The Fiddler’s Companion

© 1996-2009 Andrew Kuntz

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

[COMMENT1] [COMMENT2] 

DE - DEL

[COMMENT3] 

 

Notation Note: The tunes below are recorded in what is called “abc notation.” They can easily be converted to standard musical notation via highlighting with your cursor starting at “X:1” through to the end of the abc’s, then “cutting-and-pasting” the highlighted notation into one of the many abc conversion programs available, or at concertina.net’s incredibly handy “ABC Convert-A-Matic” at

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html 

 

**Please note that the abc’s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc conversion programs. For example, I use abc2win and abcNavigator 2 with no problems whatsoever with direct cut-and-pasting. However, due to an anomaly of the html, pasting the abc’s into the concertina.net converter results in double-spacing. For concertina.net’s conversion program to work you must remove the spaces between all the lines of abc notation after pasting, so that they are single-spaced, with no intervening blank lines. This being done, the F/C abc’s will convert to standard notation nicely. Or, get a copy of abcNavigator 2 – its well worth it.   [AK]

 

 

[COMMENT4] 

DE BEATHA AD' SHLAINTE, UI SHUILLEABHAIN MHOIR. AKA and see "Painneach na nUbh."

                       

DE BHARR AN CNOCH (Over the Hill). AKA - “De Bharr na gCnoc.” Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AB. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 114, pg. 97. Green Linnet SIF‑1084, Eugene O'Donnell ‑ "The Foggy Dew" (1988).

                       

DE BHARR NA gCNOC IS IN IMIGÉIN. AKA and see “Over the Hills and Far Away [4].”

                       

DE DELAI LOU RIBOTEL. French, Valse (3/4 time). C Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Stevens (Massif Central), vol. 1, 1987; No. 62.

                       

DE GHRÁ NA SEAN-MHEASÚLACHTA. AKA and see "For the Sake of Old Decency."

                       

DE GOLYER. American, Hornpipe. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody is attributed to “Garfield” in Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883), apparently a joke as the De Golyer paving-contract scandal was one of two involving President James Garfield (1831-1881).  At the time Garfield was a Republican congressman, and had prepared a brief arguing the merits of a certain pavement, which he argued before a congressional committee. When, later on, the contract was found to be fraudulent, political opponents made much of Garfield’s involvement, yet he seems to have had nothing to do with the contractual arrangements, and only received a fee for his preparation and delivering of the brief on what was considered a superior product. Garfield was assassinated early in his first term by a low-level bureaucrat who had been spurned for a patronage position (and two years prior to the publication of Ryan’s Mammoth Collection). Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 89. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 124.

X:1

T:De Golyer

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:B_

F | B/A/B/c/ B/c/d/e/ | f/=e/f/g/ f/d/c/B/ | f/=e/f/g/ f/d/c/B/ | A/f/c/A/ F(G/A/) | B/A/B/c/ B/c/d/e/ |

f/=e/f/g/ f/f/g/a/ | b/a/g/f/ =e/f/g/a/ | fff :: c/B/ | A/f/c/f/ A/f/c/f/ | B/f/d/f/ B/f/d/f/ | g/a/b/a/ g/f/e/d/ |

c/B/A/G/ F/G/A/F/ | B/c/d/B/ G/A/=B/G/ | c/d/e/c/ A/B/c/A/ | B/b/a/g/ f/e/d/c/ | dBB :|

                       

DE MARTELLY. American, Contra Dance Tune (6/8 time). G Major. Standard. AABB. A modern composition by caller Dudley Laufman (Canterbury, New Hampshire), in honor of the de Martellys, a family who lived and worked in a converted barn in Nelson, New Hampshire, the site of many dances. Laufman (Okay, Let's Try a Contra, Men on the Right, Ladies on the Left, Up and Down the Hall), 1973; pg. 31.

                       

DÈ NI MI GUN LÈINE GHLAN (What will I do without a clean shirt?).  Scottish, Air (6/8 time). D Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 24.

 

DEACON JONES. Old‑Time. County 410, "The East Texas Serenaders, 1927‑1936."

                       

DEACON OF THE WEAVERS. Scottish. Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing of this tune in Robert Bremner's 1768 2nd collection (pg. 104).

                       

DEAD MARCH. Composed by Kentucky bluegrass mandolinist Bill Monroe. Bee Balm 302, “The Corndrinkers.”

                       

DEAD MARCH IN SAUL, THE. English, March. Saul was composed by George Frideric Handel in 1738-39. This has become one of the most famous of funeral airs, used on may occasions in the 18th and 19th centuries. It was, for example, played during the progress of the hero Lord Horatio Nelson’s casket from Westminster to St. Paul’s. It was played before military executions in the British army, and was the most frequently used funeral march by American Civil War bands. The tune was also played for other kinds of executions as well in the 19th century. For example, Captain Boteler of H.M.S. Gloucester witnessed the hanging of twenty Spanish pirates at Port Royal, Jamaica, in 1823:

***

Early in the morning the Gloucester’s boats, manned and armed with

a guard of marine drums and fifes, went up to Kingston, returning

in a procession towing the launch with the captain and nine pirates,

the drums and fifes giving out the ‘Dead march in Saul’ ‘Adeste

Fideles,’ etc.  The following morning the other ten were also exe-

cuted—a fearful sight. No men could go to their death with less

apparent concern.  Before the captain first went up the ladder he

called upon his men to remember they were before foreigners and

to die like Spaniards.   [Michael Pawson & David Buisseret, Port Royal, Jamaica; Oxford, 1975].

***

X:1

T:Dead March in Saul, The

M:C
L:1/8

N:”Adagio”

K:C

E2E2E2zE|ED/E/ FE D2 z2|F2 FG/A/ F2 zA|GF E(3D/E/F/ E2z2|

G2G2G3 G/A/|_BBBA G2 zG|GF zE ED zG|GF/E/ FE D4:|

|:G2A2B2 zc|BA/G/ A^F GD G2|(G4 G2) (A2|A)G/F/ E>D D2 z2|

e2 e>f/g/4 e2 ze|dcfe d2 z2|g2 c’2g2 zg|.f.e.d>c. c2 z2||

                       

DEAD NIGGER, THE. See "The Dead Slave."

                       

DEAD SLAVE, THE. AKA‑ "The Dead N….r." AKA and see “Fiddler’s Hoedown.” Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri (an "old Boone County tune"‑Christeson). D Major. Standard or ADae. AABB (Christeson): AABBCC' (Phillips). Howard Marshall informs that this tune was popularized by "The Fiddlin’ Sheriff," George Morris, of Columbia in the 30s, 40s, and early 50s.  “The title of the tune is said by many, including the late Taylor McBaine, to commemorate a public lynching of a black man in Columbia, sometime in the late 1920s. The victim of the lynching was accused of raping the young daughter of a professor at the University of Missouri and was awaiting trial.  The site of the rape was a wooden bridge (now gone) over the old KATY railroad tracks on the west side of campus; when the mob took the fellow from the Boone County jail up town, they brought him to the spot and hung him from the bridge over the KATY tracks.  The girl's father pleaded with the mob, but to no avail.  The story was covered in local papers.  I think "Dead Slave" was Bob Christeson's "AKA" for the actual title…” Missouri fiddlers also call the tune “Fiddler’s Hoedown,” while the Ozarks breakdown “Brickyard Joe [1]” has a similar first strain. Source for notated version: John Hartford [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, vol. 1), 1994; pg. 67. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, vol. 2), 1984; pg. 64.

                       

DEADLY WARS, THE. English, March. C Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 32, No. 36.

                       

DEAF OLD MAN, THE. AKA and see "An Seanduine Spad-Chluasach."

                       

DEAF WOMAN'S COURTSHIP. AKA and see "Ducks on the Millpond."


                       

DEAL CONFOUND YE MOLDRATT (!?!). Northumbrian. One of the "missing tunes" of William Vickers' 1770 Northumbrian dance tune manuscript.

                       

DEAL STICK THE MINISTER [1]. Scottish, Dance Tune (3/4 time). A Minor. Standard. AB. Printed in Henry Playford's 1700 collection of Scottish dance tunes. "(It) is still as well‑known as it was in 1683 when a Stirling man was 'tried for reviling a parson,' in causing the piper play ‘The Deil Stick the Minister’. Sundry pipers were there present as witnesses, to declare it was the name of ane spring'" (Alburger, 1983). Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 7, pg. 25.

 

DEAL STICK THE MINISTER [2]. See "De'il Stick the Minister."

                       

DEALADOIR, AN (The Wheelwright). AKA and see "The Wheelwright."

                       

DEAN BRIG/BRIDGE O' EDINBURGH, THE. AKA and see "Miss Gray of Carse/Corse." Scottish, Air or Slow Strathspey. E Flat Major. Standard. One part (Bain): AB (Hunter, Skinner). The Dean Bridge is a sandstone structure to the northwest of central Edinburgh some 447 feet in length, spanning a deep valley over the Water of Leith. It was opened in 1831 after being designed and built by Thomas Telford. The new bridge opened access to the north of the city, during the development of the New Town.

***

The Dean Brig of Edinburgh
***

The composition credited to Airchie, or Archibald, Allan (1794‑1831) of Forfar (who was thought to have been a fiddler in Nathaniel Gow's band for a time, and who, according to Alexander Lowson, played "neat and powerful especially in the Strathspeys"), though Alburger (1983), seemingly alone, believes he is unlikely to have written it‑‑"Compilers at least from the time of Skinner (including Emmerson, 1971) have written that Allan originally published this as 'Miss Gray of Carse;' however, the tunes have nothing in common." Skinner (1904), Hunter (1988) and Hardie (1992) all agree that the tune was originally "Miss Gray of Carse," and say Peter Milne took it up, made it a specialty and played it into popularity under the present title.  Honeyman (1898) falsely identifies another source for the melody: "This lovely melody is given in some collections as a composition of Peter Milne's, but that is a mistake. It was written by the Rev. Mr. Tough, but improved by Milne, who raised the first half of the second part an octave higher, though by doing so it is make to challenge comparison with the second part of 'Lady Mary Ramsay,' which Mr. Tough seems to have wished to avoid. It must be played with long sweeping bows, and makes a capital solo, followed with 'Bank's Hornpipe,' and finishing with the 'Trumpet Hornpipe.'" The first ascription to the Rev. Tough of Kinnoul as composer of the tune was in Davie's Caledonian Repository, where it appeared first under the "Dean Brig" title. J. Scott Skinner’s (1904) note reads:

***

The original title of this tune was ‘Miss Gray of Carse.’ The Rev. Mr. Tough, Kinnoul, got

hold of a copy and gave it to Davie of Aberdeen, who published it in his Caledonian Repository

as Mr. Tough’s under the new name of “Dean Bridge.”  The tune was ably revised by Peter

Milne, and C. Middleton, Keith, in his book made the mistake of assigning it to him.

Ultimately both the minister’s name and Peter’s were withdrawn, and the tune was credited

to its rightful author, Archie Allan of Forfar, who was one of the very best players and

composers of his day.

***

Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 18. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 67 (with variations by J.F. Dickie). Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 35. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 181. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 40. Skinner (Harp and Claymore Collection), 1904; pg. 20.

