Lighthouses of Canada: Western Nova Scotia

The nation of Canada was created by the British North America Act in 1867 with Ontario, Québec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia as the four original provinces.

Nova Scotia is the province at the extreme southeastern corner of Canada. The southern and eastern parts of the province lie on a peninsula facing the Atlantic to the east and the Bay of Fundy to the west. To the north the peninsula is joined to the rest of Canada by an isthmus that separates the Bay of Fundy on the south from Northumberland Strait and the Gulf of St. Lawrence on the north. Cape Breton Island lies to the northeast, separated from the main part of the province by the narrow Strait of Canso.

In the 17th century Nova Scotia was called Acadia as a part of New France, the French empire in North America. Britain conquered Acadia in 1710 during Queen Anne's War and established the Nova Scotia colony in the peninsula. Cape Breton Island continued as a French colony until it was also conquered by Britain in 1758 during the Seven Years War (1756-63).

For its size Nova Scotia has an extraordinarily long coastline and a very large number of lighthouses, roughly 170 in all. The Directory covers these lighthouses on five pages. This page lists lighthouses of the west coast of the peninsula, which faces the Bay of Fundy in the counties of Digby, Annapolis, Kings, Hants, Colchester, and Cumberland. (Colchester and Cumberland County lighthouses on the Strait of Northumberland are listed on the Northwestern Nova Scotia page.) Annapolis, Kings, Colchester, and Cumberland are organized as regional municipalities, while Digby and Hants are subdivided into district municipalities.

The funnel-shaped Bay of Fundy is famous for its extreme tidal ranges, including the highest ranges in the world.

Rip Irwin's book, Lighthouses and Lights of Nova Scotia (Halifax: second edition, Nimbus Publishing, 2011) is an essential reference for understanding these lighthouses.

Aids to navigation in Canada are maintained by the Canadian Coast Guard. In 2008 Parliament passed the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act to designate and protect historic lighthouses. In addition local preservation groups are active throughout Nova Scotia and the Nova Scotia Lighthouse Preservation Society is the largest and most active organization of its kind in Canada.

CCG numbers are from the Atlantic Coast volume of the List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from Volume H of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 110.

General Sources
Nova Scotia Lighthouse Preservation Society
This outstanding web site has a wealth of photos, information, and news.
Nova Scotia Canada Lighthouses
Excellent photos plus historical and visitor information from Kraig Anderson's LighthouseFriends.com web site.
Lighthouses in Nova Scotia, Canada
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Nova Scotia
Lighthouse photos from visits by C.W. Bash in 2008.
Lighthouses in Nova Scotia
Photos available from Wikimedia; included is a large collection of photos by Dennis Jarvis (several appear on this page).
World of Lighthouses - Canada Atlantic Coast
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Leuchttürme an der kanadischen Ostküste
Photos of Nova Scotia lighthouses taken in 2004 by Bernd Claußen.
Lighthouses of Nova Scotia
Historic images from Nova Scotia Archives.
Online List of Lights - Canada
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas. Many of the photos for this area are by Klaus Potschien or by C.W. Bash.
Leuchttürme Kanadas auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.
List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals
Official Canadian light lists.
GPSNauticalCharts
Navigation chart for the Bay of Fundy.
Navionics Charts
Navigation chart for the Bay of Fundy.

Gilbert's Cove Light
Gilbert's Cove Light, Gilbert's Cove, December 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by walknboston

Brier Island Light
Brier Island Light, Brier Island, August 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis

Digby County Lighthouses

Clare Municipal District (St. Mary's Bay) Lighthouses
* Cape St. Mary (Cap Sainte-Marie) (2)
1969 (station established 1868). Active; focal plane 31.5 m (104 ft); white flash every 5 s. 8.5 m (28 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery attached to a corner of a 1-story square fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Fog horn (4 s blast every 60 s). A photo by Jarvis is at right, Trabas has Potschien's photo, Lighthouse Digest has Bob Crawford's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Brian Merrill has a street view, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse received federal heritage designation in September 2016. In July 2017 the Municipality of Clare took ownership of the lighthouse. The town has restored the exterior of the light as the centerpiece of a municipal park; in August 2017 the federal government announced a grant of $83,000 to support the project. The park opened in July 2018. The original lighthouse here was a 13 m (43 ft) octagonal wood tower. Located at the end of Cape St. Mary's Road off NS 1 in Mavillette, marking the east side of the entrance to St. Mary's Bay. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Municipality of Clare (Cape St. Mary Lighthouse Park ). ARLHS CAN-111; CCG A-241; Admiralty H3848; NGA 10792.
* [Meteghan Breakwater (3?)]
Date unknown (around 2012; station established 1925). Active; focal plane about 7 m (23 ft); red light, 2 s on, 4 s off. 5 m (17 ft) square skeletal tower; the upper half of the tower carries a slatted daymark painted with a red band above a white band. Trabas has Klaus Wolfgang's photo, Dan Robichaud has a street view and and the light is barely visible in Google's satellite view. A photo from the 1920s shows the original lighthouse, a square skeletal tower with lantern, gallery, and enclosed upper portion. It was replaced in 1976 by a small skeletal tower. (Special thanks to Michel Forand for his research on Meteghan lighthouses.) Located at the end of the main breakwater at Meteghan. Site open, tower closed. CCG A-239.5; Admiralty H3851; NGA 10804.

