The Fiddler’s Companion

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

_______________________________

HOME        ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

PEA - PER

 

 

Notation Note: The tunes below are recorded in what is called “abc notation.” They can easily be converted to standard musical notation via highlighting with your cursor starting at “X:1” through to the end of the abc’s, then “cutting-and-pasting” the highlighted notation into one of the many abc conversion programs available, or at concertina.net’s incredibly handy “ABC Convert-A-Matic” at

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html 

 

**Please note that the abc’s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc conversion programs. For example, I use abc2win and abcNavigator 2 with no problems whatsoever with direct cut-and-pasting. However, due to an anomaly of the html, pasting the abc’s into the concertina.net converter results in double-spacing. For concertina.net’s conversion program to work you must remove the spaces between all the lines of abc notation after pasting, so that they are single-spaced, with no intervening blank lines. This being done, the F/C abc’s will convert to standard notation nicely. Or, get a copy of abcNavigator 2 – its well worth it.   [AK]

 

 

 

PEA PATCH JIG. AKA and see "Mechanics' Hall Jig." American, Dance Tune (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. ABB. Composed by Ohio (minstrel) Dan Emmett in 1845. A 'jig' was an old‑time name for a kind of syncopated banjo tune, likely derived from the usage of ‘jig’ as a generic dance, or, just possibly, as a derogatory association with African-American dancing. These kinds of ‘jig’ tunes, prevalent in the Howe/Ryan publications and similar mid-19th century volumes, have nothing to do with the Irish 6/8 jig, for these tunes were always in 2/4 time. Howe categorizes the melody as a schottische. See note for “Camp Meeting [1]” for a sketch of Emmett. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 82. Howe (1000 Jigs and Reels), c. 1867; pg. 53. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 114.

X:1

T:Pea Patch Jig

M:2/4

L:1/8

C:Dan Emmett

R:Schottische

S:Howe – 1000 Jigs and Reels (1867)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

E |: (3A/A/A/A z/A/G/B/ | z/A/d/f/ e2 | (3f/f/f/f z/e/d/e/ |1 z/c/d/B/ A/F/E/D/ :|2

z/c/d/B/ AA, |: z/A/G/E/ C/A,/z | z/A/G/E/ C/A,/z | z/A/G/E/ C/D/E/F/ |

^G/E/F/D/ C/A,/z/A2 :: _B2A, z/ A,2 | z/A/F/D/ C/A,/z/ A,2 | _B2 A, z/ A,2 |

z/A/F/D/ C/A,/z/ A,2 | A/^g/{b}a/e/ c/A/B/^G/ | A/^g/{b}a/e/ c/A/B/^G/ |

A/f/{a}g/e/ d/B/G/B/ | A/f/{a}g/e/ d/B/G/B/ :: A/a/(3a/a/a/ c/a/B/a/ |

A/a/(3a/a/a/ c/a/B/a/ | A/g/(3g/g/g/ d/g/B/g/ | A/g/(3g/g/g/ d/g/B/g/ :|

                       

PEA SOUP (La soupe aux pois). AKA and see "Woodchopper's Reel."

                       

PEA STRAW. AKA and see "Pease Strae," "Clean Pea(se) Straw/Strae."

                       

PEACE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Lord Balanden. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1989; No. 203.

                       

PEACE OF THE VALLEY, THE (Suaimneas Na Gleanna). Irish, Air (4/4 time). C Major. Standard tuning. AB. A composition by Balfe. O’Neill was criticized by some in the traditional circle for his inclusion of several of Balfe’s compositions in his Music of Ireland, on the grounds that “Balfe’s music...was not Irish at all, even if he was.” O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 497, pg. 87.

X:1

T:Peace of the Valley, The

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Moderate”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 497

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

zG|G2 A>G GEGc|e6 e2|e2 d>c B2 d>G|c4 z2||G>A|B2 c>B B2 {d}c>B|

e2 g2 (3g^fe (3edc|c B2 Gc B2A|G4 z2 zG|G2 A>G GEGc|e2 dc f2 ga|

G2 c>d c B2 G|(g4 g)f/e/ d/c/B/A/|_A2 G2 e{f/e/}dfe|c4 z2||

                       

PEACE RIVER BREAKDOWN, THE. Canadian, Breakdown. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Ernest Couvrette. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 16, pg. 17. Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Bob McQuillen & Old New England – “Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire” (1999).

