectives are readily substantivized into nouns with the article. You need to look for things like inflection for gender and degree. I wouldn't fault a translation for rendering the term with a noun.
Peter Streitenberger wrote:As you wrote:
"I think the formation is οἶκος + ἔργον > *οἰκοεργός > οἰκουργός"

Are there other analog neologisms that use "ergon" as base ?
Words like κακοῦργον come to mind.
Peter Streitenberger wrote:I wrote:
"It's not clear to me what you mean by "building pattern"
What I meant is, in which Declension class belongs compound adjectives regurlarly - are they always two-termination ones?
I think that compound adjectives are often, even usually, two-termination. I don't have the resources at hand to determine if they are always so. (Since we're dealing with language, qualifications like "always" are problematic.)
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia
Peter Streitenberger
Posts: 224
Joined: June 3rd, 2011, 10:45 am

Re: Two-termination Adjective in Tit 2,5?

Post by Peter Streitenberger »

Dear Stephen,

very interesting ! Thank you !

You wrote:
>Words like κακοῦργον come to mind.
The difference between KAKOURGOS and OIKOURGOS (NA in Tit 2,5) seems to be that the first part of the word is once an adjective (KAKOS) and once a Noun (OIKOS).

Maybe this base offers both possibilities.
Yours
Peter, Germany
Jason Hare
Posts: 743
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 5:28 pm
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel
Contact:

Re: Two-termination Adjective in Tit 2,5?

Post by Jason Hare »

Stephen Carlson wrote:Words like κακοῦργον come to mind.
I immediately thought of αὐτουργός (that is, αὐτο- + ἔργο > αὐτοεργο-) from the stories about Dicaeopolis in Athenaze. :)

We can see this in ἀγαθουργῶ (ἀγαθουργέω), too, where the ἀγαθο- root contracts with the ἐργο- root.

It's common, just as you stated.
Jason A. Hare
Tel Aviv, Israel
Post Reply

Return to “Other”