Cape Saint Mary Light, Mavillette, April 2018
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
* [Meteghan River (4?)]
Date unknown (station established 1875). Active; focal plane 7.5 m (25 ft); white flash every 4 s. 5.5 m (18 ft) triangular skeletal mast. Google has a street view but the small light is hard to find in Google's satellite view. The original lighthouse was carried away by a winter storm in 1947; it was found in ruins half a mile from its station. It was replaced by a post and later by a skeletal tower with enclosed lower portion. Clare Township has a distant view of the 1875 lighthouse. Located near the base of the south breakwater at the entrance to Meteghan River. Site open, tower closed. CCG A-238; Admiralty H3852; NGA 10808.
** Church Point (Pointe de l'Église) (replica)
2017 replica of 1874 lighthouse. Original lighthouse inactive since 1984 and destroyed in 2014. This was a 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white with red trim; the lantern was red. The keeper's cottage, formerly attached, was demolished around 1953. A 2008 photo of the original lighthouse is available, and Google has a 2012 street view and a satellite view. This lighthouse was formerly endangered by lack of maintenance. After it was deactivated the lighthouse was transferred to the Université Sainte-Anne, Nova Scotia's only French-language university. Some restoration work was done. Much more needed to be done, but then the lighthouse was destroyed by hurricane-force winds in the nor'easter of 27 March 2014. The Swallowtail Keepers Society posted a photo of the ruins (fourth photo on the page). In 2016-17 the University built a replica of the lighthouse and the attached keeper's house. Fred Anderson has a 2021 photo and the Petit Bois Trail Network has a page for the replica lighthouse with photos and visitor information. Managed by the Biology Department, the building is used it as a research center for bird-banding activities and other nature studies by students. In all honesty the replica is not that similar to the original; instead of a lantern the light tower carries a square observation room. Located at the end of the Chemin du Phare off NS 1 in Pointe de l'Église (Church Point). Site open, building open weekdays and occasionally on weekends during the summer months at least. Site manager: Université Sainte-Anne. ARLHS CAN-138.
* Belliveau Cove (replica)
1980s replica of 1889 lighthouse. Active (privately maintained since 1993); focal plane 6 m (20 ft); white light, 2.5 s on, 2.5 s off. 6.5 m (21 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Jarvis's photo is at right, Trabas has Potschien's photo, Bash has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Dan Robichaud has a closeup 2016 street view, and Google has a satellite view. The historic lighthouse was destroyed by erosion during a storm in 1973; local residents built the replica and activated it as a private aid. The wharf and lighthouse are located in Joseph and Marie Dugas Municipal Park. Located at the end of the wharf at L'Anse-des-Belliveau (Belliveau Cove), off NS 1. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Municipality of L'Anse-des-Belliveau. . ARLHS CAN-030; CCG A-234; Admiralty H3859.
Belliveau Cove Light
Belliveau Cove Light, L'Anse-des-Belliveau, July 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
**** Gilbert's Cove (Gilbert Point)
1904. Inactive since 1975; a decorative light is displayed. 11.5 m (38 ft) square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery, centered on the roof of a 2-story wood keeper's house. Building painted white with red trim. 6th order Fresnel lens. A photo is at the top of this page, Jarvis has an excellent photo, Ron Pettitt has a 2008 closeup, Davy Ray has a street view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The Gilbert Cove and District Historical Society was formed in 1982 to lease and restore the abandoned lighthouse. Since 1984 the preservation group has operated a small museum, gift shop, and tea room in the lighthouse. Located at the end of Lighthouse Road, on the west side of the entrance to Gilbert's Cove. Site and tower open daily mid June through mid September (free, donations welcome). Accessible by an unpaved road; watch for the entrance from the Evangeline Trail highway. Parking provided. Site manager: Gilbert Cove and District Historical Society (Gilberts Cove Lighthouse . ARLHS CAN-200.

Digby Municipal District: Brier Island and Long Island Lighthouses
Behind the western shore of Nova Scotia is North Mountain, a long ridge that extends through the Digby Neck peninsula and continues southwestward as Long Island and Brier Island. The two islands are separated by a strait called the Grand Passage, while Long Island is separated from Digby Neck by the Petit Passage. Long Island is about 15 km (9 mi) long, and Brier Island is about 7.5 km (4.5 mi) long. Ferries cross both straits to connect the islands to the mainland, and NS 217 runs the lengths of both islands.