           

PEACEFUL CORCOMORE.  Irish, Slow Air. Composed by concertina player Chris Droney (Bell Harbour, County Clare), named for the ruins of an abbey not far from his home town. Droney is the veteran of several influential céilí bands, including the Aughrim Slopes, Kilfenora, and, latterly, the Four Courts. Cló Iar-Chonnachta CICD 161, Chris Droney – “Down from Bell Harbour” (2005).

 

PEACEMAKER('S HORNPIPE), THE {An Siocantaide/Siotadoir}. AKA and see "Ryth Wyth." English, Irish; Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Kennedy, Vol. 1, 1951; No. 2, pg. 1. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 189. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1666, pg. 310. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 880, pg. 152. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes) 1984; pg. 159.

X:1

T:Peacemaker, The

M:C|

L:1/8
R:Hornpipe

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 880

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

A2|GBdB cBAG|cBcd c2 BA|GBdB cBAG|d2DD D2D2|

GBdB cBAG|cBcd efge|dedc BGAF|G2G2G2:|

|:d2|gfga gfed|cBcd c2c2|agab agfe|f2 dd d2 ef|

gfga gfed|cBcd efge|dedc BGAF|G2G2G2:|

                       

PEACH BLOSSOM HORNPIPE. American, Hornpipe. F Major. Standard tuning. AABB. "Can be used as a Clog,” notes Ryan. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 99. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 135. Green Linnet SIF 3067, Jack and Charlie Coen – “The Branch Line” (1992. Reissue of Topic 12TS337). Topic 12TS337, Jack and Charlie Coen – “The Branch Line” (1977). 

X:1

T:Peach Blossom Hornpipe

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

(cB) | A>cf>a (3gab (eg) | (3fga (fc) A>cA>F | E>FG>A B>cd>B | c>AG>F E>G(cB) |

A>cf>a (3gab (eg) | (3fga (fc) A<cA>F | B>dc>B A>GF>E | F2A2F2 :: (AB) |

B>AG>F E>Gc>B | A>cf>c a>cf>c | B>AG>F E>Gc>B | A>cB>d c2 (BA) |

d>Bb>a g>fe>d | c>Ad>c B>AG>F | E>dc>B A>GF>E | F2A2F2 :|

                       

PEACH BLOSSOMS, THE. Irish, Barndance (cut time). D Major. Standard. AABBCC. The tune was recorded in New York in 1935 by the famous fiddler James Morrison (1893-1947), known as “The Professor” because of his concentration on teaching, although he also recorded many times in the years between 1921 and 1936. Morrison was born in Lackagh, Drumfin, County Sligo. Source for notated version: Paddy Ryan [Treoir]. Treoir, Vol. 32, No. 1, 2000; pg. 22. Green Linnet SIF 1150, “The Moving Cloud.”

X:1

T:Peach Blossoms, The

L:1/8

M:C|

R:Barndance

S:Treoir

K:D

A2|Adfd Adfd|B2 g2 g2 ed|ceae cea^g|b2a2a2 AG|

Adfd Adfd|B2 =g2 g2 ed|ceba ^ga=ge|d2 d2 d2:|

|:A2|(3AAA A2 Bcde|fdAF A2A2|cBGE c2c2|bafd A2A2|

(3AAA A2 Bcde|fdAF A2A2|dcBc dgfe|d2 d2 d2:|

|:^dc|BDGB dgbg|a2 e2 e2 ag|(3fgf c2 c2 fe|d2 B2 B2 dc|

BDGB dgbg|a2 e2 e2 ag|fdcA dcAF|G2 G2 G2:|

                       

PEACH TREE LIMB. AKA and see "Flop-Eared Mule [1]."

                       

PEACHES AND CREAM. AKA - "Peaches and Honey." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, Texas. D Major. Standard. AABB. Similar to "Levantine's Barrel" and "Bummer's Reel [1]". Source for notated version: Benny Thomasson & Pete Martin (Texas) [Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 54 (taken from an old 78 RPM). Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes. Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 182.