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:Dean Bridge of Edinburgh, The

M:C

L:1/8

S:Honeyman – Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor  (1898)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

R:Slow Strathspey

K:Eb

E/F/G/A/|B>c B<e B<G G>=F|E>FG>F E<B, B,2|C>EB,>E A,>E G,2|

C>F F>_E D/E/F/D/ B>G|B>c B<e B<G G>=F|E>FG>F E<B, B2|

C>AB,>G A,>F G,>c|B>cB>D (E2 E)||f|g>e e>g f<d d>f|e<c c>^a b<B B>_d|

c<A A>c B<G GB|c<F F>_E D/E/F/D/ B,>F|G<E E>G F<D D>F|

E<C C>=A _B<B, B,>E|C>AB,>G A,>F G,>c|B>cB>D (E2 E)||

           


DEAN BRIG REEL, THE. Scottish, Reel. E Flat Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Peter Milne (1824-1908), originally appearing in his Selection of Strathspeys, Reels (1870). Milne was known as the 'Tarland Minstrel', and was so enamoured of his craft that he once said, "I was that fond o' my fiddle, I could sit inside it and look oot." Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 44.

           

DEAN MARCAIGEACT MILE. AKA and see "Ride a Mile."

           

DEAN MASSEY. Irish, Air or Planxty. Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) in 1720 on the occasion of his visit to Charles and Grace Massey (nee Miss Grace Dillon) at Doonass, County Clare. Charles Massey was the Dean of Limerick. The only portrait of O'Carolan was drawn at this time by a dutch artist who was in the neighborhood.

           

DEANFAD MA TIG LIOM. AKA and see "I Will If I Can [1]."

           

DEANFAID PORT EILE. AKA and see "Another Jig Will Do."

           

DEAN’S FAVORITE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Virginia. C Major. Standard. AB. The title comes from Alan Jabbour, named for the son of Glen Lyn, Virginia, fiddler Henry Reed. Dean is the brother of James Reed, Jabbour’s friend and accompanist, and, since he frequently requests the tune and it has no title, Jabbour christened it in his honor. Source for notated version: Alan Jabbour, from Henry Reed [Silberberg]. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 34.

                       

DEAR AILEEN I’M GOING TO LEAVE YOU. Irish, Air (3/4 time). Ireland, County Cork. F Minor. Standard tuning. One part. Identified by the collector as a Cork tune. Source for notated version: collected in the mid-19th century by George Petrie from P. MacDowell [Stanford/Petrie]. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 300, pg. 75.

           

DEAR ALICE. AKA and see "Chere Alice."

           

DEAR BASSETTE. AKA and see "Chere Bassette."

           

DEAR BLACK COW [1] (Druimin Dubh). AKA and see "The Black Cow." Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Dorian. Standard tuning. AAB. The words lament the loss of a cow, comparing it to the celebrated mythological Irish cow which could never be fully milked. In Bunting's 1840 collection he gives a few verses of a political song in which "the black cow" serves as a "very whimsical metaphor, the cause of the exiled monarch." Other writers, notably George Petrie, Patrick Walsh, Margaret Hannegan, Seamus Clandillon and Redfern Mason, believe "Drimin/Druimin Dubh" (or "Dhriman Dhoun Deelish" "Drimin donn Dilis" etc.) also note the title's symbolizm with Ireland. Cazden (et al, 1982) finds that, "with sufficiently imaginative adjustment," the melody resembles the "Drimindown" tune family, which includes O'Neill's "The Sorrowful Maiden" and Cazden's own Catskill Mountain (New York) collected ballad "The Maid on the Shore."  Source for notated version: noted by the Irish collector Edward Bunting from the playing of harper Arthur O'Neill, 1800. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 42, pgs. 63-64.

 

DEAR BLACK COW [2] (An Druim-Fionn Dub Dileas). AKA and see "Colly, My Cow," "The Peasant's Grief." Irish, "Very Slow" Air (3/8 time). E Minor. Standard tuning. One part. A variation of version #1. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 130, pg. 23.

X:1

T:Dear Black Cow [2]

M:3/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Very slow”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 130

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

(E/>F/) | (G2F) | E/>E/^D (E/>F/) | (G2F) | Ez (D/>E/) | (F2E) | (D/>B,/A,/>B,/D/>E/) | (F2E) |

Dz(E/>F/) | (G2F) | E/>E/^D (E/>F/) | (G2A) | G/>F/ F2 | (E/F/G/A/B/>d/) | ee (3c/B/A/ | (G2F) | E2 ||

           


DEAR BLACK WHITE-BACKED COW, THE (Druimin Dubh Dílis). Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Dorian. Standard tuning. AAB. "...From Mr. James Blair, Armagh. Forde gives this in connexion with Bunting's Druimin dubh, and with several other settings of it taken from different individuals. But this version of Mr. Blair is so different from all that it may be said to be a distinct air" (Joyce). Cazden (et al, 1982) also concludes that this melody is unrelated to other "Druimin Dubh Dilis" or "Drimindown" tunes. O’Neill (1922) says: “In former times it was much more common to find a white stripe along the spine of brown or black cows, and this coloration was called "Druim-fionn", or white-black, which became "Drimmin" or "Drimen". Thus we have "Drimmin-fionn-dubh" or White-back black cow, etc. In poetical literature those titles are allegorical. "Drimmin Dhu" was a political password among the Irish Jacobites, and all "Drimmin" songs breathe a spirit of fealty to the Jacobite cause.” Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 445, pg. 250.

X:1

T:Dear Black White-Backed Cow, The

T:Druimin Dubh Dílis

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Sow and with feeling”

B:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs, No. 445 (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Gdor

(3DEF|G2G2 AG|F2G2A2|A2 f2e2|d4 de|f2e2 fd|c2B2A2|

B2c2A2|G4:||D2|G4 G2|F2D2D2|F4 D2|D4D2|G4 G2|F2G2A2|

A2f2e2|d4 de|f2e2 fd|c2B2A2|B2c2A2|G4||

           

DEAR CATHOLIC BROTHER. Irish, Air. In Wales the tune is known as “Difyrrwch Gwyr Dufi" (The Delight of the Men of Dovey), printed in 1781.

           

DEAR COLLIN. English, Jig (12/8 time). England, North‑West. A Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. Knowles (Northern Frisk), 1988; No. 99.

           

DEAR DARK ROSE, THE. AKA and see "Roisin Dubh."

           

DEAR DARLING. AKA and see "Chere Cherie."

           

DEAR DOCTOR. AKA and see "Doctor, Doctor."

           

DEAR EVERYTHING. AKA and see "Chere Tout-Toute."

           

DEAR FOSTER BROTHER AVOID THE TOWER.  See “A cho-dhalta mo ruin! Seachainn an dun!”

 

DEAR IRISH BOY [1], THE. Irish, Air (3/4 time). A Aeolian. Standard tuning. AB. Roche Collection, 1982; vol. 1, pg. 25, No. 49

 

DEAR IRISH BOY [2], THE (An Buacaill Dileas Ua Eirinn). AKA and see "Dear Irish Maid," "The Wild Irish Boy [1]." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). E Aeolian (O'Neill, Roche): D Minor (Joyce). Standard tuning. AB. "This was universally known, sung, and played in my early days (c. 1845). The words smack of the classical schoolmaster, and there are a few strained expressions. Nevertheless, taken as a whole it is very pleasing: and its under‑current of tenderness more than compensates for the spice of pedantry. The pathetic beauty of the air renders praise from me unnecessary. I give it here just as I learned it. My versions of air and words differ from those already published. There is another song to this air, 'O, Weary's on Money, and Weary's on Wealth,' which will be found in the collections of Duffy, Williams, Lover, Barry, and others" (Joyce). John Moulden finds the first publication of the song to be in the Dublin Monthly Magazine of March, 1842, as gives two sets of words (calling the ‘My Connor’ set the older). The magazine records that the air was contributed by a Mr James Barton and was believed to be the composition of his brother, John Barton, who had other compositions to his credit. The lyrics below are found in H. Halliday Sparling's Irish Minstrelsy (1887).

***

My Connor, his cheeks are as ruddy as morning,

The brightest of pearls do but mimic his teeth,

While nature with ringlets his mild brows adorning,

His hair Cupid’s bow-strings, and roses his breath.

Smiling, beguiling, cheering, endearing,

Together how oft o’er the mountains we strayed,

By each other delighted and fondly united,

I have listened all day to my dear Irish Boy.

***

No roebuck more swift could fly over the mountain,

No veteran bolder meet danger or scars;

He’s sightly, he’s sprightly, he’s clear as the fountain,

His eyes twinkle love - oh! He’s gone to the wars.

Smiling, beguiling, etc.

***

The soft tuneful lark, his notes changed to mourning,

The dark screaming owl impedes my night’s sleep,

While lonely I walk in the shade of the evening,

Till my Connor’s return I will ne’er cease to weep.

Smiling, beguiling, etc.

***

The war being over, and he not returned,

I fear that some dark, envious plot has been laid,

Or that some cruel goddess has him captivated,

And left here to mourn his dear Irish maid.

Smiling, beguiling, etc.

***

In the recent past it was a favorite slow air of pipers, with versions renditions on record by Willie Clancy, Tommy Reck, Leo Rowsome and Felix Doran. James Kelly (1996) remarks that the air was a favourite of County Clare fiddlers Bobby Casey and Joe Ryan.

***

Source for notated version: Chicago Police Sergeant James O’Neill, a fiddler originally from County Down and Francis O’Neill’s collaborator [O’Neill]. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 398, pg. 207. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 68, pg. 42 (appears as "The Wild Irish Boy"). O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 73, pg. 13. Roche Collection, 1982; vol. 1, pg. 25, No. 50. Capelhouse Records, James Kelly – “Traditional Irish Music” (1996). Claddagh CC11, Leo Rowsome – “The Drones and Chanters, vol. 1.” Ossian OSS 53, Fintan Vallely – “Totally Traditional Tin Whistles.” Danny O’Donnell – “The Donegal Fiddler.”

X:1

T:Dear Irish Boy, The [2]

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow and tenderly”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903),  No. 73

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

D>E | F3 F ED | A2 G3 {A/G/}E | D2 D2 ED | D2 C2 DE | F2 E3 {F/E/}D |

E2 A2 A>G | F2D2E2 | D4 DE | F3 F E{F/E/}D | A2 G3 {A/G/}E |

D2 D2 ED | D2 C2 DE | F3 G A/B/^c | d4 A>G | F3 D E<A |D4 || A^c |

d2 A2 A2 | d2 A2 AG | F2 D2 E{F/E/}D | D2 C2 AG | A2 d2 de | f2 e2 dc |

A2 d2 {f}e2 | d4 de | f2e2d2 | d2 A2 AG | F2 D2 E<D | D2 C2 DE |

F3 G A/B/^c | d4 A>G | F3 D E<A | D4 ||

 

DEAR IRISH BOY [3], THE. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Minor. Standard tuning. AB. This is a duple time version of the same tune as [2]. Source for notated version: the whistling of James Connor, porter (Dublin, Ireland) [Darley & McCall]. Darley & McCall (Darley & McCall Collection of Irish Music), 1914; No. 59, pg. 26.

           

DEAR IRISH MAID. AKA and see "Dear Irish Boy [2].”

           

DEAR LISA. AKA and see “Have a Drink with/on Me.”

                       


DEAR LITTLE ISLAND, THE (An Oileanin Dileas). AKA and see "The Tempest [1]," "Ap Shenkin," "Even and Odd, Like Tom with His Hod," "Mississippi." Irish, March (6/8 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AB. A form of the tune best known as "The Tempest." Bayard (1981) dates the air from at least the early 19th century. He found the tune in Parry's The Welsh Harper (vol. 1, pg. 105), with the claim that it had been "Composed by J. Parry, 1803," who complained that it had been pirated by other publishers in the British Isles and the Continent. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1831, pg. 344.