*
Brier Island (Western Point) (3)
1944 (station established 1809). Active; focal plane 29 m (95 ft); three white flashes every 18 s. 18 m (60 ft) octagonal pyramidal concrete tower with flared top, lantern and gallery, painted with horizontal red and white bands; lantern is red. Fog horn (two 3 s blasts every 60 s). Jarvis's photo is at the top of this page, Wikimedia has several photos, Bash has a 2008 photo, Trabas also has Bash's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Matz von Finckenstein has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The second oldest light station of southwestern Nova Scotia, this light marks a severe tide rip at the southern entrance to the Bay of Fundy. The original wood lighthouse was so poorly constructed it had to be rebuilt around 1830; the replacement stood until it burned in 1944. The light station is a popular site for whale watching. A preservation group, Save an Island Lighthouse 2 (SAIL2) has been formed to work for preservation and restoration of the Peter Island and Brier Island lighthouses. In November 2021 the lighthouse was designated as a Heritage Lighthouse. Located at the western point of the island (and the westernmost point of Nova Scotia), at the end of a gravel road off Wellington Street on Brier Island. Parking provided (there's a short uphill walk to the lighthouse). Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. . ARLHS CAN-059; CCG A-223; Admiralty H3872; NGA 10844.
* Grand Passage (2)
1965 (station established 1901). Active; focal plane 14.5 m (47 ft); white flash every 10 s. 8.5 m (28 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a corner of a 1-story square fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Fog horn (3 s blast every 30 s). Two 1-story Coast Guard buildings. A historic fog bell from this lighthouse is on display at the post office in Digby. A photo by Jarvis is at right, Jarvis has another 2009 photo, Bash has a 2008 photo, Valerie Killeen has a 2019 photo, Trabas also has Bash's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The caption to Dennis Kent's photo says that the present lighthouse was built in 1965 and the original one was demolished in 1968. The light marks the northwestern entrance into the Grand Passage, which separates Brier Island from Long Island. In November 2021 the lighthouse was designated as a Heritage Lighthouse. Located at the north point of Brier Island, at the end of a gravel road off Water Street in Westport. The island is accessible by ferries on NS 217 from Digby Neck. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. . ARLHS CAN-206; CCG A-221; Admiralty H3874; NGA 10852.
Peter Island (Peter's Island, Westport) (2)
1909 (station established 1850). Inactive since 2014. 12.5 m (41 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. Fog horn (2 s blast every 20 s). Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Jarvis's 2009 photo showed the lighthouse in urgent need of paint. Critically endangered; a summer 2013 photo shows the poor condition of the tower and it looks terrible in a 2019 photo. The light failed in December 2014 and the Coast Guard decided their crews could not fix it because of mold in the tower. The light (focal plane about 10 m (33 ft); green light, 2 s on, 4 s off) is now shown from a small skeletal tower; Trabas has Klaus Wolfgang's photo. A preservation group, Save an Island Lighthouse 2 (SAIL2) , has been formed to work for preservation and restoration of the Peter Island and Brier Island lighthouses. In November 2021 the lighthouse was designated as a Heritage Lighthouse. Located on an island just off Westport, the principal town of Brier Island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-374. Active light: CCG A-227; Admiralty H3878; NGA 10872.

Grand Passage Light, Westport, August 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
* Boar's Head (2)
1957 (station established 1864). Active; focal plane 18 m (60 ft); white flash every 5 s. 10.5 m (35 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s). The foundation of the original lighthouse can be seen a few feet from the present tower. Catherine Kuenlin has a 2021 photo, Ron Pettitt has a good 2007 photo, Bash has a 2008 photo (also seen at right), Trabas also has Bash's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The light marks the northern entrance to the Petit Passage between Long Island and the mainland. In September 2009 Fisheries and Oceans crews carried out a $216,000 cleanup of soil around the lighthouse contaminated by lead paint chips. In October 2014 the Municipality of Digby agreed to take ownership of the lighthouse. The lighthouse received heritage designation in 2015. The Coast Guard repainted and refurbished the lighthouse in 2016, as seen in Craig Rutkowske's photo. Later in 2016 ownership was transferred to the municipality. The Tiverton and Central Grove Historical Association is managing the light station; in February 2015 it received a grant of $22,000 from Heritage Canada's Runciman Fund to repaint and repair the building. A monument to honor former keepers was unveiled in September 2018. Located at the northeastern end of Long Island, at the end of a road leading from the ferry terminal; a short walk is needed from a gate on the road. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Municipality of Digby. Site manager: Tiverton and Central Grove Historical Association . ARLHS CAN-047; CCG A-216; Admiralty H3884; NGA 10880.

Boar's Head Light, Tiverton, July 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash

Digby Municipal District: Digby Area Lighthouses
The next six lighthouses guide vessels in the Annapolis Basin, a 25 km (15 mi) long inlet separated from the Bay of Fundy by North Mountain. The Digby Gut connects the Bay of Fundy to the Annapolis Basin through a gap in the mountain range. The narrow Gut is dangerous to navigate; it experiences tidal currents of up to 5 knots (2.5 m/s) and transient eddies and whirlpools.