 

PEACHES AND HONEY. AKA and see "Peaches and Cream."

 

PEACOCK [1], THE. AKA and see "Sweet Coothill Town."

 


PEACOCK [2], THE. See “The Peacock’s Feather [1].” Irish, March.

 

PEACOCK [3], THE. English, March (cut time). G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Aird (Selections), vol. 2, c. 1786; Pg. 6, No. 17.

X:1

T:Peacock, The [3]

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Aird, Selections of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, vol. II  (1786).

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

fe | d2B2B2 AB | d2d2e2 de | f2f2 fgfe | d2B2B2 :|

|: fg | a2a2 a2 gf | b2a2 a2 gf | g2f2e2d2 | a2 A2A2 fe |

d2B2B2 AB | d2d2e2 de | f2f2 fgfe | d2B2 B2 :|

X:2

T:Peacock, The [3]

M:C

L:1/8

S:John Rook manuscript (Wigton, Cumbria, 1840)

K:G

f>e|d2B2B2 AB|d2d2 e2 de|f2f2 fgfe|d2B2B2:|

|:fg|a2a2 a2 gf|b2a2a2 gf|g2f2e2d2|a2A2A2 fe|

d2B2B2AB|d2d2e2 de|f2f2 fgfe|d2B2B2:|

 

PEACOCK FOLLOWED/FOLLOWS THE HEN, THE. AKA and see “Brose and Butter,” "Cuddle Me, Cuddy," "Brose and Butter," "Mad Moll [1],” “Up and Down Again,” "The Virgin Queen," "Yellow Stockings." English; Jig (9/8 time), Old Hornpipe, and Air. England, Northumberland. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB (Bruce & Stokoe): AABBCCDDEEFFGG (Peacock). "This tune has been claimed as Scottish, and has appeared in the collections of that country under the title of 'Brose and Butter', but in reality it is one of the old English bagpipe hornpipes of the kind so plentiful in the 17th century and in the former part of the 18th. The earliest copy of the tune we have been able to discover is in Playford's Dancing Master, part II, of the edition of 1698, where it appears under the name of 'Mad Moll'; it is nearly identical with our pipe tune as above noted. A slightly different version of the tune was also known by the names of 'Yellow Stockings' and 'The Virgin Queen'‑‑the latter title seeming to identify it with Queen Elizabeth, as the name of Mad Moll does with her sister Queen Mary, who was said to be subject to fits of mental aberration. The words of 'The Virgin Queen' or of 'Mad Moll' are not known to exist, but they probably consisted of some fulsome panegyric on Queen Elizabeth at the expense of her (un)fortunate sister. Allen Ramsey, in his Tea Table Miscellany, published in 1740, printed Dean Swift's song of 'Oh! My Kitten, My Kitten!' to the second version of this tune, and called it 'Yellow Stockings.' This, so far as we have been able to trace, is the first appearance of the air in a Scottish publication. Upwards of half a century later it attained great popularity in that country under the name of 'Brose and Butter', as before mentioned" (Stokoe). It appears in Northumberland musician William Vickers’ 1770-72 music manuscript under the title “Cuddle Me, Cuddy.” The following lyrics, fairly suggestive, appear in Joseph Cawhall’s A Beuk o’ Newcassel Sangs (1888):

***

A’ the neet ower an’ ower,         neet = night

An’ a’ the neet ower agyen—

A’ the neet ower an’ ower,

The peacock followed the hen.

A Hen’s a hungerie dish,

A geusse is hollow within;             geusse = goose

There’s nee deceit iv a puddin’;    ‘no deceit in a pudding’

A pye’s a dainty thing.

***

Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pgs. 152‑153. Peacock (Peacock’s Tunes), 1980; No. 46, pg. 21. Front Hall FHR‑08, Alistair Anderson ‑ "Traditional Tunes" (1976).

X:1

T:Peacock Followed the Hen

T:Cuddle Me, Cuddy

M:9/8

L:1/8

S: Bruce & Stokoe – Northumbrian Minstrelsy  (1882)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Ador

c>de cAA cAA|c>de cAA B2G|c>de cAA cAA|B>cd dgd B2G:|

c>de gee gee|c>de gee f2d|c>de gee gee|B>cd dgd B2G:|

           

PEACOCK JIGG. English, Jig. E Major. Standard tuning. AABBCC. The melody appears in Walsh’s third collection of Lancashire tunes (Lancashire Jiggs, Hornpipes, Joaks, etc.) published around the year 1730.

