[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

[nafex] Digest Number 349



------------------------------------------------------------------------
Make new friends, find the old at Classmates.com:
http://click.egroups.com/1/4052/0/_/423498/_/958287953/
------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are 17 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: mycorrhizal  innoculants
           From: "Kieran or Donna" <redherring@tnaccess.com>
      2. Re: Prunus germination
           From: Carolyn Wood <natvwine@cut.net>
      3. Pear rootstocks
           From: Carolyn Wood <natvwine@cut.net>
      4. Re: labels
           From: "victoria l. caron" <vicaron@gis.net>
      5. Re: Country Boy
           From: "Ed Forest" <edforest55@hotmail.com>
      6. Re: Pear rootstocks
           From: DocKW@aol.com
      7. Re: Re: Prunus germination
           From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
      8. Re: Re: Prunus germination
           From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom@hevanet.com>
      9. re: germinating prunus
           From: "Dan & Marilyn Mason" <dmason@rainyriver.lakeheadu.ca>
     10. Re: Re: Prunus germination
           From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
     11. Re: Re: Prunus germination
           From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
     12. RE: American Persimmons-Female on Male Graft?
           From: "Lucky.Pittman" <Lucky.Pittman@murraystate.edu>
     13. Re: Country Boy
           From: "Gordon C. Nofs" <gcnofs@hotmail.com>
     14. Re: mycorrhizal  innoculants
           From: "Doreen Howard" <doreenh@ticon.net>
     15. Re: RE: Trace minerals
           From: Sam Franc <franc@harborside.com>
     16. Re: Pear rootstocks
           From: Fluffy Bunny <the.fluffy.bunny@juno.com>
     17. Unknown attachments
           From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom@hevanet.com>


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 1
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 07:52:50 -0500
   From: "Kieran or Donna" <redherring@tnaccess.com>
Subject: Re: mycorrhizal  innoculants

Gianni,
    What a story!  I must order that stuff immediately!  Water is only a big
problem when  we NEED it.  When it rains a whole lot and we don't need it,
we have plenty.   The big trouble is watering pots, as the hotter and drier
it is, the less likely we are to have water to spare.  I put my 2 citrus
trees in the ground every summer, eliminates watering.  Forget fruit in
these conditions though.  They spend their winters at various places,
usually friends houses, and get neglected, so they don't have the stored
reserves to get going in spring.  A friend took good care of them last
winter, and the lemon is in bloom now.  I'll get them with the fungus, I
have "control" summers to compare to.
    As a rule the garden does okay, I have hauled a lot of buckets from the
spring during some pretty bad droughts, and carried my stuff through when
everyone elses died.  (Luckily that spring kept running that year)  I sort
of imagined I'd have a fine set of symbiotic fungi, with all the organic
matter in the soil, but it sounds like this company has got some really
vigorous strains.  In fact, I have considered Doreen's comment on 250 lbs
fruit from a single tomato plant, and am wondering about the nightmare I
might have with my 100 or so tomato plants.  Of course, it would be the kind
of nightmare every gardener dreams of!  I tend to be satisfied with garden
production, but I would REALLY like to see my young fruit and nut trees get
going well.  They have suffered the most from the terrible soil we've
got...and no Dan, I'm not swapping, I got out of Florida because of the
awful soil and climate there.  Harvey Lisle, retired soil scientist and
NAFEXer, said Australian farmers would think they were in Heaven if they
could have a little of our crummier land.  They have only got about 1/2 of
1% organic matter in their soils.  Chemical fertilizers do not work for
them, that's why Biodynamics is a pretty big deal there.
    The real problem with the product I have is that the instructions are to
spray it on the ground.  I have a little 2 gallon sprayer, on it's last gasp
now, (I've given it as many lives as a cat jerry-rigging it), and I don't
fancy the thought of walking around with it spraying every inch of 1/4 acre
garden, then going for all the fruit trees.  Not my idea of fun, even if I
break down and buy a new backpack sprayer.
    I'm pretty sure that the 2 types of bacteria I have fix N and P, and
that's really all they do. With a name like "Rhizobium" you'd think they
would live in or with the plant roots, but I'm pretty sure that they are
free-living....no, that's an Azobactor that sets N on it's own.  This is a
pretty esoteric subject, we're not gonna be able to ask the county agent or
a regular farmer or fertilizer dealer about it.   Nor is the info likely to
be in my micro book, which is mostly on pathogens.  It's pretty strange to
think we're discussing products that are right on the cutting edge.  Do you
realize that product you are using could potentially bring down the entire
agrichemical industry?    Donna