* Prim Point (Point Prim) (4)
1964 (station established 1804). Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 14 m (46 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to the northeast corner of a 1-story square fog signal building. Tower painted with vertical red and white stripes; lantern is red. Fog horn (3 s blast every 30 s). Doug Kerr's photo is at right, a 2021 photo is available, Jarvis has a 2010 closeup photo, another good photo is available, Trabas has Potschien's photo, Bash has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. A webcam shows the view from the lighthouse. Officially this is the Prim Point Light, but nearly everyone calls it Point Prim. (Note: there is also a Point Prim lighthouse in Prince Edward Island.) The first lighthouse burned in 1808 after only four years of service, and the second (1817) lighthouse burned in March 1873. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the third (1874) lighthouse, which was demolished in 1964 by bulldozing it over the cliff. A support group, the Friends of Point Prim, took over maintenance of the lighthouse in 2011 and received a $30,000 grant from Heritage Canada’s Runciman Fund in 2012. The Friends installed a new parking area and trail system and repainted the lighthouse in 2013. The Municipality of Digby agreed to take ownership of the lighthouse in October 2014 and the station was recognized as a Heritage Lighthouse in 2015. Ownership was finally transferred in August 2016. The lighthouse stands on the south side of the entrance to Digby Gut, an opening in the Digby Neck ridge that leads to the Annapolis Basin. There's a good view from ferries sailing between Digby and St. John, New Brunswick. Located at the end of Lighthouse Road, off NS 303 northwest of Digby. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Municipality of Digby (Point Prim Lighthouse). Site manager: Friends of Point Prim . ARLHS CAN-391; CCG A-201; Admiralty H3890; NGA 10908.
Prim Point Light
Prim Point Light, Digby, September 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Doug Kerr
Digby Pier (Digby Wharf) (2) (relocated)
1903 (station established 1887). Inactive since the 1970s. 8 m (26 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Originally this lighthouse stood on the ferry wharf at Digby. It was deactivated in the 1970s and relocated ito St. John, New Brunswick, first to the Coast Guard base and then in 1983 to a location on the downtown waterfront. Neal Doan has a 2004 photo of the lighthouse at St. John. City officials in Digby mounted a campaign to get it back. In September 2012 the cities of St. John and Digby reached agreement to move the lighthouse back home and the following month the lighthouse was shipped by ferry across the Bay of Fundy. In July 2015 the lighthouse won $15,000 in the National Trust Lighthouse Matters competition and restoration of the lighthouse began soon after. The restored lighthouse was installed in June 2016 and dedicated on July 23. A 2019 photo is at right, Lightphotos.net has Jarvis's photo, Priska Walker has a photo of the restored lighthouse, and Google has a satellite view. The original light was a lantern on a pole standing beside a small shed; a historic photo is available. Located on the Digby waterfront at the foot of Church Street, across from the post office. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Municipality of Digby. . ARLHS CAN-725.
* Bear River (Winchester Point, Smith's Cove)
1905. Inactive since 2001. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern, painted white. Jarvis has a 2009 photo, Bash has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. This light marked the entrance to the Bear River, which here forms the border between Digby and Annapolis Counties. Local volunteers of the Bear River Lighthouse Society have worked to maintain the lighthouse and a trail that provides access to it. In December 2009 the Digby municipal council agreed to take ownership of the lighthouse with the Society to manage it. However, the transfer of ownership was long delayed. Meanwhile the lighthouse was recognized as a Heritage Lighthouse in 2015. In 2021 ownership was finally transferred and in 2022 the Smith's Cove Historical Society began work to restore the lighthouse, creating a park to surround it. Located at the end of a dirt road off exit 24 of NS 101, southeast of Digby. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Municipality of Digby. Site manager: Smith's Cove Historical Society . ARLHS CAN-027; ex-CCG A-208; ex-Admiralty H3904; ex-NGA 10932.

Digby Wharf Light, Digby, September 2019
Google Maps photo by Petra MS

Annapolis County Municipality Lighthouses

Annapolis Royal Area Lighthouses
Founded in the 1630s, Annapolis Royal (called Port Royal under French rule) was the capital of French Acadia until it was captured by British troops in 1710. It continued as the capital of British Nova Scotia until Halifax was founded in 1749. Today it is a small town and tourist attraction with a population of about 500.
* Annapolis (Annapolis Royal)
1889. Active (privately maintained); focal plane 9 m (30 ft); continuous red light. 8.5 m (28 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. The lighthouse is used as a visitor center for the historic town, founded by the French in 1630. Bash's 2008 photo is at right, a 2009 photo is available, Trabas has Potschien's closeup photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The local historical association purchased the lighthouse in 2004. In 2015 the lighthouse won $40,000 in the National Trust Lighthouse Matters competition, and those funds supported a restoration in 2016. Located at the end of St. George Street (NS 8) on the waterfront of Annapolis Royal. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator/site manager: Historical Association of Annapolis Royal . ARLHS CAN-013; CCG A-211; Admiralty H3908; NGA 10944.
* Schafner Point (Port Royal)
1885. Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); continuous white light. 11 m (36 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Bash has a 2008 photo, Trabas also has Bash's photo, Jeff Rouse has a 2017 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse is a short distance west of the Port Royal National Historic Site, the location of the first French settlement in Canada (1605). The Annapolis Heritage Society took ownership of the lighthouse in 2015. In 2019 the Society began reshingling the lighthouse, but work stalled when the tower was found to be in much worse condition than expected. After several years of inaction a new group, the Port Royal Lighthouse Association, assumed ownership in October 2022. Fundraising began and restoration is planned for 2023. Located off Granville Road just west of Port Royal and about 15 km (9 mi) southwest of Annapolis Royal. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Port Royal Lighthouse Association . ARLHS CAN-452; CCG A-210; Admiralty H3906; NGA 10940.
* Victoria Beach
1901. Inactive since 2015. 8 m (26 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Tina Boutilier has a 2021 photo, Scott Baljes has a closeup, Bash has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. This abandoned lighthouse is likely to become endangered. Located on the east side of Digby Gut at the end of Victoria Beach Road. Easily visible from the road, but it may be necessary to cross private property to actually reach the lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-511; ex-CCG A-203; ex-Admiralty H3894; ex-NGA 10920.
#Digby Gut Fog Signal
1915 (light added in 1963). Demolished in 2014. This was a 7 m (22 ft) post mounted at one end of a 1-story rectangular fog signal building. Trabas has Potschien's closeup photo and Bing has a satellite view. In 2014 the building was demolished and replaced by a 4 m (13 ft) square skeletal tower carrying a daymark colored green with a white horizontal band (focal plane 20 m (66 ft); green light, 2 s on, 4 s off). Thorsten Münch has a view of the new light from the bay. Located on the east side of the entrance to Digby Gut, opposite Prim Point. Site and tower closed (surrounded by private property). Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-159. Active light: CCG A-202; Admiralty H3892; NGA 10916.
Annapolis Light
Annapolis Light, Annapolis Royal, July 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo copyright C.W. Bash