X:1

T:Peacock Jigg

B:Walsh

M:6/4

L:1/8

K:E

E6 G4 A2| B2 G2 E2 e4 B2| cd e2 c2 B2 AGFE| F6 B,6| E6 G4 A2|\

B2 G2 E2 e4 d2| cd e2 c2 f2 d2 B2| e6 E6::\

g6 e2 dc B2| e6 e4 B2| cd e2 c2 B2 AGFE| F6 B,4 fg |a6 e6| fg agfe d4 B2|\

cd e2 c2 f2 d2 B2 e6 E6:|

                       


PEACOCK RAG. AKA and see "Starlight Clog," "Nightingale (Clog) [2]," "The Mason‑Dixon Schottische," "Parkersburg Landing," "Limber Neck Blues." Old‑Time, Bluegrass; Country Blues or Rag. D Major. Standard tuning. One part (Lowinger): AABB (Brody, Christeson, Phillips): AA’BB’ (Beisswenger & McCann, Silberberg). Popularized by, and often ascribed to, Arthur Smith (Tenn.) {1929‑30}. According to a story told by Jim Nelson (Fiddle-L 4.1.10) a cousin of Smith’s, a fiddler by the name of Clay Smith (Fairview Heights, Ill., although originally from middle Tennessee), learned the tune from the playing of Wade Ray, a popular radio fiddler on KMOX in St. Louis in the 1930s and 40s. Clay told Nelson that he played the tune for Arthur Smith at a family get-together back in Tennessee, and that soon after that Smith recorded it for Bluebird Records. Originally “Peacock Rag” may have been a turn of the century ragtime composition which made its way into the old‑time repertoire (Dr. Charles Wolfe/B. Poss). East Kentucky fiddler Ed Hayley knew the tune as "Parkersburg Landing," while Mississippi musicians Narmour and Smith recorded it as "Limber Neck Blues." Sources for notated versions: Chubby Wise [Brody]: Gus Vandergriff (Pulaski County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Glenn Rickman (1901-1982, Hurley, Missouri) [Beisswenger & McCann]. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozark Fiddle Music), 2008; pg. 112. Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 215. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, vol. 1), 1973; pg. 152. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 24. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 97. Silberberg (93 Tunes I Didn’t Learn at the Tractor Tavern), 2004; pg. 34. American Heritage 1, Herman Johnson‑ "Champion Fiddling." County 547, Arthur Smith‑ "Fiddlin' Arthur Smith and His Dixie‑Liners, vol. 2" (1978). Gusto 104, Chubby Wise‑ "30 Fiddler's Greatest Hits."

See also listing at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:Peacock Rag

% Nottingham Music Database

S:Folk Camps, via EF

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:G

F/2G/2|"D"Af-f/2e/2d|"D"A2 ^GA|"G"Bg -g/2f/2e|"E7"B2 ed|"A7"ca -a/2e/2g/2e/2|

"A7"fe Bc|"D"d/2c/2d/2f/2 -"G"f/2d/2B|"A7"AF G^G|"D"Af -f/2e/2d|"D"A2 ^GA|

"G"Bg -g/2f/2e|"E7"B2 ed|"A7"ca -a/2e/2g/2e/2|"A7"fe Bc|\

"D"d/2c/2d/2f/2 -"A7"f/2c/2e|"D"d2 a^a|"B7"bb/2^a/2 b/2a/2b|"B7"a2 gf|"E7"ee/2f/2 ^g/2b/2g/2f/2|"E7"e3d|\

"A7"ca -a/2e/2g/2e/2|"A7"fe Bc|"D"d/2c/2d/2f/2 -"G"f/2d/2B|"A"A2 a^a|"B7"bb/2^a/2 b/2a/2b|"B7"a2 gf\