X:1

T:Dear Little Island, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:March

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 1831

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

d/c/ | B2B Bgf | e2e efg | d>ed dcB | BAA A2 d/c/ | B2B Bgf | e2 e efg |

ded cBA | AGG G2 || g/a/ | b2g a2f | gfe dcB | cde dgB | BAA A2 g/a/ |

b2g a2f | gfe agf | bag fge | dgf edc ||

           

DEAR LITTLE ONE. AKA and see "Chere Petite."

           

DEAR LITTLE SHAMROCK, THE (An Seamrogin Dileas). Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. One part. Source for notated version: Chicago Police Sergeant James O’Neill, a fiddler originally from County Down and Francis O’Neill’s collaborator [O’Neill]. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 178, pg. 31.

X:1

T:Dear Little Shamrock, The

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Moderate”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 178

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

Ad | f4 ff | f4 f2 | e2f2e2 | d4 dd | d2f2a2 | a2g2f2 | f2 e2 z2 | z2z2 de |

f2g2f2 | f2e2d2 | e2f2e2 | d4 dB | A2d2f2 | a2g2e2 |e2 d2 z2 | z2z2 cd |

e4 fe | e2 c2 d2 | e2c2a2 | e2 c3e | a4 gf | e4 dc | B2e2d2 | c2 A2 Ad | f3f f2 |

f2 d2 (A/B/c/d/e/f/) | g3g g2 | g2 e2 A2 | d4 ef | g3a b2 | a2 g2 f2 | e2 d2 ||

           

DEAR MEAL (IS CHEAP AGAIN), THE. AKA and see "Lucy Campbell [2]," "Cairngorum," "Leap Year [2]." Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB.

X:1

T: The Dear Meal is Cheap Again

R:Reel

Q: 232

K:D

M:4/4

L:1/8

|:B|AF ED dF ED|EB BA BE EB|AF ED dg fe|dB AF AD DB|

AF ED dF ED|EB BA BE EB|AF ED dg fe|dB AF AD Df|

ab af de fd|ee ba be ef|ab af dg fe|dB AF AD Df|

ab af de fd|ee ba be ef|ab af dg fe|dB AF AD D:|

           

DEAR MOM. AKA and see "Chère Mam'."

           

DEAR MOTHER HE IS GOING, AND I KNOW NOT HOW TO BID HIM STAY. Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard. One part. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; Nos. 759 & 760, pg. 190.

X:1

T:Dear mother he is going, and I know not how to bid him stay [1]

M:3/4
L:1/8

N:”Andante”

R:Air

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 759

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

(B/A/) GE | F_d B/A/F/E/ FE/F/ | EE E (g/f/) e(B/A/) | (B>c) d(e/f/) g(f/e/) |

ee e2 (E/F/G/A/) | (B>c) de/f/ g(f/e/) | d>e d/B/A GE | F_d B/A/F/E/ FE/F/ | EE E :|

X:2

T:Dear mother he is going, and I know not how to bid him stay [2]

M:3/4

N:”Andante”

R:Air
L:1/8

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 760

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

B/A/ GE | F_d (B/4A/4F/4E/4) (F/E/4)F/4 .E.E | E3 g/f/ eB/=A/ |

(B>c d/)e/4f/4 g/f/4g/4 ee | e3 (E/F/) GA | B>c d/e/4f/4 gf/4e/4 _d>e |

{_d}B3 AGE | F_d (B/4A/4F/4G/4) (F/E/4)F/4 .E.E | E3 E/F/ GA |

B>c d/e/4f/4 g/f/4e/4 d>e | {_d}B3 AGE | F_d B/4A/4F/4E/4 F/E/4F/4 | EE E :|

           

DEAR OH MOTHER MY TOES ARE SORE. See "O Dear Mother My Toes Are Sore."

           

DEAR OLD DAD. AKA and see "Old Fashioned Girl."

           

DEAR OONA [1]. AKA and see "Winnie Dear [2]."

 

DEAR OONA [2]. AKA and see "Dear Winnie."

           

DEAR PAPA AND DEAR MAMA. English, Country Dance Tune (3/4 time). G Minor. Standard tuning. AABC. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes), 1986.

           

DEAR ROSE. Irish, Air (4/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard tuning. One part. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 518, pg. 131.

X:1

T:Dear Rose

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 518

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

BA | G2 EG B2 cd | e2 f>d e3B | e>g fe c2 de | fd BB B2 ed | cB cd e2 fg |

Bc BA G2 B/G/A/F/ | EG Bc/d/ e2 cA | B>G EE E2 ||

           

DEAR SANDY. AKA and see “My Nanna’s Awa.” English, Waltz. G Major. Standard tuning. One part. The tune is contained in the 19th century Joseph Kershaw Manuscript. Kershaw was a fiddle player who lived in the remote area of Slackcote, Saddleworth, North West England, who compiled his manuscript from 1820 onwards, according to Jamie Knowles. The Joseph Kershaw Manuscript, 1993; No. 56.

                       

DEAR TOBACCO. English, Reel. England, Northumberland. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. ‘Dear Tobacco’ in the sense of expensive or hard-to-obtain tobacco. Hall & Stafford (Charlton Memorial Tune Book), 1974; pg. 20. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 179.

X:1

T:Dear Tobacco

L:1/8

M:C|

K:Ador

eAAc BG B2|eAAf gfed|eAAc BG B2|G2 GB dedB:|

|:efge fg a2|efge dedB|efge fg a2|G2 GB dedB:|

           

DEAR WHITE-BACKED BROWN COW [1], THE (Drimin Donn Dilis). Irish, Slow Air (6/8 time). D Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AA'. "Dr. Petrie has published the Ulster version of this air, with the Irish words, in his Ancient Music of Ireland (p. 115): I have given a Munster version (also with the Irish words) in my 'Irish Music and Song' (p. 38). The Munster version I five here differs from both, and is very characteristic and beautiful. The others end at 'A': but the rune is repeated here with some modifications" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 371, pg. 170.

X:1

T:Dear white-backed brown cow, The [1]

T:Drimin Donn Dilis

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow”

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs  (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D Mixolydian

FG|A2A2d2|d2e2 fd|e2c2A2|A2 [Ad][Be]|c2A2A2|c2d2 ed|

c2A2G2|E4 EG|F2E2D2|D2E2 AB|c2B2A2|E4 cd|e2d2c2|

A2B2 cA|G2E2D2|D4 AG|A2B2d2|d2e2 df|e2d2B2|A4 cd|

c2B2A2|c2d2 ed|c2A2G2|E4 G2|E2D2DC|D2E2 AB|

c2A2G2|E4 cd|ef e3d|c2A2G2|E2D2D2|D4||

 


DEAR WHITE-BACKED BROWN COW [2], THE (Drimin Donn Dilis). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 95, pg. 81 (appears as “Drimin Donn Dilis”).

           

DEAR WINNIE [1]. AKA and see "Winnie Dear [2]."

 

DEAR WINNIE [2]. AKA and see "Dear Oona [2]," "Una Aruin." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Dorian. Standard tuning. One part. "Many of the long notes are marked, in Forde's MS., with shakes, as Walsh played them on his violin: too many I think: and I have omitted them. As to the bar marked 'A', those who wish to avoid the ornamental notes will sinply play the four large notes. A very lovely melody" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 676, pgs. 338‑339.

           

DEAREST DICKY. AKA – “Dearest Dickie.” AKA and see “The Marquis of Harlington.” English, Morris Dance Tune (6/8 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AABBB, AABBB, AACCC, AACCC. A cornerdance and tune rom the village of Leafield, Oxfordshire, in England's Cotswolds. Leafield was called Fieldtown by the collector Cecil Sharpe, and the group of dances from that village are today known in morris circles as Fieldtown dances. The music was largely collected by Sharpe from a fiddler by the name of Frank Butler. The melody appears in the c. 1860’s music manuscript of William Tildesley (Swinton, Lancashire), under the title “The Marquis.” Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pg. 159. Mallinson (Mally’s Cotswold Morris Book), 1988; No. 21, pg. 16. Cottey Light Industries CLI-903, Dexter et al - "Over the Water" (1993). Fellside Records FECD192, Spiers & Boden – “Tunes” (2005).

X:1

T:Dearest Dicky

M:6/8

L:1/8

N:From the village of Leafield (Fieldtown), Oxfordshire

N:Form: AABBB, AABBB, AACCC, AACCC

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D|G2G BAB|cBc def|gfg/f/ edc|BAG FED|

G2G BAB|cBc def|gfg ABc|d3 d2:|

B/c/|dGB cde|cAB cBc|dGB cde|cAB c2d|

e2d eaf|g3 gfe|dcB AGF|GAG G2||

B/c/|dGB cde|cAB cBc|dGB cde|cAB c2d|

(2ed e3|(2ea f3|(2ga g3|(2gf e3|

(2dc B3|(2AG F3|(2GA G3|G3- G2||

           

DEAREST MARY. American, Song Tune. The melody was composed for a song for the minstrel stage.

           

DEARMUID UA UALLACAIN. AKA and see "Jerry Houlihan."

           

DEATAMUIL'S DAFICAD. AKA and see "Fair and Forty."

                       

DEATH AND THE COBBLER. AKA and see "A Cobbler There Was."

           

DEATH AND THE LADY. English, Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AB. According to Chappell (1859), this melody appears in two publications  of the early 18th century (A Guide to Heaven {1736} and Carey's Musical Century {1738}), and several ballad operas including Cobbler's Opera and The Fashionable Lady. It is mentioned twice in Goldsmith's 1776 volume The Vicar of Wakefield. Chappell believed the melody to be a corrupted version of the first part of the venerable "Fortune my foe."

***

Fair Lady, lay your costly robes aside,

No longer may  you glory in your pride;

Take leave of ev’ry carnal vain delight,

I’m come to summon you away this night.

***

Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Time), vol. 2, 1859; pg. 170.

X:1

T:Death and the Lady

L:1/8

M:C

S:Chappell – Popular Music of the Olden Time  (1859)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G>A|B3B B2d2|c2B2A2G2|A6 G>A|B3B B2e2|c2B2 A3G|G6||B>c|

d3B G2B2|c2B2A2G2|A6 G>A|B3B B2d2|c2B2 A3G|G6||

           

DEATH AND THE SINNER [1] (An Peacac Agus an Bas). AKA and see "The Night of My Wake", "Cold in My Coffin." Irish, Air (3/4 time). F Major/G Dorian. Standard tuning. AAB. O’Neill says he often heard his father sing this song which is a dialogue between “Death and the Sinner,” of which he remembered the following quatrain (from the Sinner):
***

The night of my wake there will be pipes and tobacco,

With snuff on a plate on a table for fashion’s sake;

Mold candles in rows like torches watching me,

And I cold in my coffin by the dawn of day.

***

Source for notated version: elderly fiddler Edward Cronin, “a Tipperary man from Limerick Junction” [O’Neill]. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 469, pg. 82.

X:1

T:Death and the Sinner [1]

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Moderate”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 469

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

AG|F2G2 AB|c4 fe|defdcA|G2 AGFD|B4 AG|A2 dcA^F|G2 A2|G4:|

||AB|c2d2 eg|f2 (d2d2)|g4 f2|g2 agfd|f2g2 af|g4 fe|defdcA|G2 AGFD|

f2g2 af|g4 fe|defdcA|G2 AGFD|B4 AG|A2 dcA^F|G4 A2|G4||

 


DEATH AND THE SINNER [2] (An Peacac Agus An Bas). Irish, Air (3/4 time). F Major/G Dorian (O’Neill/Roche): G Major/A Dorian (Ó Canainn). Standard tuning. AB (Roche): AAB (Ó Canainn, O'Neill). Source for notated version: Chicago police Sergeant Michael Hartnett, a neighbor of Chief O’Neill’s and the source of numerous airs [O’Neill]. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 73, pg. 64. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 470, pg. 82. Roche Collection, 1982; vol. 3, pg. 1, No. 2.