Upper Bay of Fundy Lighthouses
* [Parker Cove (Parkers Cove) (4?)]
Date unknown (station established 1909). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); green light, 2 s on, 10 s off. 8 m (26 ft) mast. Lei Chen has a photo, and the mast is visible in Marinas.com's aerial photos but not in Google's satellite view. The original lighthouse, a square wood tower, was demolished in the late 1950s; a series of post or masts have been in place since then. Located on the east breakwater at Parkers Cove. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-1208; CCG A-199; Admiralty H3916; NGA 10948.
*** Hampton (Chutes Cove)
1911. Active (privately maintained); focal plane 21 m (69 ft); continuous white light. 10 m (33 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; the original 6th order Fresnel lens is in use. A 2021 photo is available, Jarvis has a photo, Trabas has Rainer Arndt's closeup photo, Bash has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Since 2001 the lighthouse has been owned, maintained and operated by the Hampton Lighthouse Society. Located on hill above the waterfront at Hampton near Bridgetown off NS 1. Site open, tower open weekends and holidays June through mid September. Owner/operator/site manager: Hampton Lighthouse and Historical Society . ARLHS CAN-222; CCG A-198; Admiralty H3918; NGA 10952.
[Port Lorne (Port Williams, Marshalls Cove) (1)]
1859. Inactive since about 1915. 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house, painted white. The house is sunlit at the upper left in Joe Dell'Orfano's photo of the harbor. The light was displayed from a square wood tower adjoining the house. It is not known when this lighthouse was removed. The light was moved to a skeletal tower and later to a skeletal mast but it was discontinued in 2016. Bing has an indistinct satellite view. Located on a bluff on the east side of Port Lorne Harbour. Site status unknown (private property). ARLHS CAN-1210. Most recent light: ex-CCG A-197; ex-Admiralty H3920; NGA 10956.
* Port George (1?)
1888 (rebuilt in the 1930s?). Officially inactive since 1999 but an unofficial red light is displayed. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Jarvis's photo is at right, Bash has a 2008 closeup, Rolf Hicker has a page for the lighthouse, Scott Baltjes has a good photo, Ron Kapchinsky has a closeup photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. This little lighthouse was moved three times early in its life before reaching its present location in the 1930s. All sources state that it is the original, but if so it must have been modified by adding its lantern and gallery. A preservation group was formed in 1997 and took ownership of the lighthouse in May 2002. The group has restored the tower and continued to maintain it; in 2016 volunteers replaced shingles, repaired the roof and repainted the tower. Located at Port George Harbour off NS 362. Owner/site manager: Friends of Port George Lighthouse . ARLHS CAN-406.
Port George Light
Port George Light, Port George, July 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
* Margaretsville (Margaretville)
1859. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); white light, 10 s on, 3 s off, 4 s on, 3 s off. 7 m (22 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery painted white with a black horizontal band. Loc Le has a 2021 photo, Jarvis has a 2011 closeup photo, Bash has a foggy 2008 photo, Trabas also has Bash's photo, Mike Millard has a 2016 street view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse has been altered several times over the years. The 150th anniversary of the lighthouse was celebrated in October 2009. In June 2013 the Friends of the Margaretsville Lighthouse Society was formed to seek ownership of the lighthouse. Volunteers from the painters union repainted the lighthouse in October 2015. In 2018 the Society signed a lease of the lighthouse from the Coast Guard. Located on a promontory, across from Community Hall, off NS 362 in Margaretsville. Parking nearby. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Friends of the Margaretsville Lighthouse Society . ARLHS CAN-306; CCG A-195; Admiralty H3926; NGA 10964.

Kings County Municipality Lighthouses

Most of the remaining lighthouses of this page are on the Minas Basin, a long inlet at the northeastern corner of the Bay of Fundy. The basin is known for its exceptional tides -- including the highest tidal ranges in the world -- and its powerful tidal currents.