"E7"ee/2f/2 ^g/2b/2g/2f/2|"E7"e3d|"A7"ca -a/2e/2g/2e/2|"A7"fe Bc|\

"D"d/2c/2d/2f/2 -"A7"f/2c/2e|"D"d3||

 

PEACOCK'S FANCY [1]. AKA and see "Footy," “Footy Agyen the Wa’.” English, Jig. England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. "Although not originally written for the small pipes, this tune owes its celebrity with pipers to the circumstances that it was a great favourite with John Peacock and the later players. The song of 'Footy', which is sung to it, was better adapted to the tastes of a ruder age than to those of the present time" (Bruce & Stokoe). John Peacock was a legendary Northumbrian piper, credited with extending the range of the instrument through the innovation of adding keys to the plain chanter. Although renowned in his time, Peacock fell on hard times toward the end of his life, and had to rely on the generosity of others in the piping community. "…Peacock (was a) celebrated Northumbrian piper, who came to Newcastle originally from Morpeth, and was perhaps the best small‑pipes player who lived, although not a scientific performer. He was one of the Incorporated Company of Town Waits in Newcastle, and in 1805 in conjunction with William Wright, published a small oblong book of Tunes for the Northumbrian Small Pipes, of which only two or three copies are now known to exist" (Bruce & Stokoe). Peacock lived from 1754(or 6) to 1817 and was taught by William Lamshaw at a time when the smallpipes were just beginning to decline in popluarity. The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 175. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 117.

X:1

T:Peacock’s Fancy

L:1/8

M:6/8

S:Bruce & Stokoe – Northumbrian Minstrelsy  (1882)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D|G3 B2G|c2A B2G|c2A Acd|(e3 e2)f|g2e f2d|B2d g2e| DBG A2G|(E3 E2):|

|:f|g2f efg|a2f d2f|g2e faf|(e3 e2)f|g2e f2d|B2d g2e| dBG A2G|(E3 E2):|

 

PEACOCK’S FANCY [2]. Scottish, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (Cape Breton), who had the tune from Koehler’s Violin Repository [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; pg. 2.

           

PEACOCK'S FEATHER [1], THE (Cleite na Péacóige). AKA – “The Peacock.” Irish, Hornpipe. D Dorian: E Minor (O’Farrell). Standard tuning. AABB. The tune was printed in O’Farrell’s Pocket Companion (IV, 125, c. 1810) as a march under the title “The Peacock.” The tune was recorded by the Tulla Ceili Band. Source for notated version: fiddler Frankie Gavin (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 287, pg. 154. Breathnach (CRÉ III), 1985; No. 218, pg. 100. O’Farrell (Pocket Companion, vol. IV), c. 1810; pg. 125 (appears as “The Peacock”). Shanachie Records 29008, Frankie Gavin ‑ "Traditional Music of Ireland" (1977). Shanachie Records 34009, Frankie Gavin & Alex Finn.

X:1

T:The Peacock's Feather

C:Trad

R:Reel

M:C

K:Edor

L:1/8

BA | GEFD E2 EF | GFGB A2 GA | Beed edBA |1 G2 B,C D2 BA :|2 G2 F2 E2 Bc |

d3 B e4 | edB^G A2 Bd | d2 Be edBA | G2 B,C D2 BA |

GEFD E2 EF | GFGB A2 GA | Beed edBA | G2 E2 E2 ||

X:2

T: Peacock's Feather [1]

S: De Danann

Q: 325

R: hornpipe

Z:Transcribed by Bill Black

M: 4/4

L: 1/8

K: Ddor

AG | F2 E2 D2 DE | FGFA G2 FG | Adde dcAG | FDA,B, C2 AG |

F2 E2 D2 DE | FGFA G2 FG | Adde dcAG | FDEC D2 :|

AB | c2 cA d2 dA | dca^f G2 FG | adde dcAG | FDA,B, C2 AG |

F2 E2 D2 DE | FGFA G2 FG | Adde dcAG | FDEC D2 :|

X:3

T:Peacock, The

M:C|

L:1/8

R:March

S:O’Farrell – Pocket Companion, vol. IV (1810) 