----- Original Message -----
From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
To: <nafex@egroups.com>
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2000 11:38 PM
Subject: Re: [nafex] mycorrhizal innoculants


> Hi Donna:
>
> A couple of points.....
> I know your water or lack thereof and the probs you have because of that.
> I wonder if a more massive root structure of your host would help with
drought
> conditions? The host would be able to hold water longer with more roots?
> Better yields--- less water?
> The bacteria you speak of is that a bacterium used to thwart septoria and
vert-
> icullum wilt and pathogens like that?
> I just did a re-pot on a Mandarin.... It lifted out of the pot as one
piece ball
> and all!
> On a theory, I eat a lot of peanuts and save the shells. I line the bottom
of
> the
> pot with them to make it light for aeration and the web like fungus was
holding
> onto all the peanut shells as well! When I broke down the ball to loosen
it for
> re-potting the spider webs were throughout the entire pot and were
clinging to
> time release fertilizer almost microscopically. I saw the web interacting
with
> the
> main root ball of the Keraji Mandarin. I remember potting this only 2
months
> ago and using John Van Hazinga's idea with the shaker can. Only I used a
spent
> Metamucil can with drilled holes in the top and cover it with a baggie and
then
> screw the cover back on when I'm done.
> Anyhow, when I put up the Mandarin I just dusted the roots. I would
> guesstimate that I was lucky if I used even a teaspoonful in a 8 quart
pot.
> When you say symbiotic, that's an understatement!
>
> Best wishes,
> John- Z-5/6
>
>
> Kieran or Donna wrote:
>
> > Well, thanks to this discussion, I began watering my inoculant into my
> > tomato and pepper seedlings before planting.  I do not see any
improvement,
> > but I also went and looked at the company whose product Doreen and
Gianni
> > and Lon use, and it's completely different stuff.  The products I have
are
> > bacteria, whereas Bio-Organics products are fungi.
> >     ACRES USA has run several articles over the last few years about how
> > symbiotic fungi run in and out of plant roots and how the plant and
fungi
> > cooperate.  In one study, symbiotic fungi had been cultured from weeds
in a
> > field that had long been fallow.  The next year it was plowed and
fertilized
> > and planted, and the fungi vanished.   The same weeds had considerably
more
> > problems with insects and disease that year.
> >     I have been interested in these fungi, but might never have gotten
> > around to trying them if it haden't been for all your rave reviews.  I
will
> > probably split a jar with friends, and spread the information around.
Donna
> >
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Special Offer-Earn 300 Points from MyPoints.com for trying @Backup
> Get automatic protection and access to your important computer files.
> Install today:
> http://click.egroups.com/1/2344/0/_/423498/_/958192430/
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 2
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 08:00:34 +0000
   From: Carolyn Wood <natvwine@cut.net>
Subject: Re: Prunus germination

The prunus around here (central Utah) are notorious germinators. 
several friends of mine joke about their plum and apricot lawns.
For a couple of years now I have been making 600-1000 gallons of prunus 
wine yearly (apr., cherry, plum, chokecherry, etc.) which is fermented 
with the pits in the must. The pits soon settle to the bottom (yes, I 
know about cyanide) of the tank and I take them out to the field by the 
five gallon bucket and throw them on the ground. Not very specialized 
but I now have countless seedling rootstock. Works great for apples and 
pears too.


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 3
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 08:09:58 +0000
   From: Carolyn Wood <natvwine@cut.net>
Subject: Pear rootstocks

I have a question. I ordered a couple dozen pear rootstocks from a good 
nursery this year and they still haven't come out of dormancy yet. This 
is a month after I bench grafted them and they have been heeled in 
outside in warm weather. A friend of mine said they were probably held 
in cold storage until shipment. 
Would it have been better to wait to graft onto these roots until they 
broke dormancy? I cut the tops of these rootstocks off and put them in 
my rooting frame and they have already leafed out!
  Bob Z4 central Utah


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 4
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 21:03:58 +0000
   From: "victoria l. caron" <vicaron@gis.net>
Subject: Re: labels

Mark,

re: printing labels with a computer, if you find a system that works you
will still have to consider materials and inks with respect to
biodegrading. Most printers are not using ink that will last very long
in sun and weather.
Metal tags can also be tacked into tree with a brad, keeping the thin
wire long. The  bark will grow over the brad and wire joint and
eventually the tag and wire will seem to grow out of the tree, no
girdling!
A good back up to tagging which I recommend to all my clients is to Map
their plantings on paper or computer documents and file them. They can
be edited at any time if a tree or plant dies, is replaced or more
specimens are added.
We all have things that work better for some than others. Hope some of
this helps you.

