Eben Moglen: The dotCommunist Manifesto: How Culture Became Property and What We’re Going to Do About It

Eben Moglen talks about culture and intellectual property.

Download the full talk at terasaur.org

Bio:

Eben Moglen earned his PhD in History and law degree at Yale University during what he sometimes calls his “long, dark period” in New Haven. He began working as a professional computer programmer in 1973, at the age of fourteen. Before and during law school, from 1979-1984, he was a designer and developer of advanced computer programming languages (VSAPL, APL2, Pascal) at IBM’s Santa Teresa Laboratory and Thomas J. Watson Research Center.

After law school he was a law clerk to Judge Edward Weinfeld of the United States District Court in New York City and to Justice Thurgood Marshall of the United States Supreme Court. He has taught at Columbia Law School–and has held visiting appointments at Harvard University, Tel-Aviv University and the University of Virginia–since 1987. From 1991-1994 he represented Philip R. Zimmerman, the author of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) in connection with a potential criminal prosecution by the United States Government.

Since 1993 he has served without fee as General Counsel of the Free Software Foundation, and has represented numerous clients in the free software world. In 2003 he was given the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Pioneer Award for efforts on behalf of freedom in the electronic society.

Presented by ibiblio. Co-sponsored by the UNC-Chapel Hill Office of the Provost, College of Arts and Sciences, School of Law, and the Howard W. Odum Institute for Research in Social Science.

Clifford Lynch: Keynote Speech at the Convocation on Scholarly Communications in a Digital World

Download the full talk at terasaur.org

Clifford A. Lynch has been the Executive Director of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since July 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation, where he managed the MELVYL information system and the intercampus internet for the University. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information Management and Systems. He is a past president of the American Society for Information Science and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Lynch currently serves on the Internet 2 Applications Council and the National Research Council Committee on Intellectual Property in the Emerging Information Infrastructure.

The Coalition for Networked Information (www.cni.org), jointly sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries and Educause, includes about 200 member organizations concerned with the use of information technology and networked information to enhance scholarship and intellectual productivity. (Biography taken from http://www.asu.edu/ecure/2005/lynch/LynchClifford_bio.html)

Convocation on Scholarly Communications in a Digital World

Lawrence Lessig: A Public Talk on Internet Governance

Lawrence Lessig talks about the “absurd notion” that if we privatize everything our problems will just go away.

Download the full talk at terasaur.org

Bio:

Lawrence Lessig is a Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and founder of the school’s Center for Internet and Society. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he was the Berkman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. Lessig was also a fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and a Professor at the University of Chicago Law School. He clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court. More recently, Professor Lessig represented web site operator Eric Eldred in the ground-breaking case Eldred v. Ashcroft, a challenge to the 1998 Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. Lessig was named one of Scientific American’s Top 50 Visionaries, for arguing “against interpretations of copyright that could stifle innovation and discourse online.”

He is the author of The Future of Ideas and Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace. He also chairs the Creative Commons project. Professor Lessig is a boardmember of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a Board Member of the Center for the Public Domain, and a Commission Member of the Penn National Commission on Society, Culture and Community at the University of Pennsylvania.

Professor Lessig earned a BA in economics and a BS in management from the University of Pennsylvania, an MA in philosophy from Cambridge, and a JD from Yale.

Professor Lessig teaches and writes in the areas of constitutional law, contracts, comparative constitutional law, and the law of cyberspace. He is currently planning a course, Law and Virtual Worlds, for Spring 2003 with Julian Dibbell.