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

B>A | G2E2E2 DE | G2G2A2 GA | B3c dcBA | G2E2D2 BA | G2E2E2 D>E |

G2G2A2 GA | B2e2 dcBA | G2E2E2 :: d3e dcBA | B2e2e2 fg | d3e dcBA |

G2E2D2 BA | G2E2E2 D>E | G2G2A2 GA | B2e2 dcBA | G2E2E2 :|

 

PEACOCK'S FEATHER [2], THE (Cleite na Péacóige). Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard tuning. AA'BB (Breathnach): AA’BB’ (Black, Harker/Rafferty). Black identifies this as an East Galway tune,, recorded by the band De Danann. However, Caoimhin Mac Aoidh attributes it to Joe Holmes of County Antrim, a singer and fiddler who brought the tune to Galway in the early 1970’s. It seems that Holmes and a young Len Graham would travel to stay with friends, the Keanes of Caherlistrane, and introduced the tune on one of his visits. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Frankie Gavin (Ireland) [Breathnach]; New Jersey flute player Mike Rafferty, born in Ballinakill, Co. Galway, in 1926 [Harker]. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 286, pg. 154. Breathnach (CRÉ III), 1985; No. 219, pg. 100. Harker (300 Tunes from Mike Rafferty), 2005; No. 253, pg. 78. Old Bridge Music OBM 07, Máire Ní Chathasaigh & Chris Newman - "The Living Wood” (where they note it is associated with Joe Holmes). Shanachie Records 29008, Frankie Gavin ‑ "Traditional Music of Ireland" (1977). Shanachie Records 34009, Frankie Gavin & Alex Finn (1977).

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T: Peacock's Feather [2]

S: De Danann

Q: 325

R: hornpipe

Z:Transcribed by Bill Black

M: 4/4

L: 1/8

K: D

DE | FEED A2 AB | defd B2 ef | gefd edBd | AFDF E2 DE |

FEED A2 AB | defd B2 ef | gefd edBd |1 AFDF D2 :|2 Adaf de ||

fg | afge fdec | defd (3BcB ef | gefd edBd | AFDF E2 DE |

FEED A2 AB | defd B2 ef | gefd edBd |1 Adaf de :|2 AFEF D4 ||

 

PEACOCK’S FEATHER [3], THE (Cleite na Péacóige). AKA and see “House in the Glen [1].” Irish, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. “House in the Glen” is a related tune. Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O’Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]. Moylan (Johnny O’Leary), 1994; No. 125, pgs. 72-73. Gael-Linn CEF132, Johnny O’Leary - “An Calmfhear/The Trooper” (1989).

 

PEACOCK FEATHERS [4].  English, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody appears in the music manuscript copybook of fiddler John Burks, dated 1821 (a photocopy in the ed. possession). Unfortunately nothing is know of Burks, although he may have been from the north of England.

X:1

T:Peacock Feathers [4]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:John Burks’ music manuscript, dated 1821

N:The ‘B’ part is only 7 measures long in the ms., with a 4th

N:and 5th measure collapsed into one.

N:A reconstructed ‘B’ part from the 4th measure on might go:

N:…|FGAF D2 dc|Bdcd BcAc|GBdg edcB|Agdc BGAF|G2G2G2:|

K:G

df|g2 (dB) GABA|FGAF DEDC|B,DGB Aced|cBAG FA Df|g2 dB GABG|

FGAF DEDC|B,DGB cdec|BGAF G2G2::dc|Bdcd BcAc|GBdg edcB|

cded cBAG|D2 dc BdBd|GBcg edcB|Agdc BGAF|G2G2G2:|

           

PEACOCK’S MARCH. English, March (4/4 time). England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. John Peacock was a famous Northumbrian piper and composer of tunes at the turn of the 19th century (see note for “Peacock’s Fancy [1]”). Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 180. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 174.