Victoria Caron



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 5
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 07:27:51 PDT
   From: "Ed Forest" <edforest55@hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Country Boy

>JGordon wrote:

Sorry, this is NAFEX not obituaries!
>________________________________________________________________________
Hey Gordon, that was really rude,  haven't we become more than just a 
discussion group? Can't we occassionally share a personal thought? I like to 
stay on topic as much as the next person but I think we can make a few 
exceptions. At any rate, sarcasm is certainly not necessary to get your 
point across.

Kevin B.


>

>
________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 6
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 11:53:18 EDT
   From: DocKW@aol.com
Subject: Re: Pear rootstocks

I'd plant the grafted stocks out in a nursery area....now...they'll come out 
assuming they are still viable.  Healing tthem in implies another exhumation 
and replantation...more shock for the plant.  Get 'em in the ground .
Karl Olson


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 7
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 12:44:48 -0400
   From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
Subject: Re: Re: Prunus germination

Hi Carolyn:

Can I pick a scab open here for a sec?
This obviously low intensity form of germination, does that include
peach pits?
Sounds like a great system you've devised and I specifically looked for
peach
in the identifications as I have heard they are notoriously hard to pop.

Thanks.

Best wishes,
John
Z-5/6

Carolyn Wood wrote:

> The prunus around here (central Utah) are notorious germinators.
> several friends of mine joke about their plum and apricot lawns.
> For a couple of years now I have been making 600-1000 gallons of
> prunus
> wine yearly (apr., cherry, plum, chokecherry, etc.) which is fermented
>
> with the pits in the must. The pits soon settle to the bottom (yes, I
> know about cyanide) of the tank and I take them out to the field by
> the
> five gallon bucket and throw them on the ground. Not very specialized
> but I now have countless seedling rootstock. Works great for apples
> and
> pears too.
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>            [Auction listings at govWorks.com. Click here.]
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>


[This message contained attachments]



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 8
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 10:09:18 -0700
   From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom@hevanet.com>
Subject: Re: Re: Prunus germination

What was the attachment on your letter?  It was some kind of gif file. Have
we got a virus going here?
-Lon Rombough
----------
From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
To: nafex@egroups.com
Subject: Re: [nafex] Re: Prunus germination
Date: Sat, May 13, 2000, 9:44 AM


Hi Carolyn:

Can I pick a scab open here for a sec?
This obviously low intensity form of germination, does that include
peach pits?
Sounds like a great system you've devised and I specifically looked for
peach
in the identifications as I have heard they are notoriously hard to pop.

Thanks.

Best wishes,
John
Z-5/6


[This message contained attachments]



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 9
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 13:12:44 -0500
   From: "Dan & Marilyn Mason" <dmason@rainyriver.lakeheadu.ca>
Subject: re: germinating prunus

May 12 - Chris Mauchline, SE PA, zone 6 wrote:

<Does anyone have any suggestions on how best to germinate
Prunus species?  >
-----------------

Chris,

I've always had good luck planting plum seed directly into the
garden outdoors in late fall just before the ground freezes. They
come up about the time trees are leafing out the following spring.

Dan Mason   zone 3, NW Ontario
dmason@rainyriver.lakeheadu.ca



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 10
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 19:32:14 -0400
   From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
Subject: Re: Re: Prunus germination

Hi Lon:

Just got in a little while ago, I read your post and did a complete
sweep of my system with PC-Cillin
Virus software. The software said I was clean.
I can tell you when I posted the query to Carolyn that I did not send a
...gif unless you mean the normal
banner that runs at the bottom of all eGroups posts?
If it was something attached, I was not aware that this was being sent,
as I had no intent of sending
anything to the group other than texted post.
If it is a virus, do not open any attachments, and if for some reason it
did piggyback on my post.
I am dreadfully sorry. I was totally unaware that something was
piggybacking me...
Please let me know how this post comes through.
Again, very sorry, if this is what indeed happened.
Anyone else experience this?