*
[Harbourville (5?)]
Date unknown (station established 1913). Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); red flash every 4 s. 6.5 m (21 ft) square skeletal tower carrying a red and white daymark. Trabas has Klaus Wolfgang's photo, the light is near the left edge of Laszlo Podor's photo of the harbor, and Bing has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was a square wood tower. It was deactivated by 1930 but retained as a daybeacon until it was finally demolished in 1961. Several masts and skeletal towers have been in place since then. Located on the west breakwater at Harbourville. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-630; CCG A-194; Admiralty H3930; NGA 10972.
* Black Rock (2)
1967 (station established 1848). Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); two white flashes, separated by 2 s, every 10 s. 10 m (34 ft) slender fiberglass tower without lantern, painted white with two narrow horizontal red bands. Not to be confused with the Black Rock Point Light on Great Bras d'Or Lake (see the Cape Breton Island page). Ruins of the original 2-1/2 story wood lighthouse are reported to be visible here. Linda Keddy has a 2022 photo, Jarvis has a photo, Trabas has Potschien's photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the Minas Channel near Grafton. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-042; CCG A-193; Admiralty H3932; NGA 10976.
* Borden Wharf (Bordens Wharf, Canning) (relocated)
1904. Inactive since the early 1930s (a decorative light has been displayed since 2004). 6 m (20 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Jarvis's photo is at right, Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Jordan Crowe has a photo, Lighthouse Digest has a recent photo by Bob Crawford, a 2007 photo is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. In 1959 the inactive lighthouse was sold to a local farmer, who removed the lantern and moved the building to his farm to house pigs. In 1980 it was sold and relocated a second time, this time to be used as a toolshed. In 1990 the village of Canning took over the lighthouse and fixed it up as an information center. The building has now been donated to the Fieldwood Heritage Society, which has restored the lighthouse and replaced the lantern. Partial funding was provided by the Kaplan Fund. In June 2003 the lighthouse was relocated once more, to its permanent home. The restoration and relighting of the lighthouse was celebrated on 4 September 2004. Located on the Habitant River in Canning, a town on the southwestern shore of the Minas Basin north of Wolfville. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Village of Canning. Site manager: Fieldwood Heritage Society (Canning Lighthouse ). ARLHS CAN-072.
Bordens Wharf Light
Bordens Wharf Light, Canning, September 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
* Horton Bluff (Range Front) (3)
1961 (station established 1851). Inactive since 2013. 9 m (29 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to one corner of a 1-story fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white with a broad red vertical stripe marking the range line. Fog horn (3 s blast every 30 s). 1-story keeper's house (1960s). The rear range light is on a short skeletal tower. Jarvis's photo is at the bottom of this page, Rose Eddy has a 2010 closeup, a 2007 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse burned in April 1883. Is replacement was demolished in 1961 at the time the range was established. The present lighthouse and the rear range light were deactivated in 2013. Located at the end of Lighthouse Road, marking the west entrance to the Avon River near Avonport, about 7 km (4 mi) northwest of Hantsport. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. . ARLHS CAN-231; ex-CCG A-188; ex-Admiralty H3968; ex-NGA 11012.
Horton Bluff (2) (replica)
2011 replica of 1883 lighthouse. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery attached to a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's cottage. Tower and house painted white, lantern red. This is a faithful replica, based on the original plans with minor alterations to meet modern building codes, built by Raye Myles. Google has a satellite view. Located off Bluff Road about 3 km (1.8 mi) southeast of the original site. Site and tower closed (private property).

Hants County Lighthouses

East Hants Municipal District Lighthouses
Mitchener Point (2)
1972 (station established 1908). Inactive since 2001. 10 m (33 ft) round fiberglass tower, colored red with two narrow white horizontal bands. Jordan Crowe has a closeup photo, Wikimedia has a 2011 photo by Dennis Jarvis, and Bing has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was a square wood tower. Located on a bluff on the west side of the Avon River estuary about 4 km (2.5 mi) southeast of Hantsport. Visible from Lighthouse Road (a private drive, but ungated). Site and tower closed (private property). ARLHS CAN-323.
*** Walton Harbour
1872. Inactive since 1978. 8.5 m (28 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. A closeup 2021 photo is available, Jarvis's photo is at right, there's a web page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The Municipality of East Hants acquired the inactive lighthouse in 1991 and restored it as a historical museum. Located on the south shore of the Minas Basin at the end of Lorne Smith Road, off NS 215 in Walton. Site open, tower open daily early May to mid October (donation requested). Owner/site manager: Municipality of East Hants (Walton Lighthouse ). ARLHS CAN-519.
*** Burntcoat Head (2) (replica)
1995 replica of 1913 lighthouse. Station established 1859, inactive since the mid 1970s. Octagonal lantern and gallery centered on the roof of a square 2-story wood keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white, light tower and lantern red. Christina Vandervlist has a 2021 photo, Jarvis's photo is at the bottom of this page, Doug Mercer has a photo, and Google has a street view and a distant satellite view. The building houses a museum. The original lighthouse was deactivated and demolished in 1972. It was replaced by a skeletal tower, which was deactivated several years later. The replica was built in 1994 from the original blueprints. This location is famous for the world's highest tides; the record tidal range is some 16.5 m (54 ft). Located on the south shore of the Minas Basin on Burntcoat Head Loop Road, off NS 215. The park and lighthouse were closed for renovations in 2015 but they reopened for the 2016 summer season. Site open, lighthouse and tower open daily mid May to mid October (donation requested). Owner/site manager: Municipality of East Hants (Burntcoat Head Park ). ARLHS CAN-064.

Walton Harbour Light, East Hants, September 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis

Colchester County Municipality Lighthouses

Bass River
1907. Inactive since 1992. 10 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story wood residence. Buick Belliveau is a 2019 photo, Doug Mercer has a good photo, Jarvis has a photo, and Google has a distant satellite view. Originally this was a free-standing tower. In 1994 the lighthouse was sold and the new owner built a summer home around three sides of the tower. Located at the end of Wharf Road at the mouth of the Bass River, about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) south of the village of the same name. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-023; ex-Admiralty H4022.
* Five Islands (relocated)
1913. Inactive since 1993. 10 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Doug Kerr's photo is at right, Jarvis has a 2011 closeup, Davy Ray has a 2016 street view, Claußen has photos, a 2007 sunset photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was moved back from the shore in 1952 and again in 1957 to escape rapid erosion. It was about to be lost to erosion in 1996 when it was purchased by the county and relocated a third time, a move of about 60 meters (200 ft) to the Sand Point Campground. In 2008 the campground went bankrupt and the lighthouse had to be moved a fourth time. Supporters raised $5000 and Colchester County contributed the rest of the funds needed to move the lighthouse in November 2008 to what is now Five Islands Lighthouse Park, a then-undeveloped tract donated to the county in 2005. There is now a small visitor center and gift shop. Michel Forand found the lighthouse being prepared for painting in June 2009. The 100th anniversary of the lighthouse was celebrated in July 2013. The interior of the lighthouse was closed in 2019 due to detrioration of the ladder leading to the gallery. Located at the end of Broderick Lane in Five Islands, off NS 2. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Municipality of the County of Colchester (Five Islands Lighthouse Park ). Site manager: Five Islands Lighthouse Preservation Society. ARLHS CAN-179; ex-Admiralty H4028.