X:1

T:Peacock’s March

M:C

L:1/8

R:March

S:Bruce & Stokoe – Northumbrian Minstrelsy

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

(de/f/)|g2 d>d d2 B>A|B2 G>G G2 AB|cBAG edcB|A>GA>G A2 (de/f/)|

g2 d>d d2 B>A|B2 G>G G2A2|Bd de/c/ B2A2|G2 G>G G2:|

|:d>B|A2 A>A AGAB|cB cd/e/ d2 c2|A/G/A/B/ c/d/e/f/ gdBG|A2 A>A A2dB|

BGBd cAce|de/f/ ge d2c2|Bdec BdcA|G2 G>G G2:|

                       


PEACOCK’S TUNE. English (originally), Scottish, Air (6/8 or 3/4 time). England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. "This march ("Peacock's March") and air were both the composition of John Peacock, the celebrated Northumbrian piper, who came to Newcastle originally from Morpeth, and was perhaps the best small‑pipes player who lived, although not a scientific performer. He was one of the Incorporated Company of Town Waits in Newcastle, and in 1805 in conjunction with William Wright, published a small oblong book of Tunes for the Northumbrian Small Pipes, of which only two or three copies are now known to exist" (Bruce & Stokoe). Peacock lived from 1754(or 6) to 1817 and was taught by William Lamshaw at a time when the smallpipes were just beginning to decline in popluarity. Peacock helped to modernize the instrument, commissioning a set of pipes with four keys from maker John Dunn. Lerwick (Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 58. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 174.

X:1

T:Peacock’s Tune

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Bruce & Stokoe – Northumbrian Minstrelsy

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

B/c/|d>ed d>cB|gfg d2 B/c/|d>ed dcB|AAA A2 B/c/|

d>ed d>cB|gfg d2c|Bcd BcA|GGG G2:|

|:G/A/|BAB cBc|dcd ede|fef gdB|AAA A2 d/c/|

BAB cBc|def g2 f/e/|dec BcA|GGG G2:|

           

PEADER FITZPATRICK’S REEL. AKA and see “The Leitrim Bucks,” “The Leitrim Gregg’s Pipes.” Irish, Reel. Peader Fitzpatrick was a well-known County Leitrim fiddler.

           

PEADER O’RIADA’S JIG. Irish, Double Jig. Composed by Peader O’Riada.

           

PEADER’S NEW CALF. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black, in honor of a West Clare flute player who left a session Black was playing in to return home to attend the birthing, only to return later. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 346, pg. 184.

X:1

T: Peadar's New Calf

C: © B. Black

Q: 350

R: reel

M: 4/4

L: 1/8

K: D

D | FAdc BF (3FEF | GBAF ED (3DED | CEGE FAde | fagf e2 de |

fdBd AF (3FEF | GBAF EDCB, | A,CEG FAdB | AFEF D3 :|

e | fdBd bafe | dB (3BAB dBAB | dfaf bfag | fage d2 de |

fdBd AF (3FEF | GBdB AF (3FEF | afge fdBd | AFEF D3 :|

           

PEADAR’S REEL.  AKA and see “Boil the Breakfast Early.” Irish, Reel. G Major (‘A’ part) & D Mixolydian (‘B’ and ‘C’ parts). Standard tuning. AABC. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 229, pg. 140. Tradition/Everest 2120, Kilfenora Fiddle Ceili Band – “Irish Traditional Fiddle Music.”

 

PEAIDÍ A’ CHLÁIR. AKA and see “Paddy from Clare.”

           

PEAIDÍ SPÓRTÚIL. AKA and see “Sporting Paddy.”

                       

PEAL WEDDING, THE. English. England, Northumberland. A modern composition by Northumbrian fiddler Willie Taylor, well-known among Northumbrian musicians.

           

PEAR TREE HORNPIPE. Scottish, Hornpipe. F Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune is attributed to Tyneside fiddler and composer James Hill, in Kohler’s Violin Repository (Edinburgh, 1881-1885). The Pear Tree was a pub in Tyneside (see also “The Hawk”, another Tyneside establishment). Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 50.

X:1

T:The Pear Tree

R:hornpipe

C:James Hill

Z:Kohler's Violin Repository

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:F

C2|F(Ac)(B A)(cf)(a|g)beg afcB|AfcA GdBG|EFGE C2C2|

F(Ac)(BA)(cf)(a|g)beg afcB|AfcA GdBE|G2F2F2:|

(fg)|a(^g af) cfAf|dfcf dfcf|a(^gaf) cdef|{a}=g^fga g2(=fg)|

a(^g af) cfAf|dfcf dfcf|(de)fd (ef)ge|f2a2f2:|

           

PEARL OF THE FAIR POLE OF HAIR. Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Flat Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AB. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 624, pg. 157.