Regards:
John
Z, 5/6


"Lon J. Rombough" wrote:

> What was the attachment on your letter?  It was some kind of gif file.
> Have we got a virus going here?
> -Lon Rombough
> ----------
> From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
> To: nafex@egroups.com
> Subject: Re: [nafex] Re: Prunus germination
> Date: Sat, May 13, 2000, 9:44 AM
>
>
>
>      Hi Carolyn:
>
>      Can I pick a scab open here for a sec?
>      This obviously low intensity form of germination, does that
>      include
>      peach pits?
>      Sounds like a great system you've devised and I specifically
>      looked for
>      peach
>      in the identifications as I have heard they are notoriously
>      hard to pop.
>
>      Thanks.
>
>      Best wishes,
>      John
>      Z-5/6
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>            [Auction listings at govWorks.com. Click here.]
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>


[This message contained attachments]



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 11
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 19:35:52 -0400
   From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
Subject: Re: Re: Prunus germination

Hi Lon:

Just got in a little while ago, I read your post and did a complete
sweep of my system with PC-Cillin
Virus software. The software said I was clean.
I can tell you when I posted the query to Carolyn that I did not send a
...gif unless you mean the normal
banner that runs at the bottom of all eGroups posts?
If it was something attached, I was not aware that this was being sent,
as I had no intent of sending
anything to the group other than texted post.
If it is a virus, do not open any attachments, and if for some reason it
did piggyback on my post.
I am dreadfully sorry. I was totally unaware that something was
piggybacking me...
Please let me know how this post comes through.
Again, very sorry, if this is what indeed happened.
Anyone else experience this?
BTW, I did look and could find no attached.gif.

Regards:
John
Z, 5/6


"Lon J. Rombough" wrote:

> What was the attachment on your letter?  It was some kind of gif file.
> Have we got a virus going here?
> -Lon Rombough
> ----------
> From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
> To: nafex@egroups.com
> Subject: Re: [nafex] Re: Prunus germination
> Date: Sat, May 13, 2000, 9:44 AM
>
>
>
>      Hi Carolyn:
>
>      Can I pick a scab open here for a sec?
>      This obviously low intensity form of germination, does that
>      include
>      peach pits?
>      Sounds like a great system you've devised and I specifically
>      looked for
>      peach
>      in the identifications as I have heard they are notoriously
>      hard to pop.
>
>      Thanks.
>
>      Best wishes,
>      John
>      Z-5/6
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>            [Auction listings at govWorks.com. Click here.]
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>


[This message contained attachments]



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 12
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 20:31:21 -0500
   From: "Lucky.Pittman" <Lucky.Pittman@murraystate.edu>
Subject: RE: American Persimmons-Female on Male Graft?

Doc Lisenby wrote:---------
>Thanks Lucky, now all I have to do is get "lucky" enough for some of
>them to take. They ain't easy! Some say you have to sell your soul or
>something like that. Doc Lisenby

Maybe it's cuz I didn't know any better, but I've always had pretty decent 
success in the past just doing simple whip grafts on persimmons, but have also 
had good success with bark grafts, as Lon described.  Chip budded some a 
couple of weeks back, wrapped some with budding rubbers and Parafilm, some 
just with Parafilm, most appear to have taken and are now pushing leaves.

Lucky



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 13
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 20:10:53 PDT
   From: "Gordon C. Nofs" <gcnofs@hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Country Boy

Kevin
  I have had things not posted for less than that.
    I to enjoyed the first by Joe. He is a friend. But we don't have to drag 
this out. So go ahead and make me out as the bad Guy.
   Gordon

***Hey Gordon, that was really rude,  haven't we become more than just a
discussion group? Can't we occassionally share a personal thought? I like to
stay on topic as much as the next person but I think we can make a few
exceptions. At any rate, sarcasm is certainly not necessary to get your
point across.

Kevin B.


 >

 >
________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com


________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 14
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 22:53:46 -0500
   From: "Doreen Howard" <doreenh@ticon.net>
Subject: Re: mycorrhizal  innoculants

Donna,
Rhizobium is the bacteria that affixes to legumes and traps nitrogen.  Funny
thing, three years ago, I planted mycorrhizae-inoculated tomatoes next to a
patch of Truimph de Farcy filet beans.  I didn't inoculate them with
rhizobium, because the soil was in balance.  When I dug up the tomato plants
about 5 months later to check on the root structure (after heat put an end
to tomato production), I found nodules on the roots that looked like the
nitrogen nodules you find on bean roots.  I pulled up the beans, and sure
enough, the nodules were identical.  The rhizobium made the cross over to
the tomatoes.  But, I doubt if the extra nitrogen did anything for the
tomato plants.  An interesting occurrence, though.