Five Islands Light, Parrsboro, October 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Doug Kerr

Cumberland County Municipality Lighthouses

Cumberland County spans the isthmus connecting Nova Scotia to New Brunswick. Lighthouses on the county's northern coast are described on the Northwestern Nova Scotia page.

Minas Basin and Minas Channel Lighthouses

Parrsboro (4)
1980 (station established 1852). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); continuous green light. 6.5 m (21 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to one corner of a 1-story fog signal building. Fog horn (3 s blast every 30 s). Lighthouse painted white; lantern is red. Bash has a 2008 photo, Trabas also has Bash's photo, Claußen has closeup photos, J.J. Linkletter has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The original lighthouse, a fine octagonal wood tower, was lost to beach erosion in 1945, although the keeper's house remained for many years. The light was shown from a post and then from a skeletal tower behind the house. Located on Partridge Island at the entrance to Parrsboro Harbour, on the north side of the Minas Basin. Endangered by lack of maintenance and rising sea level. In 2014 the Parrsboro Lighthouse Society was formed to work for the preservation of the lighthouse. In 2018 the Coast Guard removed the lantern for restoration. In 2019 a new roof was installed and a Coast Guard helicopter returned the restored lantern. By the end of the year the interior had been gutted in preparation for restoration in 2020. Restoration is continuing. Accessible by boat. In principle the lighthouse is accessible by walking a lengthy breakwater from the end of Wharf Street in Parrsboro. However, it's a tough scramble over the large boulders near the lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Parrsboro Lighthouse Society . ARLHS CAN-364; CCG A-172; Admiralty H3952; NGA 11044.
* Cape Sharp (2)
1973 (station established 1886). Active; focal plane 18 m (60 ft); white light, 7 s on, 3 s off. 10.5 m (35 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Fog horn (4 s blast every 60 s) in 1-story wood fog signal building. Jarvis's photo is at right, a 2021 photo is available, Claußen has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a distant satellite view. The original lighthouse was a square wood tower attached to a 2-story keeper's house. The keeper's house was sold and relocated. Located on the point at the north side of the entrance to the Minas Basin west of Parrsboro. The lighthouse is at the end of Pleasure Cove Lane, a poorly marked single-track road. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-108; CCG A-171; Admiralty H3950; NGA 11004.
*** Port Greville (relocated)
1908. Inactive since 1976. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Neale Wagstaff has a 2020 closeup photo, Jarvis has a 2011 photo, Bash has a 2008 photo, Google has a good street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse originally stood on a bluff overlooking Port Greville Harbour. At first it was the front light of a range; in the 1920s, after a shift in the channel, it became the rear light of the range. In 1981, five years after deactivation, it was relocated to the grounds of the Coast Guard College in Sydney, Cape Breton Island. As a result of local efforts the lighthouse was returned to Port Greville in 1998 to stand on the grounds of the Age of Sail Heritage Museum. Located on NS 2 about 20 km (12.5 mi) west of Parrsboro. Site open, tower open daily except Monday late May to late September. Site manager: Age of Sail Heritage Museum . ARLHS CAN-407; ex-Admiralty H3948.
*** Spencer's Island
1904. Reactivated (inactive 1987-2006, now privately maintained and unofficial); continuous white light. 10 m (33 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. Jarvis has a photo, a 2019 photo is available, Bash has a 2008 photo, Corey Hallisey has a good closeup, Claußen has photos, and Google has a street view and a distant satellite view. The Spencers Island Community Association acquired the lighthouse in 1989 and restored it as a historical museum; it opened to the public in 1991. Further restoration was carried out in 1995-96. The Coast Guard has given permission for an unofficial light to be displayed. Located on the waterfront at Spencer's Island, on NS 209 and the north shore of the Minas Channel between Port Greville and Cape d'Or. Site open, tower open daily except Monday in July and August. Owner/operator/site manager: Spencer's Island Community Association. . ARLHS CAN-471; ex-Admiralty H3940.
Cape Sharp Light
Cape Sharp Light, September 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis

Bay of Fundy and Chignecto Bay Lighthouses
** Cape d'Or (2)
1965 (fog signal station established 1874, light station established 1922). Active; focal plane 24 m (80 ft); white flash every 9 s. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, mounted at one corner of a 1-story fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s). Two 1-story keeper's houses. Jarvis's photo is at right, Claußen has photos, a nice view is available, Bash has a 2008 photo, Trabas also has Bash's photo, Davy Ray has a street view, and Google has a satellite view of the station. The original lighthouse included a pepperpot tower relocated here from Eatonville and placed atop a square skeletal tower. The two houses, vacant after 1985, were leased and restored in 1995 by the Advocate District Development Association. One keeper's house now houses the Lightkeeper's Kitchen Restaurant and the other is an inn offering four rooms for overnight accommodations. Located on the point of the cape, at the north side of the entrance to the Minas Channel about 8 km (5 mi) off NS 209. Site open, restaurant open for lunch and dinner daily mid May to early November. Note: there is a steep climb from the light station back to the parking lot atop the bluff. Site manager: Cumberland County (Lighthouse at Cape d'Or ). ARLHS CAN-095; CCG A-167; Admiralty H3938; NGA 10980.
[Advocate Harbour (3?)]
Date unknown (station established 1883). Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); white flash every 4 s. 7 m (23 ft) square skeletal tower carrying an orange daymark. Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse was originally built on the north side of the harbor entrance, but it was relocated to the south side in 1888. The historic lighthouse, a square tower attached to a keeper's house, was destroyed by a fire in 1964. Located on a sand spit on the south side of the entrance to Advocate Harbour, about 3 km (2 mi) north of Cape D'Or. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-1131; CCG A-166; Admiralty H3934; NGA 10984.
Cape D'Or Light
Cape d'Or Light and fog signal, September 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
Île Haute (Isle Haute) (2)
1956 (station established 1878). Active; focal plane 112 m (367 ft); white flash every 4 s. 12 m (40 ft) square steel skeletal tower. The historic lighthouse, a square wood pyramidal tower attached to a keeper's house, burned in 1956. No photo of the current light available but Google has a distant satellite view. Located on the summit of Isle Haute, an island 8 km (5 mi) off Cape Chignecto. Accessible only by boat. Visible at a distance from Cape D'Or. Site and tower closed (visits to the island require permission from the Coast Guard). Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-241; CCG A-164; Admiralty H3928; NGA 10968.
Apple River (Cape Capstan) (2)
1972 (station established 1870). Active; focal plane 21.5 m (71 ft); white light, 2 s on, 10 s off. 10.5 m (35 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery. The tower was formerly attached to one corner of a 1-story fog signal building, but that building and the original lantern were removed, leaving only the tower. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Bash has a 2008 photo, Trabas also has Bash's photo, Alan Perry has a 2013 photo, and Google has a satellite view. Lighthouse Digest has a painting of the original light station. In June 2019 the Coast Guard refurbished the lighthouse and installed a new lantern room atop the tower. Located on the north side of the river entrance and on the east side of Chignecto Bay. Site status unknown, but the light can be seen distantly from Apple River Road on the other side of the river. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-014; CCG A-163; Admiralty H4032; NGA 11052.

Notable faux lighthouses:

Information available on lost lighthouses:

  • Amherst Basin Range Lights (1906-1920), Chignecto Bay, Cumberland County. The range has been discontinued and the lighthouses demolished. ARLHS CAN-1379 (front) and 1380 (rear).
  • Eatonville (1909-1922), Chignecto Bay, Cumberland County. The lighthouse was moved to Cape d'Or in 1922 and demolished in 1965. ARLHS CAN-1214.
  • Hall's Harbour (1880-1970), Minas Basin, Kings County. The wharf on which this lighthouse stood was demolished in 1970; the light has been moved to a mast on a newer wharf. Trabas has Thomas Philipp's photo of the modern light. ARLHS CAN-614; CCG A-192; Admiralty H3942; NGA 10988.
  • Horton Bluff Range Rear (1961-2013). The original tall skeletal tower was replaced by a 7 m (23 ft) tower at a greater distance from the front light. The light was probably demolished when the range was discontinued in 2013. Bing has a satellite view of the location. ex-CCG-189; ex-Admiralty H3968.1; ex-NGA 11016.
  • Joggins (1912-1950s), Cumberland Basin, Cumberland County. There is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS CAN-1234.
  • Kingsport (1878-1954?), Canning River, Minas Basin, Kings County. The first lighthouse was destroyed by fire; the second (1891) lighthouse survived until the pier was heavily damaged by Hurricane Edna in 1954. Several photos are available. There is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS CAN-894.
  • Noel (1905-1969), Minas Basin, East Hants, Hants County. The historic lighthouse burned in 1969, and there is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS CAN-1230.
  • Port Wade (1909-1962), Annapolis Basin, Annapolis County. A distant view is available. This lighthouse was replaced by a buoy offshore. ARLHS CAN-1283; CCG-209.1.
  • Portapique (Portaupique) (1913-1962), Minas Basin, Colchester County. A historic photo is available. There is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS CAN-1212.
  • Porter Point (1904-1950s?), Minas Basin, Hants County. Nova Scotia Archives has a historic photo. There is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS CAN-896.
  • Shulie (1905-1930s?), Chignecto Bay, Cumberland County. There is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS CAN-1239.
  • Sissiboo (New Edinburgh, Weymouth Harbor) (1870-2004), St. Mary's Bay, Digby County. The historic lighthouse was destroyed by a storm in 1976. It was replaced by a fiberglass post light, which was removed in 2004 and replaced by an offshore buoy. ARLHS CAN-602; CCG-232.1; ex-Admiralty H3860; ex-NGA 10820.
  • Spencer Point (1863-1960s?), Minas Basin, Colchester County. The historic lighthouse collapsed over an eroding bluff in the mid 1960s. ARLHS CAN-1240.
  • Troop Point (1906-?), Annapolis Basin, Annapolis County. The lighthouse survived at least to the late 1950s; its fate is not known. There is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS CAN-1243.
  • Wolfville (1902-?), Minas Basin, Kings County. The lighthouse was destroyed by fire in the 1970s. There is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS CAN-899.


Horton Bluff Range Rear Light, September 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis

Burntcoat Head Light, April 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis

Adjoining pages: North: Northwestern Nova Scotia | South: Southern Nova Scotia | West: Southern New Brunswick

Return to the Lighthouse Directory index

Posted 2002. Checked and revised April 19, 2022. Lighthouses: 35. Site copyright 2022 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.