Login

Publications  •  Project Statistics

Glossary  •  Schools  •  Disciplines
People Search: 
   
Title/Abstract Search: 

Dissertation Information for Thomas L. Hart

NAME:
- Thomas L. Hart
- (Alias) Thomas Hart

DEGREE:
- Ph.D.

DISCIPLINE:
- Library and Information Science

SCHOOL:
- Case Western Reserve University (USA) (1974)

ADVISORS:
- Patricia Goheen

COMMITTEE MEMBERS:
- Conrad H. Rawski
- Winfield G. Doyle
- John Milford Goudeau

MPACT Status: Fully Complete

Title: Conceptualizing a model for access to multi-media materials in elementary and secondary schools a study of cataloging and processing by commercial, centralized, and local processing units

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine the present capabilites of school librar media centers to process all types of media either at the local building or through the use of a centralized processing center, and to determine whether alternative methods might be employed with at least equal or better operational success than present methods. The aspects of the problem are: packaging and distribution systems, processing systems, classification, and organization of instructional materials for school media centers in the United States. These components are examined as they relate to (1) size (pupil population) and level of school, (2) education and experience of directors, (3) size of staff, (4) per pupil and per item processing costs for local schools and centralized processing centers, and (5) publishers' reserach and estimated cost factors for selected processing procedures. Three seperate questionnaires were developed and pre-tested during the 1972-73 school year using selected representative groups who are similar to the population (centralized processing centers, local processing centers, and publishers or producers of multimedia) being studied: and by experts in school library media management, publishing, statistical analysis, and computer operations. The data are tested and anlyzed using chi-square analysis, point bi-serial correlations, discriminate function analysis, and analysis of variance.

After examining and summarizing the data from the three data groups, it is apparent that:

1. There is considerable duplication of effort between local processing, centralized processing, and commercial processing of multi-media materials for the elementary and secondary schools of the United States;

2. The procedures currently used by the various educational and commerical agencies which catalog and/or process materials were developed through compromise and to meet immediate needs rather than through rigorous scientific investigation;

3. Many centralized processing centers are being phased out or curtailed because of budgetary restraints and are being replaced by commerical cataloging and/or processing services;

4. The responses to the questionnaires sent to the stratified random samples of school building level media centers, school district centralized processing centers, and publishers of print and non-prnt media indicate the feasibility of conceptualizing a national center to standardize, catalog, and coordinate the processing of multi-media materials in cooperation with publishers; and

5. The need for leadershp to standardize procedures for processing and/or cataloging of multi-media materials and to encourage the development of new multi-media systems.

This study conceptualizes the establishment of a national center to develop standardized procedures for making all types of instructional materials available to students and teachers in the elementary and secondary schools of the United States. It is envisioned that this center, or more appropriately, clearinghouse might encompass (1) collection and distribution of free and inexpensive materials, (2) cataloging of print media, (3) cataloging of visual and audio media, (4) bibliographic control of U.S. materials, and (5) a systematic review and critiquing of all new materials.

After analyzing all of the services which can be coordinated by a national clearninghouse, the Critical Path Method developed by the industrial community, is used to conceptualize the mosel. Ths technique is usful in planning complex project where a wide and varied range of activities must be sequences and coordinated. This study concludes with the conceptualization of a national processing model for school library media centers divided into (1) the basic concept phase (this investigation), (2) the decision making phase (involoving all relevant national organizations and decision making groups), (3) the experimental phas, and (4) the operational phase.

MPACT Scores for Thomas L. Hart

A = 16
C = 41
A+C = 57
T = 16
G = 1
W = 16
TD = 16
TA = 0
calculated 2008-07-06 22:46:16

Advisors and Advisees Graph

Directed Graph

Students under Thomas L. Hart

ADVISEES:
- O. Mell Busbin - Florida State University (1983)
- Sarah Lewis Marxsen - Florida State University (1986)
- William Frederick Droessler - Florida State University (1987)
- Dumont C. Bunn - Florida State University (1989)
- Linda A. Forrest - Florida State University (1993)
- Terence F. Sebright - Florida State University (1994)
- Cora Phelps Dandy - Florida State University (1994)
- Candace Keller-Raber - Florida State University (1995)
- Abdulrazzaq H. Ali - Florida State University (1997)
- Sandra D. Andrews - Florida State University (1997)
- Willette F. Stinson - Florida State University (1998)
- Fahad Alsehli - Florida State University (1999)
- Rashed S. Al-Zahrani - Florida State University (2000)
- Margie Jean Klink Thomas - Florida State University (2000)
- Mansour A. Alzamil - Florida State University (2002)
- Ahmad G. Abdulla - Florida State University (2003)

COMMITTEESHIPS:
- Teresa Gayle Poston - Florida State University (1976)
- Sara Lambert Buckmaster - Florida State University (1979)
- Judith F. Davie - Florida State University (1979)
- John Paul Nunelee - Florida State University (1980)
- Carole Rhunette Taylor - Florida State University (1980)
- Jody Beckley Charter - Florida State University (1982)
- Barbara H. Ortiz - Florida State University (1982)
- Edwin Lee Holton - Florida State University (1984)
- Mary Emma Henderson - Florida State University (1985)
- Albert Franklin Spencer - Florida State University (1985)
- Marilyn L. Shontz - Florida State University (1986)
- Karmidi Martoatmojo - Florida State University (1987)
- Joyce White Mills - Florida State University (1987)
- Elizabeth G. Schmidt - Florida State University (1987)
- Husain Ahmed Ebrahim Al-Ansari - Florida State University (1992)
- Kay Bishop - Florida State University (1992)
- Diljit Singh - Florida State University (1993)
- Saleh Al-Baridi - Florida State University (1994)
- Doris Bowers Herring - Florida State University (1994)
- Patricia T. Bauer - Florida State University (1995)
- Elizabeth Mary Fordon - Florida State University (1995)
- Ali Fakher Al-Khabbaz - Florida State University (1996)
- Marilyn Naito - Florida State University (1996)
- Scharlotte Saxon - Florida State University (1997)
- Vivian Joan Hall Royster - Florida State University (1998)
- Ruth Maddox Swan - Florida State University (1998)
- Aman Salem Abdullah - Florida State University (2000)
- Shaheen Al-Hosini - Florida State University (2000)
- Elizabeth Blackwell Clark-Claytor - Florida State University (2000)
- Billie Blankenship Oakes - Florida State University (2000)
- Saeed Saad S. Aseery - Florida State University (2001)
- Paula Haver Chambers - Florida State University (2001)
- Robert Paul Visk - Florida State University (2001)
- Ali Saad Al-Ali Al-Ghamdi - Florida State University (2002)
- Abdulmohsin Hasan Al-Harbi - Florida State University (2002)
- Abdulrahman Alqarni - Florida State University (2003)
- Kimberly Black-Parker - Florida State University (2003)
- Amgad A. Elgohary - Florida State University (2003)
- Yasir Nasser Al-Saleh - Florida State University (2004)
- Gloria G. Horning - Florida State University (2005)
- Ruth A. Hodges - Florida State University (2006)