Also, don't fret about all those tomatoes--food banks and soup kitchens will
take all you can give them.  And, they feed lots of people with health
problems who can use decent nutrition.
Doreen Howard

-----Original Message-----
From: Kieran or Donna <redherring@tnaccess.com>
To: nafex@egroups.com <nafex@egroups.com>
Date: Saturday, May 13, 2000 7:58 AM
Subject: Re: [nafex] mycorrhizal innoculants


>Gianni,
>    What a story!  I must order that stuff immediately!  Water is only a
big
>problem when  we NEED it.  When it rains a whole lot and we don't need it,
>we have plenty.   The big trouble is watering pots, as the hotter and drier
>it is, the less likely we are to have water to spare.  I put my 2 citrus
>trees in the ground every summer, eliminates watering.  Forget fruit in
>these conditions though.  They spend their winters at various places,
>usually friends houses, and get neglected, so they don't have the stored
>reserves to get going in spring.  A friend took good care of them last
>winter, and the lemon is in bloom now.  I'll get them with the fungus, I
>have "control" summers to compare to.
>    As a rule the garden does okay, I have hauled a lot of buckets from the
>spring during some pretty bad droughts, and carried my stuff through when
>everyone elses died.  (Luckily that spring kept running that year)  I sort
>of imagined I'd have a fine set of symbiotic fungi, with all the organic
>matter in the soil, but it sounds like this company has got some really
>vigorous strains.  In fact, I have considered Doreen's comment on 250 lbs
>fruit from a single tomato plant, and am wondering about the nightmare I
>might have with my 100 or so tomato plants.  Of course, it would be the
kind
>of nightmare every gardener dreams of!  I tend to be satisfied with garden
>production, but I would REALLY like to see my young fruit and nut trees get
>going well.  They have suffered the most from the terrible soil we've
>got...and no Dan, I'm not swapping, I got out of Florida because of the
>awful soil and climate there.  Harvey Lisle, retired soil scientist and
>NAFEXer, said Australian farmers would think they were in Heaven if they
>could have a little of our crummier land.  They have only got about 1/2 of
>1% organic matter in their soils.  Chemical fertilizers do not work for
>them, that's why Biodynamics is a pretty big deal there.
>    The real problem with the product I have is that the instructions are
to
>spray it on the ground.  I have a little 2 gallon sprayer, on it's last
gasp
>now, (I've given it as many lives as a cat jerry-rigging it), and I don't
>fancy the thought of walking around with it spraying every inch of 1/4 acre
>garden, then going for all the fruit trees.  Not my idea of fun, even if I
>break down and buy a new backpack sprayer.
>    I'm pretty sure that the 2 types of bacteria I have fix N and P, and
>that's really all they do. With a name like "Rhizobium" you'd think they
>would live in or with the plant roots, but I'm pretty sure that they are
>free-living....no, that's an Azobactor that sets N on it's own.  This is a
>pretty esoteric subject, we're not gonna be able to ask the county agent or
>a regular farmer or fertilizer dealer about it.   Nor is the info likely to
>be in my micro book, which is mostly on pathogens.  It's pretty strange to
>think we're discussing products that are right on the cutting edge.  Do you
>realize that product you are using could potentially bring down the entire
>agrichemical industry?    Donna
>
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "J. Rosano II" <GIANNI-2@prodigy.net>
>To: <nafex@egroups.com>
>Sent: Friday, May 12, 2000 11:38 PM
>Subject: Re: [nafex] mycorrhizal innoculants
>
>
>> Hi Donna:
>>
>> A couple of points.....
>> I know your water or lack thereof and the probs you have because of that.
>> I wonder if a more massive root structure of your host would help with
>drought
>> conditions? The host would be able to hold water longer with more roots?
>> Better yields--- less water?
>> The bacteria you speak of is that a bacterium used to thwart septoria and
>vert-
>> icullum wilt and pathogens like that?
>> I just did a re-pot on a Mandarin.... It lifted out of the pot as one
>piece ball
>> and all!
>> On a theory, I eat a lot of peanuts and save the shells. I line the
bottom
>of
>> the
>> pot with them to make it light for aeration and the web like fungus was
>holding
>> onto all the peanut shells as well! When I broke down the ball to loosen
>it for
>> re-potting the spider webs were throughout the entire pot and were
>clinging to
>> time release fertilizer almost microscopically. I saw the web interacting
>with
>> the
>> main root ball of the Keraji Mandarin. I remember potting this only 2
>months
>> ago and using John Van Hazinga's idea with the shaker can. Only I used a
>spent
>> Metamucil can with drilled holes in the top and cover it with a baggie
and
>then
>> screw the cover back on when I'm done.
>> Anyhow, when I put up the Mandarin I just dusted the roots. I would
>> guesstimate that I was lucky if I used even a teaspoonful in a 8 quart
>pot.
>> When you say symbiotic, that's an understatement!
>>
>> Best wishes,
>> John- Z-5/6
>>
>>
>> Kieran or Donna wrote:
>>
>> > Well, thanks to this discussion, I began watering my inoculant into my
>> > tomato and pepper seedlings before planting.  I do not see any
>improvement,
>> > but I also went and looked at the company whose product Doreen and
>Gianni
>> > and Lon use, and it's completely different stuff.  The products I have
>are
>> > bacteria, whereas Bio-Organics products are fungi.
>> >     ACRES USA has run several articles over the last few years about
how
>> > symbiotic fungi run in and out of plant roots and how the plant and
>fungi
>> > cooperate.  In one study, symbiotic fungi had been cultured from weeds
>in a
>> > field that had long been fallow.  The next year it was plowed and
>fertilized
>> > and planted, and the fungi vanished.   The same weeds had considerably
>more
>> > problems with insects and disease that year.
>> >     I have been interested in these fungi, but might never have gotten
>> > around to trying them if it haden't been for all your rave reviews.  I
>will
>> > probably split a jar with friends, and spread the information around.
>Donna
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> Special Offer-Earn 300 Points from MyPoints.com for trying @Backup
>> Get automatic protection and access to your important computer files.
>> Install today:
>> http://click.egroups.com/1/2344/0/_/423498/_/958192430/
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>------------------------------------------------------------------------
>Get paid for the stuff you know!
>Get answers for the stuff you donít. And get $10 to spend on the site!
>http://click.egroups.com/1/2200/0/_/423498/_/958222737/
>------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 15
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 20:57:06 -0700
   From: Sam Franc <franc@harborside.com>
Subject: Re: RE: Trace minerals