X:1

T:Death and the Sinner [2]

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Moderate”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 470

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

AG|F2G2 AB|c4 fe|d2c2 A>G|A F3 GA|B2A2 A>G|A d3 c>A|G4 (3AG^F|G4:|

||FA|c2d2 eg|f4 (3def|g2d2 cA|(G2 G2) Ac|f2g2 af|(g2g2) fe|d2c2A2|G>G G2 Ac|

f2g2 af|g4 fe|d2c2A2|G>A F2 GA|B4 AG|A d3 cA|G4 ^FA|G4||

                       

DEATH MARCH. Old-Time. Shanachie 6040, Gerry Milnes & Lorraine Lee Hammond – “Hell Up Coal Holler” (1999. “Old Currence Hammons whistled the ‘Death March’ for me to learn, than I heard Cletus Johnson play it on the banjo with verses. Old Sherman Hammons played a second part”).

                       

DEATH OF GENERAL WOLFE. Irish, Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard tuning. One part. General Wolfe led the British forces at the Plains of Abraham, Quebec, in 1757, where (as every English-speaking schoolboy learns) he won a great victory over the French but was slain at the height of his triumph.

***

“The Death of Wolfe” (1770), by Benjamin West.

***

A different air called “Death of General Wolfe” appears with lyrics in the music manuscript copybook of Henry Livingston, Jr.  Livingston purchased the estate of Locust Grove, Poughkeepsie, New York, in 1771 at the age of 23. In 1775 he was a Major in the 3rd New York Regiment, which participated in Montgomery’s invasion of Canada in a failed attempt to wrest Montreal from British control. An important land-owner in the Hudson Valley, and a member of the powerful Livingston family, Henry was also a surveyor and real estate speculator, an illustrator and map-maker, and a Justice of the Peace for Dutchess County. He was also a poet and musician, and presumably a dancer, as he was elected a Manager for the New York Assembly’s dancing season of 1774-1775, along with his 3rd cousin, John Jay, later U.S. Chief Justice of Governor of New York. Source for notated version: “From the Rev. J. Mease” (Rathmullen, Co. Donegal) [Stanford/Petrie]. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 365, pg. 92.

X:1

T:Death of General Wolfe, The

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Andante con spirito”

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 365

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

E2 | A3E A3B | c3d e3f | e6zd | c2e2d2c2 | B3A G2 {G}F2 | (E2F2) G4 |

A3E A2B2 | c3d e2f2 | e6d2 | c2e2d2c2 | B2 A2 G2F2 | E6 c2 | d3e f2c2|

d3B c2d2 | e6 d2 |c2e2 dc B>A | G2F2 EF G>A | A2 AA (B2 A>)G | A6 ||

 

DEATH OF MY FRIEND, THE ('Se so marbhrann mo charaid). Scottish, Slow Air (3/4 time). F Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. "This air was seemingly intended for application to the case of some individual who had lost a friend, breathing a soothing, plaintive strain, congenial with the natural feelings on such an event" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 94, pg. 36.

X:1

T:Death of my friend, The

T:’Se so marbhrann mo charaid

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

S:Fraser Collection  (1874)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Cmin

F>G|A2G2F2|F3z C>C|A2c2G2|F3z C>C|E2F2G2|B4e2|G6|E2 z2 F>G|

A2G2F2|F3z C>C|c2d2c2|B3z c>c|c2A2G2|F4B,2|C6|F2 z2:|

|:c>c|f2g2a2|g3z c>c|f2g2a2|g3z c>c|f2g2a2|g4e2|c6|f2 z2 F>G|A2B2c2|

e3z c>c|B2A2G2|E2 z2 e>e|c2A2G2|F4 B,2|C6|F2 z2:|

                       

DEATH OF MY PONY, THE. Irish, Air (6/8 time). G Major/E Minor. Standard tuning. AB. "Composed by a friar for the sad occasion (i.e. the song: not the air)" {Joyce}. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 762, pg. 375.

                       

DEATH OF STAKER WALLACE [1], THE. AKA – “Lament for Staker Wallace.” AKA and see “(An) Bean Dubh an Ghleanna” (The Dark Woman of the Glen). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Staker Wallace was born William Wallace or Wallis in 1733 at Tiermore, County Limerick, near the town of Kilfinnane. Several theories have been given to explain his curious nickname, ‘Staker’: one has to do with his sabatogueing of enclosures of common land by landlords in the latter half of the 18th century.  Wallace either drove stakes into the enclosure land to prevent mowing, or removed stakes used to fence the boundaries. Another explanation, printed in the notes for Leo Rowesome’s Claddagh LP for one, for the nickname ‘Staker’ is that during the rebellion of 1798 Wallace defended a breach in the walls of Limerick city armed only with at stake. Terry Moylan points out, however, that Limerick was quiet during 1798, although it was the site of a famous seige one hundred years previous. A final theory postulates that his nickname was earned after his lifetime on account of the circumstances of his death. Wallace, a 65 year old smallholder, was involved in the disturbances leading up to the uprising of 1798 and had become a leader of the local United Irishman, elected a captain. A charge was made against him by the Olivers of Castleoliver, to the effect that Wallace was trying to raise money to have the the local magistrate, member of Parliament and Yeomanry Captain, Charles Silver Oliver, assassinated. Although warned, Wallace could not make good his escape and was tried and convicted, not, however, before he was tortured by flogging for the names of other United Irishmen in the area. After his execution by hanging, he was decapitated and his head placed upon a stake (hence ‘Staker’) at the old castle of Kilfinnane, where it remained for several weeks until it was blown down on a windy night. His family collected it and buried it in the family plot, but his body had likely been buried in front of Kilfinnane jail. See also “Lament for Staker Wallace.” Roche Collection, 1912/1982; vol. 1, pg. 29, No. 58.

X:1

T:Death of Staker Wallace [1]

M:3/4

L:1/8

S:Roche Collection of Traditional Irish Music (Ossian)

Z:transcribed by Jeffrey Erickson

K:G

|:GE|D2 E>G GG/2A/2|BG/2E/2 D (5E/4G/4A/4B/4d/4 e>f|g2 (3fga g>e

|(3fed (3edB (3dBA|Bd/2B/2 A>B (9d/4B/4d/4B/4d/4B/4A/4G/4E/4|(3DEG G2:|

dB|A2 Bd de/2f/2|ga/2g/2 f>e fe/2f/2|ab/2g/2 fe d>g|

a/4g/4f/4g/4 e/4f/4e/4d/4 B/4A/4B/4d/4 e/4d/4e/4f/4 g/4f/4g/4a/4 b/4a/4g/4f/4

|g2 fg/2a/2 ge|(3fed (3edB (3dBA|B2 dB A2

|(6G/2E/2D/2E/2G/2A/2 B/2d/2e/2f/2 g>a|g2 (3fga g>e|(3fed (3edB (3dBA

|BG/4E/4 D/8E/8G/8B/8 A>B (9d/4B/4d/4B/4d/4B/4A/4G/4E/4|(3DEG G2|

 

DEATH OF STAKER WALLACE [2], THE. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). C Major. Standard tuning. One part. Source for notated version: fiddler Thresa Halpin (Limerick) [Darley & McCall]. Darley & McCall (Darley & McCall Collection of Irish Music/Feis Ceoil Collection), 1914; No. 4, pg. 2.

X:1

T:The Death of Staker Wallace

M:4/4

L:1/8

Q:1/4=69

R:air

Z:Gary Chapin

K:D

FG|A2d2 dcAF|A2d3 efe|dedc A2A2|A6 de|f3g a2 g2|fd d2 e3d|cAFG A2A2|A6 d

e|f3g a2 g2|fd d2 e3d| cAFG A2A2|A6 de|A2d2dcAF|A2d3 cAF|G3F D2D2|D8||

                       

DEATH VALLEY REUNION. American, Jig. A Major/Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB. According to Sue Songer (1997) the tune was composed by Gordon Euler (Portland, Oregon), on the occasion of a trip to Death Valley National Park for a reunion with family and musical friends. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 58.

                       

DEBBIE'S JIG. Canadian, Jig. B Flat Major ('A' part) & F Major ('B' part). Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Bernie Ley. Source for notated version: Jerry Robichaud (New Brunswick, Canada) [Hinds]. Hinds/Hebert (Grumbling Old Woman), 1981; pg. 28. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 150, pg. 99. Alcazar Dance Series ALC‑201, Jerry Robichaud ‑ "Maritime Dance Party" (1978). Fretless Records 201, Jerry Robichaud‑‑"Maritime Dance Party" (1978).

                       

DEBBIE'S WALTZ. Canadian, Waltz. Composed by Graham Townsend (Toronto).

           

DEBTOR’S SALUTATION, THE.  English, Air. The melody can be found in the Benjamin Cooke music manuscript (c. 1770), from the Frank Kidson collection. Beautiful Jo BEJOCD-36, Dave Shepherd & Becky Price – “Ashburnham.”

           

DECEITFUL STRANGER, THE. Irish, Air (6/8 time). B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AB. O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915; No. 40, pg. 28.

X:1

T:Deceitful Stranger, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

S:O’Neill’s Irish Music (1915)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:B_

D/E/ | FGB B>cd | dB G2 B/G/ | FDF GcB/c/ | dcB B2 B/c/ | dcB cGB | DCB, C2 D/F/ |

GBc dfe/d/ | {d}cBB B2 || d/e/ | dGc/d/ cFB | DCD/^F/ G2 G/A/ | BG^F Ged/c/ |

dBG F2 B/G/ | FGB B>cd | dcB/A/ G2 D/E/ | FDF GcB/c/ | dcB B2 ||

                       

DECEIVER. American, Reel. USA, Pennslyvania. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody has been recorded by Tracy Schwartz and Mike Seegar.

                       

DECEMBER DAY DANCE. English, Jig. D Minor. Standard tuning. AA (slow tempo) BBCCDD (fast tempo). Composed by editor Michael Raven. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 200.

                       

DECEMBER WALTZ. American, Waltz. G Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’C. Composed in 1991 by John Austin. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; pg. 28.

 

DECEPTION, THE (An Cluaineoracd). Irish, Air (6/8 time). D Major. Standard tuning. ABC. Composed by fiddler James O’Neill (b. 1863, originally from County Down & Belfast) who, while a sergeant on the Chicago police force in the first decade of the twentieth century, collaborated with Captain Francis O’Neill on Music of Ireland. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 323, pg. 56.

X:1

T:Deception, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow with feeling”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 323

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A/G/|FED A,CE|(D3 D2)E|F>GA/B/ cAc|(d3 d2)e|cBA GED|(C3 C2) D/E/|

FED A,CE|(D3 D2)||A|d2e f2e|d(A2 A2)B|c3 G2F|E (C2 C2)A|d2e f2e|

d(A2 A2)F|G2F D2D|D3 D2||D/E/|F>EF/A/ cAc|d>ef/e/ d2 d/e/|fed cAc|

(d3 d2)f|cAF GFD|(C3 C2)D/E/|FED A,CE|(D3 D2)||

           

DEDICATO A VARES. AKA and see “Viva el West Side.”

