Daniel Streett's New Blog

Post Reply
MAubrey
Posts: 991
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: Washington
Contact:

Daniel Streett's New Blog

Post by MAubrey » September 8th, 2011, 2:22 pm

I discovered this morning not only that Daniel Streett has a blog, but that he has written an excellent post on what it means to be able to *truly* read Greek. He really rips apart the idea of decoding and translating Greek. I love it.

It looks like I’ll be adding another blog to Google Reader. There aren’t many bloggers than focus <em>specifically</em> on the Greek language—NT history and theology are more popular— so I’m quite excited to see another start, especially by such an excellent Greek professor and Daniel Streett. And I’m glad that we have people focused on pedagogy, too. I’m working on making my Greek fluent, but I’m not particularly pedagogically inclined. I’m more interested in discovering the structures of the language that should under gird our knowledge of the language so that we can get closer to fluency like middle voice or noun phrase structure—don’t put your quantifiers closer to the head noun than your regular adjectives and don’t put your adjectives closer to your head noun than your genitives.

HT: Nick Noreli

This is, by the way, cross-posted at my blog as well (which you can access via my profile page).
0 x


Mike Aubrey, Linguist
Koine-Greek.com

Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2837
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: Daniel Streett's New Blog

Post by Stephen Carlson » September 8th, 2011, 2:46 pm

Nice blog post. There is one aspect in Daniel's post I have a concern about:
2.You are not having to look words up in a dictionary. If you discover a word you don’t know, you infer its meaning from the context. Or, in the rare case you do actually consult a dictionary, you consult a monolingual dictionary, i.e. one that defines English words by means of other English words.
I agree with the point, but is there a monolingual Koine dictionary? Does one exist?

I've toyed around with the idea on-and-off over the years, only to realize that lexicography, even in English, is not something natural to me.

Stephen Carlson
0 x
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

MAubrey
Posts: 991
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: Washington
Contact:

Re: Daniel Streett's New Blog

Post by MAubrey » September 8th, 2011, 3:46 pm

sccarlson wrote:I agree with the point, but is there a monolingual Koine dictionary? Does one exist?
I know that a number of people have talked about it. I hope that it will happen at some point. I've dabbled with monolingual glossing as I've worked on things, but I really haven't dug into lexicography enough to even know how reliable my glosses are--that's all be for my own personal use...
0 x
Mike Aubrey, Linguist
Koine-Greek.com

Louis L Sorenson
Posts: 709
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Location: Burnsville, MN, USA
Contact:

Re: Daniel Streett's New Blog

Post by Louis L Sorenson » September 9th, 2011, 12:22 am

Rico's Polis makes an attempt at Greek-Greek glosses. All of his beginning grammar lexicon entries have Greek-Greek glosses or examples, most often this is a sentence in Greek using the phrase in context. Some of those examples, but not all, also have French translation of the Greek sentence.
ἀνατέλλω, εις, ειν, ἀνάτειλον
Ἀνατέλλει ὁ ἥλιος καὶ ἄρχεται ἡ ἡμέρα
Le soleil se lève et le jour commence.
0 x

David Lim
Posts: 901
Joined: June 6th, 2011, 6:55 am

Re: Daniel Streett's New Blog

Post by David Lim » September 9th, 2011, 4:53 am

sccarlson wrote:Nice blog post. There is one aspect in Daniel's post I have a concern about:
2.You are not having to look words up in a dictionary. If you discover a word you don’t know, you infer its meaning from the context. Or, in the rare case you do actually consult a dictionary, you consult a monolingual dictionary, i.e. one that defines English words by means of other English words.
I agree with the point, but is there a monolingual Koine dictionary? Does one exist?

I've toyed around with the idea on-and-off over the years, only to realize that lexicography, even in English, is not something natural to me.

Stephen Carlson
What about a "lexicon" that consists essentially of simple phrases using each word that covers all its grammatical and semantic domains, just like some English dictionaries? Some give a complete English sentence to explain a word's meaning in the same way that a real person would to explain a new word to someone. Then glosses would simply be unnecessary.
0 x
δαυιδ λιμ

Daniel Streett
Posts: 9
Joined: September 9th, 2011, 7:16 pm
Location: Dallas, Texas
Contact:

Re: Daniel Streett's New Blog

Post by Daniel Streett » September 9th, 2011, 7:41 pm

Thanks, Mike, for noting my blog's παρουσία. As for monolingual dictionaries, nothing satisfactory exists right now as far as I'm aware, which perhaps shows how far we have to go. As a historical precedent, however, readers might be interested in checking out Hesychius's 5th century lexicon, which is available in TLG and has also been published in 4 vols by W. de Gruyter: http://books.google.com/books?id=hylHHy ... &q&f=false. The Suda, a 10th century hybrid of lexicon and encyclopedia, may also be of interest: http://www.stoa.org/sol/. An older public domain version is available on GoogleBooks: http://books.google.com/books?id=7OFCgP ... &q&f=false. Both of these more or less just provide glosses, so I don't think they should be taken as models.
0 x
Daniel R. Streett
Associate Professor of Greek and New Testament
Criswell College, Dallas, TX
http://danielstreett.wordpress.com

MAubrey
Posts: 991
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: Washington
Contact:

Re: Daniel Streett's New Blog

Post by MAubrey » September 9th, 2011, 10:32 pm

W. de Gruyter = nobody will ever afford it ever, ever, ever, ever, ever. :shock:
0 x
Mike Aubrey, Linguist
Koine-Greek.com

Post Reply

Return to “Seen on the Web”