Bob,
Could you send me the name of the mine and an address?
Sam

Carolyn Wood wrote:

> >From: Sam Franc <franc@harborside.com>
> >Subject: Trace Minerals
>
> >Does anyone have a source of trace minerals.
> >I used to get 50 pound bags of them from a company in South San
> >Francisco called TMI. They seem to have gone out of business or moved
> >away from there as I can't find them.
> >The material was a pink color and granular.
> >They used to mine it from a natural source in Utah that according to
> >their literature contained small quantities of all the trace minerals
> >necessary for perfect palnt growth.
> >As I remember there were 87 different minerals by test.
> >Sam
> † The mine you are refering to is 20 miles south of me in Aurora, UT.
> I'll call over there monday and get info. I know they are still in
> operation. If anyone else is interested, just indicate on the chat and
> I'll send info to you also.
> Hot in Utah, Bob
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> High rates giving you headaches? The 0% APR Introductory Rate from
> Capital One. 9.9% Fixed thereafter!
> http://click.egroups.com/1/3010/0/_/423498/_/957654963/
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 16
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 19:08:27 -0500
   From: Fluffy Bunny <the.fluffy.bunny@juno.com>
Subject: Re: Pear rootstocks

Carol wrote:

I have a question. I ordered a couple dozen pear rootstocks from a good 
nursery this year and they still haven't come out of dormancy yet. This 
is a month after I bench grafted them and they have been heeled in 
outside in warm weather. A friend of mine said they were probably held 
in cold storage until shipment. 
Would it have been better to wait to graft onto these roots until they 
broke dormancy? 

My reply:

Your benchgrafts are fine...this is fairly normal for Pyrus.

		Very truly yours, Kevin(the fluffy bunny)Mathews
________________________________________________________________
YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!
Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!
Try it today - there's no risk!  For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 17
   Date: Sat, 13 May 2000 21:31:16 -0700
   From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom@hevanet.com>
Subject: Unknown attachments

I got brave and opened the unknown attachment on John Rosano's letter and
found it was  an AD.  The BLEEPING Egroups setup is now adding ads to NAFEX
list letters as attachments.  Can we get another service?  I REALLY don't
need one that does that, and makes me think I've just gotten a virus.
-Lon Rombough


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________