           

DEEL... See also "Deil...", "Deal...", or "Devil...".

                       


DEEL ASSIST THE PLOTTING WHIGS. English. Written by the famous English composer Henry Purcell. The title was derived from the first line of the song "'The Whigs' Lamentable Condition' or 'The Royalists' Resolution', to a pleasant new tune", which appeared in 180 Loyal Songs (1685 & 1694). The music alone was included in Musick's Handmaid (Part 2, 1689) as a "Scotch tune", though credit was given to Purcell, perhaps in imitation of the style. To further compound the confusion as to national origin, Chappell (1859) asserts this tune was appropriated by the Scots for their "Peggy, I must love thee." In Pills to Purge Melancholy the tune appears in adapted form for the song "Tom and Will were Shepherd Swains."

                       

DEEL OF THE DANCE. AKA and see "The Humours of Whiskey [2]," "Dever the Dancer," "The Bridge of Athlone [1]," "Humours of Derry," "The Crossroads Frolic," "The Peeler's/Policeman's Return," "Barranna mora Chlann Donncha."

                       

DE’ELS DEAD, THE. AKA and see “Birks of Abergelde.”

                       

DEEP WATERS. English, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 186.

X:1

T:Deep Waters

M:C|

L:1/8

K:G

B/c/ | dBdB gfge | dBdB G2 Bc | dBdB edcB | B2A2A3 B/c/ | dBdB gfge |

dBdB G3 B/c/ | dgfg ecAF | G2G2G3 :: f/g/ | abaf d2 dc | Bcde d2 fg |

abaf d2 dc | Bcde d2g2 | dBg2 dBg2 | dBdB G3B/c/ | dgfg ecAF | G2G2G3 :|

           

DEER FOOT. American, Hornpipe. USA, New England. F Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 107. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 71. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 144. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 14.

X:1

T:Deerfoot

M:C|

L:1/8

K:F

|:c2|cf af gc de|fe gf af ga|bg af gd ba|gf ed cB AB|

cf af gc de|fc af gc de|fe fd cB AG|F2A2F2:|

|:cB|Ac fe dc BA|BG gf ed cB|Ac ag fe dc|cB AB G2 cB|

Ac fe dB gf|ec ag fe dc|df ed cB AG|F2A2F2:|

 

DEER FOREST, THE. Scottish, Reel. D Minor. Standard. AA'BB'. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 229.

X:1

T:Deer Forest, The

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D Minor

c|A<ddf c>fAa|f>cAF G/G/G A2|1 A>ddf c>fAd|BG G/G/G FD D:|2

a>gfd cBAd|BG G/G/G FDD||D<GGB cBAc|B<GGB cAFA|1

D<GGB cBAd|BG G/G/G FDD:|2 Ad d/d/d cA A/A/A|BG G/G/G FDD||

           

DEER WALK [1]. AKA and see "Forked Deer." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, eastern Ky. The title is indigenous to eastern Kentucky; native Doc Roberts (1897‑1978), who recorded the tune in 1929, paid little attention to music outside the region (Wolfe, 1982) and the implication is that the tune’s provenace was that region. Charles Wolfe (1997) calls it one of Roberts’ masterpieces. It was played by fiddler Ernie Hodges in the 1930's and 40's and was recorded by him in 1976. County 412, "Fiddling Doc Roberts." Gennett 7049 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts (1930).

 

DEER WALK [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. D Major. Standard tuning. AB (Silberberg): AABB (Phillips, Songer). Sources for notated versions: Caroline Specht (Corvallis) [Songer]; Tony Mates [Silberberg]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 67. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 59. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 33.

           

DEERFOOT (HORNPIPE). AKA and see "Deer Foot."

           

DEERING STATION. Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black, named for the Chicago police station where Captain Francis O’Neill was posted, along with as many Irish musicians as he could entice into the force. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 15, pg. 8.

X:1

T: Deering Station

C: © B.Black

Q: 350

R: reel

M: 4/4

L: 1/8

K: G

D | D2 B,D E2 DE | G2 FG BddB | cBcd egdB | cBAG EDCE |

D2 B,D E2 DE | G2 FG BddB | cBcd eage | dBAB G3 :|

A | Bee^c dgga | bgaf gfed | Bee^c dege | dBAB G3 A |

Bee^c dgga | bgaf gfed | gb b2 eage | dBAB G3 :|

 

DEERNESS MERMAID, THE.  Scottish, March (2/4 time). Scotland, Orkney Islands. A Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB. A modern composition by Orcadian fiddler Jennifer Wrigley. Deerness is separated from the body of the East Mainland of Orkney by a narrow sandy isthmus. The Deerness Mermaid was sighted over a few summers during the 1890’s by hundreds of eyewitnesses, although since the creature remained some distance from shore, details are rather sketchy. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 106. Jennifer & Hazel Wrigley – “Skyran” (2001).

           

DEER'S ANTLERS. See "Caber Feigh."

           


DEER'S HORN(S), THE. See "Caber Féigh," "Caper Fey," "Padraig Reice," "The Castle Street Reel," "Glastertown's Downfall," "Copperplate [1]," “Rakish Paddy,” "Sporting Pat [1]."

                       

DEERWALK. See "Deer Walk."

           

DEFELLUM BLUES. The title is a corruption of “Deep Ellum Blues” (?) Voyager VRCD-354, Hart & Blech – “Build Me a Boat.”

                       

DEFIANCE [1]. American, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. “As performed by R. Tyson” states the note in Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883). Al Smitley suggests the tune may possibly have been named for either a warship, clipper ship or a bark called Defiance, a name that does appear in American Clipper Ships 1833-1858 by Howe and Matthews. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 94. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 129.

X:1

T:Defiance Hornpipe

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

(ED) | CEA,E (CE) (3ABc | (3dcB (3cBA GABd | ceAc defg | aecA B2 (ED) |

CEA,E (CE) (3ABc | (3dcB (3cBA GABd | cefg aefd | cABG A2 :|

|: (cd) | {f}ecea c’aec | {e}dcdg bgec | {e}dcda cBce | aece B2(cd) |

{f}ecea c’aec | gegb d’bge | e’c’ae c’aec | {g}fedB A2 :||

 

DEFIANCE [2], THE.  English, Jig. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody is unique to London publishers Charles and Samuel Thompson’s third collection of country dances (1773). Thompson (Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3), 1773; No. 3.

X:1

T:Defiance, The [2]

M:6/8

L:1/8

B:Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3 (London, 1773)

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bb

B|dfd BdB|cec AcA|Bcd FGA|B[Ff][Dd] [B,2B2]B|dfd BdB|c=ef gab|agf cd=e|fcA F2:|

|:f|fed “tr”c=Bc|[Cc]EG|cde|fdB BAB|[B,B]DF Bde|fed edc|def gab|fed cBA|B3 [B,2B2]:||

           

DEFRIGH LEIS AN gCÉACHTA. AKA and see "Speed the Plow [2]."

           

DEIRDRE COLLIS. Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB. From the playing of accordion player Billy McComiskey and fiddler Liz Carroll.

X:1

T:Deirdre Collis

R:Reel

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:G

GB~B2 dB~B2 | cdec dBGB |1c3e dB~B2 | AcBG AGED :|2 c3e dBGB | ADFA G4 ::\

dggf gdBd | d2BG AGEG | dggf gdBd | eaag agef |\

g2dg Bgdg | c2Bc AGEG | c3e dBGB | ADFA G4 :|

                       

DEIRDRE'S FAREWELL TO SCOTLAND. AKA and see "Deirdre's Lament for the Sons of Usneach."

                       

DEIRDRE'S LAMENT FOR THE SONS OF USNEACH. AKA - "Deirdre's Farewell to Scotland." Irish, Scottish; Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. One part: AABB (O’Farrell). The oldest extent piece of Irish music, given to the Irish collector Edward Bunting by Hempson, at ninety the last of the ancient brass-strung harpers, at the time of the 1792 Belfast Festival. Musically it makes use of parallel thirds and sixths and employs but six notes. The text of the ballad is mediaeval in origin and tells of Deirdre's sorrow at leaving the southwest Scottish locales of Glen Etive and Glen Massan and Glendaruel. Deirdre had been in happy exile with her lover Naisi in those lands, and both were to return to a tragic betrayal and death. The melody was first published in O’Farrell’s Pocket Companion, c. 1804-1816, the same tune as that printed in Bunting. Bunting (Ancient Music of Ireland), 1840. O’Farrell (Pocket Companion, vol III), c. 1808; pg. 37 (appears as “Deirdre’s Lamentation for the Sons of Usnoth”). Purser (Scotland’s Music), 1992; ex. 4, pg. 73. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 1019. RCA 09026-61490-2, The Chieftains - "The Celtic Harp" (1993).

X:1

T:Deirdre’s Lament

M:3/4

L:1/8

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 1019

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

GA|B3 AGE|DE G3 A/B/|c3 cBG|AGEDEG|A4 Bc|!
d2 g>e dB|A/G/E D3 D/E/|G{B}AGE DE|GABG ~A2|G4||

X: 2
T:The Lamentation of Dierdre for the Sons of Usnach
T:Dierdre's Lament
T:Neaill ghubh a Dheirde
M:3/4
L:1/4
Q:96
C:Unknown
S:The Ancient Music of Ireland, Edward Bunting 1840, pp. 83 ff
R:Air
O:Traditional
A:Ireland
B:Ancient Music of Ireland by Bunting 1840
H:A Very Old Air
K:G
(.G .D) (E3/4A/4) | (.G.G.G) | (.c .B)(A3/4G/4)| (.B .A)(B3/4A/4)|!
(.c .B)(B3/4A/4)|.A (G3/4E/4) .G|(.G .G) G3/4B/4|(.A .A) G3/4E/4|!
(.G.D)  (E3/4A/4) | (.G.G.G)| (.c .B) A3/4G/4| (.B .A) (c3/4D/4)|!
(.c.B) (B3/4c/4)|.c (A3/4E/4) .G| (.G .G) (G3/4B/4)|(.A .A) (G3/4E/4)||

                       

DEIL... See also "Devil...", "Deel..." or "Deal..."

           

DE'IL AMONG THE MANTUA-MAKERS. See "Devil Among the Mantua-Makers."

           

DEIL AMONG THE TAILORS, THE. See "Devil Among the Tailors."

           


DE'IL STICK THE/DA MINISTER. See "Deal/Devil Stick the Minister." AKA and see "This is no my ain Hoose," "This is no my ain Lassie," "Sean Triubhas." Scotland, Country Dance or Reel; Shetland, Shetland Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune is known throughout Scotland and the Shetlands, although in different versions, and is a very old melody from the days when covenanting ministers tried to stop fiddling as a "disreputable practice." A story goes that in one district the minister broke up all the fiddles except for one which a man, who could not bear to see his instrument destroyed, had hidden under a haystack. It was this unknown fiddler who supposedly composed the tune in protest of the destruction. The melody appears (as "Stick the Minister") in the Bodleian Manuscript (in the Bodleian Library, Oxford), inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland written at Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740." It was also included in the music manuscript collection of Northumbrian musician William Vickers (about whom, unfortunately nothing is known).  “Deil Stick” is a relative of "This is no my ain Lassie," as is the tune “Sean Truibhas,” and a similar melodic theme appears in "This is no my ain Hoose." Emmerson (1972) confirms that “Sean Truibhas,” or “Seann Triubhas Willighan,” is a set of  “Deil Stick.” The melodic association continues in the use of the “De’il Stick the Minister” for the dance called Sean Truibhas, so called because it was performed in tartan trousers rather than a kilt. Source for notated version: A. Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 22. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 210.

X:1

T:De’il Stick the Minister [1]

M:C|

L:1/8

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

|:Adfd e/e3/2ce|fdfd g2eg|fdfd e2ce|d2ed cAA2 :|

|:fgaf gagf |e=cgc ecgc|fgaf gece|d2ed cAA2:|

 

DE’IL STICK THE MINISTER [2].  Scottish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB’. From the 1770 music manuscript collection of Northumbrian musician William Vickers, about whom, unfortunately, nothing is known.

X:1

T:Deval Stick the Minister [2]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:William Vickers’ music manuscript collection (Northumberland, 1770)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Dorian

E|A/A/A Ac B2 EB|c2 BA BGGB|A/A/A Ac B2 EB|c2 BA GEE:|

|:B|egec dfdB|egec dBGB|1 egec dfdB|c2 BA BGG:|2 afge fdec|c2 BA GEE:|

 

DEIL TAK' THE BREEKS (O gràin air na briogaisean). Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB'CDD' (Fraser): ABB'CC'DD' (Athole). "There are words of various merit to this air, often imperfectly sung. Those which bear the name given in this work suit it best, and relate to some occasion the MacLeod family had for recruiting men, when the heir was a minor, and a lady the active instrument. The words profess the warmest attachment to her and the family interests" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 159, pg. 65. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 100.

X:1

T:Deil Tak’ the Breeks

M:C|

L:1/8

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

F || d2cB dFFA | BcdB AFFf | d2ec dAFd | AfdF E/E/EB2 |

d2CB dFFA | BcdB AFFa | fdec dAFd | AfdF E/E/EB2 ||

|| AFDF AFFB | AfdF AFFd | AFDF AFFd | AFdF E/E/EB2 |

AFDF AFFB | AfdF AFFd | fdec dAFd | AfdF E/E/Ebg ||

||fdcd AFFd | Bdcd AdFd | fdcd AFFd | BdAF E/E/Ebg |

fdcd AFFd | Bdcd AdFd | fdcd BdAd | FdAF E/E/EB2 ||

|| defg affb | afbg affb | defg affb | abaf e/e/eb2 | defg affb |

afbg affb | fdec dAFd | AfdF E/E/EB2 ||

 

DEIL TAK THE WARS. Scottish, Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). C Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody was printed by Henry Playford in his Second Part of the Dancing Master, a supplement to the 9th edition of the Dancing Master published in London in 1696. It appears in all subsequent Dancing Master editions through the 16th (1716). It was also published by John Walsh in his Compleat Country Dancing Master, editions of 1718, 1731 and 1754. The melody, somewhat altered from the Playford original, appears in the music manuscript collection of musician John Rook (Warerton, 1840), given as “Mark Yonder Pomp of Costly Fashions, or Deil Tak the Wars.” Rooks’ title is from a Robert Burns song written in 1795 and set to the melody of “Deil tak the wars,” printed by Thomson in the Scots Musical Museum. It begins:

***

Mark yonder pomp of costly fashion

Round the wealthy, titled bride:

But when compar’d with real passion,

Poor is all that princely pride.

What are the showy treasures?

What are the noisy pleasures?

The gay gaudy glare of vanity and art:

The polish’d jewel’s blaze

May draw the wond’ring gaze,

And courtly grandeur bright

The faney may delight,

But never, never can come near the heart.

***

Barlow (Compleat Country Dance Tunes from Playford’s Dancing Master), 1985; No. 374, pg. 89. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; pg. 28. Flying Fish FF358, Robin Williamson ‑ "Legacy of the Scottish Harpers." Wildgoose Records Belshazzar’s Feast – “Mr. Kynaston’s Famous Dance, vol. 2.”

X:1

T:De’il Take the Wars

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Playford – Supplement to the 9th edition of the Dancing Master (1696)

K:C

c2 c/d/e d3c|cGA/B/c G2E2|EGGc cdde|fedc d4|c2 c/d/e d3c|

cG A/B/c G2E2|EGGc cdde|g/f/e d>c c4::e2 e/f/g ecec|B2 B/c/d dBdB|

e2 ec d2 dB|c2 d/c/B/A/ A3G|E2G2 G/A/G cG|EG G/A/G G3G|

A2c2d3A|d>e dc B3A|G2 GE G2 cd|ge d>c c4:|

X:2

T:Mark Yonder Pomp of Costly Fashions, or Deil Tak the Wars

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:John Rook music manuscript (Warerton, 1840)

K:D

d2 df|{f}e3d|d>A Bc/d/|BAGF|FAAd|d2 de|fg/a/gf|f2e2|

d2df|fedc|d>A Bc/d/|BAGF|FAAd|d2 ag|f2 e>d/e/4|d2 zf|

fdfa|fd zd|ecea|ec ze|f2 fd|e2 ec|d>e f/e/d/c/|B3 d|A>BAF|A2 zA|

A>BAF|A2z A|Aeef|e3 f|gfed|{d}c3B|A>BAF|A2 ag|f2 e>d/e/4|d4||

                   

DEILADOIR, AN (The Wheelwright). AKA and see "The Wheelwright."

                   

DEILDY ABERTEIFI (Cardigan Bower). AKA – “Cardigan Bower.” Welsh, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB.

X:1

T:Deildy Aberteifi (Cardigan Bower)
M:6/8
L:1/8
R:Jig
K:D
dfe dAF | dfe dAF | Gee Gee | Ged cBA |!
dfe dAF | dfe dAF | Gee Ged | cBc d3:||!
fdf ecA | fdf ecA | Bcd efg | afd e3 |!
fdf ecA | fdf ecA | Bcd efg | ABc d3:||

                   

DEIL'S AWA' WI' THE EXCISEMAN. AKA and see "The London Gentlewoman," "The Hemp‑Dresser." Scottish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The title comes from a Robert Burns song written to the older tune ("The Hemp Dresser") dating to before 1650. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; No. 271, pg. 30.

X:1

T:De’il’s Awa wi’ the Exciseman, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 3, No. 271  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D|G2d ded|dcB ABc|d2G G2A|B3 d2D|GBd ded|

dcB ABc|d2G G2A|B3 d2::D|G2d d2d|c2B ABc|

d2G G2A|B3 d2D|G2d d2d|c2B A2d|g2d dec|B3 G2:|

                   

DEIL'S IN THE FISH, THE. English, Reel. England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard. ABCD (Charlton): AABBCCDD (Dixon). Composed by teacher, musician, composer, dancing master and fiddler Robert Whinham (1814-1893), originally from Morpeth. Source for notated version: the T. Armstrong manuscript (c. 1850), contained in the John Armstrong of Carrick collection [Dixon]. Dixon (Remember Me), 1995; pg. 19. Hall & Stafford (Charlton Memorial Tune Book), 1974; pg. 54.

                   

DEIRBSIUIRACA SUGACA, NA. AKA and see "The Merry Sisters."

                   

DEIRCTHEOIR, AN (The Beggar). AKA and see “The Beggar,” "The Beggarman," “Duke of Aberdeen.” Irish, Air (2/4 time). B Flat Major. Standard. One part. A version of the popular and common British Isles' "Beggarman" or "Little Beggerman" family of tunes. Source for notated version: the Irish collector Edward Bunting obtained the melody from another collector, Dr. George Petrie, in 1839. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 82, pgs. 125-126.

 

DEIRE AN FOGMAIR. AKA and see "The Harvest Home [1]."

 

DEIRE NA CUPLAIDE. AKA and see "The Last of the Twins."

 

DEIREAD AN LAE. AKA and see "The End of the Day."

 

DEISIG AN COINNEAL! AKA and see "Top the Candle."

                   


DEL CARO’S FANCY. British Isles, Reel. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Madam Del Caro was an entertainer of the late eighteenth century. Huntington (William Litten's), 1977; pg. 19.

                   

DEL CARO’S HORNPIPE. AKA and see “Early one morning,” “Madame Del Caro’s Hornpipe.” English, Hornpipe. G Major: A Major [Kershaw]. Standard tuning. AABB. Maria del Caro was a famous dancer of the late 18th, early 19th centuries. The tune was the first published composition of a very young John Field (1782-1837), an Irish pianist and composer, a pupil of Clementi, who spent much of his mature life in Russia. “Del Caro’s Hornpipe”, written when he was aged 15, was published by London publisher Broderip in 1797 (as “Del Caro’s Hornpipe with Variations”).

***

John Field (1782-1837)

***

The tune is contained in the 19th century Joseph Kershaw Manuscript. Kershaw was a fiddle player who lived in the remote area of Slackcote, Saddleworth, North West England, who compiled his manuscript from 1820 onwards, according to Jamie Knowles. There is a “Madame Del Caro’s Hornpipe” in the William Mittell manuscript (1799). The Joseph Kershaw Manuscript, 1993; No. 42.

X:1

T:Del Caro’s Hornpipe

M:C

L:1/8

S:Broderip (1797)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G>Bd>g f>ed>e | d>cB>A B>c d2 | G>Bd>g f>ed>e | d>cB>A G2 G2 :|

G>Bd>g e>f g2 | D>FA>c B>c d2 | G>Bd>g e>f g2 | B>AG>F G2G2 :|

                   

DELACHAPLE'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing of this tune in Angus Cumming's 1780 collection (pg. 3).

                   

DELAHANTY'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Delahunty's Hornpipe."

                   

DELAHUNTY'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Delahanty's Hornpipe," "The Home Brew," “The Iron Gate,” “John Quinn’s [1],” “The Kerry Hornpipe [1],” "The Road to Boyle,” "Sonny Murray's," "Wicklow Hornpipe.” Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Also called “A Kerry Hornpipe” in Treoir (III, pg. 11). See also the variant “Charlie is Welcome Home” (Goodman). Sources for notated versions: Fred Breunig (Putney, Vt.) [Miller]; sessions at the Regent Hotel, Leeds, England [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, vol. 1, No. 67. Cotter (Traditional Irish Tin Whistle Tutor), 1989; 78. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 78, pg. 32. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; vol. 1, No. 61. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 2nd Edition, 2006; pg. 116. Copely Records 9-114 (78 RPM), Paddy Cronin (195?). Shanachie 79023, "Chieftains 3" (1971/1982). Tulla Ceili Band, "Ireland Green" (EMI?)L.E. McCullough, "120 Fav. Irish Session Tunes"

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:Delahunty’s Hornpipe

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

K:D

FG|ABAF DEFG|AGAB =c2 (3AB^c|dcde fdAF|G2 ({A}G)F G2 FG|

A/B/-c AF DEFG|~A3B =c2 (3AB^c|d2 de fdAG|(F/G/F)D2 D2:|

|:de|~f3d edAF|G2 gf g2 fg|agab agec|dcAF G2 FG|

ABAF DEFG|AGAB =c2 (3AB^c|dcde fdAG|F2D2D2:|

X:2

T:Wicklow Hornpipe, The

R:Road to Boyle, The

T:Homebrew Hornpipe, The

R:hornpipe

N:Bar 4 also played |DG~G2 DGGB|

D:John Williams

Z:id:hm-hornpipe-51

Z:transcribed by henrik.norbeck@mailbox.swipnet.se

M:C|

L:1/8

K:D

FG|ABAF DEFG|AGFD =c2 (3AB^c|dcde fdAF|DGGF G2FG|

ABAF DEFG|AGFD =c2 (3AB^c|dcde fdAG|F2D2D2:|

|:de|~f3d ecAF|Gggf g2 (3efg|agab agec|dcAF G2FG|

ABAF DEFG|AGFD =c2 (3AB^c|dcde fdAG|F2D2D2:|

“Version 2:”

FG|A2 AF DEFG|AFed =c2 (3AB^c|d2 de fdAG|EGGA G2FG|

ABAF DEFG|AGAB =c2 (3AB^c|d2 de fdAG|F2D2D2:|
|:de|f2fd edcA|defd g2 (3efg|a2 ab agef|dcAB G2FG|

A2AF DEFG|AFed =c2 (3AB^c|d2 de fdAG|F2D2D2:|

                   

DELANEY'S DRUMMERS (Dromadoiri Uí Dunlainge). AKA and see “Clare Jig [1],” “Jug of Brown Ale,” “Mug of Brown Ale [1],” “Paddy in London [2],” “Winter Apples [2].” Irish, Double Jig. A Dorian (O’Neill): A Mixolydian (Feldman & O’Doherty). Standard tuning. AABB (Feldman & O’Doherty): AABB' (O’Neill). Source for notated version: fiddler Peter Turbit [Feldman & O’Doherty]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), vol. 3; No. 57. Cotter (Traditional Irish Tin Whistle Tutor), 1989; No. 82. Feldman & O’Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1978; pg. 231 (appears as last “Untitled Jig” on page). Giblin (Collection of Traditional Irish Dance Music), 1928; No. 82. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1986; No. 305, pg. 65.

X:1

T:Delaney’s Drummers

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 305

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Dorian

g/f/|eAA fAA|gfg age|dBG GFG|BAG Bcd|eAA FAA|BAB gfe|def gdB|BAA A2:|

|:d|efg a2a|baf gfe|def gfg|agf ged|1 efg abc’|baf gfe|def gdB|BAA A2:|2

bag agf|gfe fdB|def gdB|BAA A2||

                   

DELANEY'S CLOG. AKA and see "Londonderry Clog," "Showman's Clog."

                   

DELANEY'S FAVORITE. AKA and see "The Londonderry Hornpipe."

                   

DELANEY'S FROLICS. AKA and see “The Dunboyne Straw-Plaiters,” “Ha’p’orth of Tea.” Irish, Reel. D Mixolydian (‘A’ part) & D Major (‘B’ part). Standard tuning. AAB. The tune was named for Chicago piper Barney Delaney, a contemporary of collector and flute player Captain Francis O’Neill. Delaney was O’Neill’s brother-in-law, who found him a job on the Chicago police force. O’Neill was critical of Delaney, however, not for his piping ability, which he respected, but for his miserliness with tunes which O’Neill feared would by lost when Delaney died. “Delaney’s Frolics” was first recorded about the year 1900 by piper Patsy Tuohey, on a privately made and issued cylinder recording. Tuohey, originally from Galway, was the outstanding professional piper of his era and managed to make a living touring the United States along with his wife. The first publication of the melody was in P.W. Joyce’s Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909), under the title “The Dunboyne Straw-Plaiters,” obtained from a Dublin piper who had picked up the tune in North Kildare. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 242. Tara CD4011, Frankie Gavin – “Fierce Traditional” (2001).

X:1

T:Delaney's Frolics

M:4/4

L:1/8

S:Capt. F. O'Neill

Z:Paul Kinder

R:Reel

K:D Mix

c|:B2 Bc A2 Bc|dBcA BE ~E2|B2 Bc A2 fg|afeg fd d2:||

K:D

fddc dfaf|gfed cdeg|fddc defd|eaag ed d2|

fddc dfaf|gfed cdeg|f2 fd g2 ge|afge fd d2||

                   

DELANEY'S JIG. AKA and see “Lambert’s Jig [2],” “Leitrim Jig [3],” “The Tynagh Jig.” Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The title refers to renowned piper Denis Delaney of Ballinasloe.

X:1

T:Delaney's

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

K:G

A2 A DED|AFA dcA|GEE cEE| G2 E DEG| A2 A DED|AFA dcA|GEE cEE|DED D2 B:||

Adc ABd|ecA dcA| GEE cEE| G2 E DEG| Adc ABd| ecA dcA|GEE cEE|DED D3 :||

                   

DELANEY'S REEL. Irish, (Single) Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915; No. 301, pg. 150.

X:1

T:Delaney’s Reel

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – O’Neill’s Irish Music (1915)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

(3ABc | d2 cA BE E2 | FDAD FABc | d2 cA BE E2 | (3Bcd ed cABc | d2 cA BE E2 |

FDAD FABc | d2 cA BE E2 | (3Bcd ed cABc || d2 fd adfd | d2 fd cd e2 | d2 fd adfd |

dBAF EF A2 | d2 fd adfd | d2 fd cd e2 | (3ded fd (3cdc ec | dBAF EFAc ||

                   

DELAWARE COUNTY BLUES. Rounder 0437, Alton Jones  – “Traditional Fiddle Music of the Ozarks, vol. 3: Down in the Border Counties.”

                   


DELAWARE HORNPIPE. American, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. One of the tunes cited by Lettie Osborn (New York Folklore Quarterly) as having commonly been played for dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's. The name Delaware comes from Thomas, Lord de la Warr, the first Governor of Virginia, a courtier and soldier who as a young man had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. At first the bay was named for him, then a river emptying into it was discovered and also given the same name, and finally the region was named for the river (Matthews, 1972). There was an early man-of-war named the Delaware, although what connection, if any, with this tune is unknown. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 86. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 119.

X:1

T:Delaware Hornpipe

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

(d/c/) | B/G/B/d/ B/G/B/d/ | g/f/g/e/ d/B/G/B/ | e/c/d/B/ c/A/B/G/ | EAA (d/c/) | B/G/B/d/ B/G/B/d/ |

g/f/g/e/ d/B/G/B/ | e/c/d/B/ c/A/B/G/ | DGG :: g | d/g/B/g/ d/g/B/g/ | d/g/b/a/ g/f/e/d/ |

e/a/c/a/ e/a/c/a/ | e(a/g/) f/e/d/^c/ | d/g/B/g/ d/g/B/g/ | d/g/b/a/ g/f/e/d/ | e/a/b/a/ g/f/e/f/ | ggg :|

 

DELGATY CASTLE.  Scottish, Country Dance Tune. A Major. Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. Composed by Kirkmichael, Perthshire, fiddler and composer Robert Petrie (1767-1830). Delgaty is an estate with a mansion in north Aberdeenshire, near Turriff, and holds the distinction of being Scotland’s oldest lived-in castle. The castle was built around 1579, perhaps incorporating an older structure, and was originally the property of the Hays of Erroll. In 1762 it was sold to Peter Garden, Esq. of Troup; as Petrie was an employee of the Garden family at Troup, Banffshire (his 2nd Collection is dedicated to Mrs. Garden of Troup), it is likely he came into contact with the Delgaty branch of the family. It was sold to Alexander Duff (1778-1851), who long made it his residence. Petrie (Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances), 1790; pg. 15.

X:1

T:Delgaty Castle

C:Robert Petrie

S:Petrie's Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances &c., 1790

Z:Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick'at'astound'dot'net>, 3/19/04

N:Petrie's First Collection, page 15

L:1/8

M:2/4

R:Reel?

K:A

"^Allegro"

c/d/ | ecA>c | B/A/G/F/ EA/=G/ | FB/A/ Gc/B/ | Ad/c/ TcB |

ecAc | B/A/G/F/ EA/=G/ | FB G/E/d/B/ | c/B/A/G/ [CEA] :|

"^Pia."

|:c/d/ | eecA | ff{e}d{c}B | eecA | "^ For."aG/A/B/G/ E2 | eecA |f>gad | cBAG  | AA[CEA] :|

K:Am

"^Minore Pia."

|:E | AAAB | cccd | "^For."e/f/e/d/ c/d/c/B/ | AEA,E |

"^Pia."

AAAB | cccd | eefd |"^For."[^G2B2e2] [^GBe] :|

|: e |ee eg/e/ | fdD2 | dd df/d/ | ec Cc/d/ |

"^Pia."

eeef | dfed | "^For."cBA^G | AA [CEA] :|

 

DELGATY ICE HOUSE.  Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. The tune was included by Kirkmichael, Perthshire, fiddler and composer Robert Petrie (1767-1830) in his 2nd Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances (1796), described as “An auld Tune”.

X:1

T:Delgaty Ice House

C:"An auld Tune"

S:Petrie's Second Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances &c.

Z:Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick'at'astound'dot'net>, 6/11/04

N:Petrie's Second Collection, page 21

% Gore's Index has no other citation for this tune

L:1/8

M:C

R:Strathspey

K:D

"^Slow"

A,|D>EFF F>EDF |A2 (B/A/G/F/) FEEF|D>EFF  F>ED>F|B>cdB AFF:|

g |fae>f dfBd  |B/A/G/F/ dF   FEEg|f>ae>f d>fB>d|B/A/G/F/ dB AFFg|

f>ae>g d>fB>d|B/A/G/F/ d>F  FEEF|D>EFF  F>EDF |B>cd>B AFF|]

 

DELGATY KNELL. Scottish, Jig. G Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Kirkmichael, Perthshire, fiddler and composer Robert Petrie (1767-1830). The melody was included in his 2nd Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances, 1796, dedicated to his patron and employer, Mrs. Garden of Troup (Banffshire).

X:1

T:Delgaty Knell

C:R. Petrie

S:Petrie's Second Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances &c.

Z:Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick'at'astound'dot'net>, 6/5/04

N:Petrie's Second Collection, page 9

L:1/8

M:6/8

R:Jig

K:Gm

(d//=e//^f)|g2d (B/c/dB)|G3  G2 A/B/|cAF fcA|cAF F2^f|g2d (B/c/dB)|G3  G2g/a/|bag dg^f|g3 g2:|

 d|gdg  bag |gdg bag |fcf agf|fcf agf |gdg  bag|gdg bgf   |bag dg^f|g3 G2d|

 gdg  bag |gdg bag |fcf agf|fcf agf |BdB  AcA|BAG g2a   |bag dg^f|g3 g2|]

 

DELIA O’BRIEN’S.  Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Cape Cod banjo player, composer, writer and session leader Bill Black. Treoir, vol. 38, No. 3 & 4, 2006; pg. 33.

X:1

T:Delia O’Brien’s

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

C:Bill Black

K:G

D|GFG BcB|BAB AGE|GBd ege|edB gdB|GFG B2d|

C2A BGE|DGB dBd|cAF G2::d|edB ABd|gfg afd|

g2b age|edB AGA|BGG cAA|d^cd efg|DGB dBd|cAF G2:||

 

DELIA, OR THE AMOROUS GODDESS.  English, Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. ABC. Composed by Samuel Howard (1710-1782), a chorister of the Chapel Royal and organist at two London churches. He composed an opera, The Amorous Goddess, in 1744, in which the song “Delia” appears, beginning: “Delia, in whose form we trace…”  London publisher I. Walsh published the opera in 1744. The song melody was also printed in John Simpson’s Calliope, or English Harmon, vol. 2 (London, 1746), John Sadler’s The Muses Delight (Liverpool, 1754), John Johnson’s Compleat Tutor for the Hautboy (London, 1750) his Compleat Tutor for the German Flute (London, 1760). Simpson gives “Mr. Howard” as the composer of the tune, and indicates it is “Mr. Howard’s Favorite Musette.” Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2). 2005; pg. 29.

X:1

T:Delia, or the Amorous Goddess

M:4/4

L:1/8

C:Samuel Howard

K:D

A2|d2 d/e/rf e2 ac|d2 g<e d2c2|dA B=c B^c d2|e/f/g f2 e4|d2 d/e/f e2 ac|

d2 g<e d2c2|dA B=c B2 ge|d2c2 d4||c2 d/e/f e2 dc|d2 cB c4|ec BA F^G A2|

d2c2B4|e2 df e2 dc|d2 bd c4|ec BA F2 dB|A2^G2 A4||d2 d/e/f e2 ac|d2 g<e e2c2|

dA B=c B^c d2|e/f/g f2e4|d2 d/e/f e2 ac|d2 g<e d2c2|dA B=c B2 ge|d2 c>B/2c/4 d4||

 

DELIDA POLKA. American, Polka. USA, Michigan. Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer played by Chet Parker" (1966).

         

DELIGHT IN DISORDER. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Mullaghbawn, south County Antrim, fiddler and piano player Josephine Keegan (b. 1935). Keegan (The Keegan Tunes), 2002; pg. 22.

                   

DELIGHT OF SUDBURY, THE.  English, Country Dance Tune (2/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody was first published in Charles and Samuel Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 2 (London, 1765). Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; pg. 29. Thompson (Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 2), 1765; No. 146.

X:1

T:Delight of Sudbury, The

M:C

L:1/8

B:Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 2 (London, 1765)

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

[G2D2B2g2] fe dBAG|ABcA BGFG|{ef}g2 fe dBAG|ABcA “tr”B2A2:|

|:(DF)(FA) (Ac)(cB)|(Bd)(dg) (gd)(cB)|(ec)(ge) (dB)(gB)|AcBA G2 [G,2G2]:||

 

DELIGHT OF THE MEN OF DOVEY, THE. AKA and see "Difyrrwch Gwyr Dufi."

                   

DELIGHT OF THE MEN OF MAWDDWY, THE. AKA and see “Difyrrwch Gwyr Mawddwy.”

                   

DELIGHTS OF INCHICORE, THE. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black, named for the Inchicore district of Dublin. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 237, pg. 127.

X:1

T: Delights of Inchicore

C: © B. Black

Q: 325

R: jig

M: 6/8

L: 1/8

K: G

A | DGA BAG | ABA AFE | DGB d^cd | ed^c d2 A |

DGA BAG | ABA ABc | ded cAF | AGF G2 :|

A | dgg fgg | fga gdc | BGB cBc | de^c d2 A |

dgg aga | bag fdc | Bcd cAF | AGF G2 :|

         

DELIGHTS OF THE BOTTLE. English, Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AB. The song appears in the last act of composer Matthew Lock's English opera Psyche (1675). Playford published it in his Choice Ayres, and was arranged as a duet in his Pleasant Musical Companion (1687). As with many popular airs, many songs were written to it and it appears under one title or another in many collections of the era. Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Times), Vol. 2, 1859; pgs. 28‑29.

         

DELLAGYLE. Scottish. The melody was composed by Charles Grant (b. Strondhu, Knockando, 1806‑1892) and is the name of a famous salmon pool on the River Spey.

         

DELL'S DELIGHT WALTZ. American, Waltz. C Major ('A' and 'B' parts) & G Major ('C' and 'D' parts). Standard tuning. ABCD. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 143.

         

DELNABO. Scottish, Strathspey. E Minor (Skinner): E Dorian (Perlman). Standard tuning. AAB (Skinner): AABB (Perlman). Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Source for notated version: Kenny Chaisson (b. c. 1947, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Rollo Bay) [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 198. Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904; pg. 64. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 49. Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier ‑ "The Dances Down Home" (1977).

X:1

T:Delnabo

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Skinner – The Scottish Violinist

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

B, | (E2 G>E) (G>EG>E) | ({G}A2 =G>E) (F>D D2) | {F}G2 B>(G d>)(GB>)(G |1

A/)B/c B>A G>E E :|2 A/)B/c B>^d e>E E || f | (g/f/e) (B>^d) e>fg>e |

d>f A>d F>A D>f | (g/f/e) (B>^d) e>fg>e | f<c’ b>a g<e e>f | (g/f/e) (B>^d) e>f .g/.f/.e |

d>(fA>)(d F>)(AD>)(F | (3G)FE (3AGF (3BAG (3cBA | B>e ^d>b g<e [Be] ||

         

DELNADAMPH LODGE. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning (or ADae, a la Allie Bennett). AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. The tune has been recorded by the Barra MacNeils and Jerry Holland. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 10, pg. 4. Rounder CD 11661-7033-2, Natalie MacMaster – “My Roots are Showing” (2000). Allie Bennett – “Its About Time” (2004).

         

DELRACHNIE'S RANT. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. A note in Walker (1866) says "very old." Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 168, pg. 58.

         

DELTING BRIDAL MARCH. Shetlands, March (6/8 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AB. In the Shetland Islands it was the custom for fiddlers at weddings to lead the bridal party to and from the church. Delting is the Mainland Sheltand district between Olna Firth and Dales Voe. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 341.

         


DELTINGSIDE. AKA and see "Delvin Side [2]" (Delvinside). Shetland. Shetland, Unst and Mainland districts.

         

DELVIN HOUSE [1]. Scottish, Reel or Strathspey. C Major. Standard tuning. AB (Surenne): AAB (Skye): AABB' (Kerr): AABBCD (McGlashan). Credited to Niel Gow (1727-1806) by MacDonald. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 2; No. 96, pg. 13 (strathspey). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 118 (reel). McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg. 33. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852; pg. 97.

X:1

T:Delvin House [1]

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel or Strathspey

S:MacDonald – Skye Collection  (1887)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

e|~c2 Ge ~c2 GE|D>(dd>)c B>GA>B|c>ed>e c>eA>c|G>AG>E G(cc):|

e/f/|gece ce/f/ge|afdf df/g/af|gece gecA|A>fe>d ecce/f/|gece ce/f/ge|

afdf cf/g/af|e>gd>e c>dA>c|G>AG>E G(cc)||

 

DELVIN HOUSE [2]. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. O’Farrell (Pocket Companion, vol. III), c. 1808; pg. 1. O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915; No. 182, pg. 100.

X:1

T:Delvin House [2]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:O’Farrell – Pocket Companion, vol. III (c. 1808)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D/E/ | GGG GGG | GBd dBG | GAG GAG | ABd e2g | dBG GAB | Bge dBG |

(AGA) (BAB) | GEE E2D || g>ag (gab) | dBg dBG | g>ag (gab) | age e2d |

g>ag (gab) | dBg dBG | (AGA) (BAB) | GEE E2D | g>ag (gab) | dBg dBG |

(gfg) (aga) | (bag) e2d | g>ab e>fg | dBg dBG | (AGA) (BAB) | GEE E2 ||

 

DELVIN HOUSE [3]. Scottish, Jig. A Major. Standard tuning. AAB. The tune appears in the 3rd collection of Malcolm MacDonald of Dunkeld, a volume dedicated to Miss Drummond of Perth. It also was printed in John and Andrew Gow’s A Collection of Slow Airs, Strathspeys and Reels (London, c. 1795). Andrew (1760-1803) and younger brother John (1764-1826) established a publishing business in London in 1788 and were the English distributors for the Gow family musical publications. Source for notated version: John & Andrew Gow’s Collection (c. 1792) [S. Johnson]. S. Johnson (A Twenty Year Anniversary Collection), 2003; pg. 22. MacDonald (A Third Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1792; pg. 12.

See also listing at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

X:1

T:Delvin House [3]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:MacDonald – 3rd Collection of Strathspey Reels (c. 1792)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

e3 ecA | F2 F “tr”F2E | FGA ECA, | B,2B, B,2A, | e3 ecA | F2F F2E | FGA ECA, | B,3 A,3 :|

|: (e3 e)cA | (f3 f)ga | e2(e e)cA | GBB “tr”B3 | e2(e e)cA | (f3 f)ga | efe edc | “tr”B3 A2 :|

 

DELVON SIDE [1]. Scottish, Jig. G Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 93, No. 156.

 

DELVIN SIDE [2]. AKA – “Delvine Side.” AKA and see "Deltingside" (Shetland). Scottish, Strathspey. E Dorian. Standard tuning. AB (Surenne): AAB (most versions): AABB' (Kerr). Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing of the tune in Alexander McGlashan's 1780 collection (pg. 30), although it appears soon after several period publications, including Philadelphia publisher B. Carr’s Caledonian Muse (1798) and Gow’s Complete Repository (1799). It appears as well in the John Fife music manuscript book of c. 1780-1804. Fife was evidently a seaman whose home may have been in Perthshire (Keller), and his manuscript seems to have been written at sea as well as at home. Source for notated version: a c. 1847 music manuscript by Ellis Knowles, a musician from Radcliffe, Lancashire, England [Plain Brown]; “From McGlashan’s Collection” [Johnson, Skinner]. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 15. Johnson (A Twenty Year Anniversary Collection), 2003; pg. 12. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; Set 7, No. 3, pg. 6. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 83. Plain Brown Tune Book, 1997; pg. 55. Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904; pgs. 62-63 (includes numerous variation sets). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 246. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852; pgs. 106-107. Marquis 81245-2, David Greenberg – “Tunes Until Dawn” (2000).

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources

X:1

T:Delvine (sic) Side [2]

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection   (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

B,|:E>e d/^c/B/A/ B<E B>A|B<E e/^c/B/A/ d>DA>F|E>e d/^c/B/A/ B<E B>e|(3fdf (3e^ce d<D A>F:||

d>EB>E d>EB>e|d>EB>E d>BA>F|d>EB>E d>EB>e|(3fdf (3e^ce d<D A>F|

dEBE d>EB>e|d>EB>E d>BA>F|E>FG>A B>^cd>e|(3fbf (3ege (3d^cB (3AGF||

X:2

T:Delvin Side [2]

S:Petrie's Second Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances &c.

Z:Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick'at'astound'dot'net>, 6/11/04

N:Petrie's Second Collection, page 20

L:1/8

M:C

R:Strathspey

K:Bm

E>e d/B/A/B/ d<EB>A |E>e d/B/A/B d<DA>F|E>e d/B/A/B/ dEEg |f<ae<f d<DA>F :|

d<EB<E d<E TB>A|d<EB<E d<EA>F|d<EB<E d<EE>g|f/g/a/f/ e/f/g/e/ dD B/A/G/F/|

d<EB<E d<E TB>A|d<EB<E d<EA>F|d<EB<E d<EE>g|f/g/a/f/ e/f/g/e/ dD B/A/G/F/|]

 

DELVIN SIDE [3]. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 4; No. 67, pg. 10.

X:1

T:Devlin Side [3]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 4, No. 67

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

DCDE FEFA | dFAF dFAF | E/E/E (ED) EFGA | (3Bcd (AF) FEEF |

DCDE FEFA | dFAF dFAg | faef deBd | AFEF D2A2 ||

|: defg afdg | (3faf (df) a2 (gf) |1 e^def gfgf | (3efg (fa) g2 (fe) :|2 gbef deBd | AFEF D2d2 ||

 

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

© 1996-2009 Andrew Kuntz

Please help maintain the viability of the Fiddler’s Companion on the Web by respecting the copyright.

For further information see Copyright and Permissions Policy or contact the author.

 

 


 [COMMENT1]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT2]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - On.

 [COMMENT3]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT4]Note:  The change to pitch (12) and font (1) must be converted manually.