X:1

T:Pearl of the fair pole of hair
M:3/4
L:1/8

R:Air

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 624

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

_d2 cB ce | c2 BA ce | B2 AG (3GFE | F2 EE E2 | _d2 cB ce | c2 BA ce |

B2 AG (3GFE | F2 EE E2 || E2 GB ARF | F2 EE E2 | _d2 cB (3cBG |

F2 GB B>c | _d2 cB (3cBG | B>A GF Ee | e2 B>A (3GFE | F2 EE E2 ||

           

PEARL OF THE FLOWING TRESSES, THE (Pearla na Gruaige Scaoilte). AKA ‑ "Pearla Na Gruaige Scaoilte.” Irish, "Rather Slow" Air (3/4 time). G Dorian. Standard tuning. AB. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 284, pg. 49.

X:1

T:Pearl of the flowing tresses, The
M:3/4
L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Rather slow”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 284

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D2 | G2G2 (G>A) | G4 fd | c2A2 A>G | F4 GA | B2B2 A>G | ^F2G2 c>A |

A2G2G2 | G4 || d2 | g2g2g2 | a4 g2 | (gf) (dc) (d=e) | f4 g/f/d/>c/ | B2B2 AG |

^F2G2 (c>A) | A2 G2G2 | G4 ||

           

PEARL OF THE IRISH NATION [1]. Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Dorian. Standard tuning. AB. Roche Collection, 1982, vol. 3; No. 29, pg. 8.

 


PEARL OF THE IRISH NATION [2]. Irish, Air and Song Tune (6/8 time). D Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AB. "There is a song to this air written by Patrick O'Kelly, a wandering peasant poet of the beginning of the last century, who discloses his name in the last verse: a custom found in other songs" (Joyce). The song begins:
***

Though many there be that daily I see,

Of virtuous beautiful creatures,

With red rosy cheeks and ruby lips,

And likewise comely features:

Yet there is none abroad or at home,

In country or town or plantation,

That can be compared to this maiden fair—

The Pearl of th’ Irish Nation.

***

Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 45, pg. 25.

X:1

T:Pearl of the Irish Nation [2]

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs  (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmix

G/E/|DEG A2A|A<dc B2G|EAG EDE|G3 E2D|DEG A2 A|Adc B2G|EAG EDE|D3 D2||

B|cBc d2d|dBA B2G|GBd dBA|B3 d2D|DEG A2A|A<dc B2G|EAG EDE|D3 D2||

           

PEARL OF THE WHITE BREAST [1]. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). C Major. Standard tuning. One part. "Different from the two airs of the same name in Petrie and Bunting" (Joyce). Source for notated version: "Copied from a MS. collection lent Mr. Pigot by James Hardiman, the historian of Galway and editor of Hardiman's Irish Minstrelsy" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 752, pg. 371.

 

PEARL OF THE WHITE BREAST [2] (Pearla na m-Brollac Baine). AKA ‑ "Pearla Na‑M‑Brollac Baine." AKA and see "Snowy‑Breasted Pearl." Irish, Air (4/4 time). F Major. Standard tuning. AB (Stanford/Petrie): AAB (O’Neill). The tune was recorded (as "Pearla an Vroley Vaun") by the Belfast Northern Star of July 15, 1792, as having been played in competition by one of ten Irish harp masters at the last great convocation of ancient Irish harpers, the Belfast Harp Festival, held that week. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 511, pg. 89. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 623, pg. 156.

X:1

T:Pearl of the White Breast [2]

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow with feeling”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 511

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

cd/e/|f>e dc f3d|cAGF G2 AB|c2 AF BA G>F|F6:|

cB|Acdf e3c|fe d>c c3c|defa gfed|c6||

           

PEARL POLKA, THE. English, Polka. G Major. Standard tuning. AABBCC. Trim (Thomas Hardy), 1990; No. 55.

           

PEARL O’SHAUGHNESSY’S BARNDANCES. Irish, Barndances. Two tunes, the first in four parts, though in Donegal it is often played as two separate barndances, according to Maire O’Keeffe. Fiddler Pearl O’Shaughnessy is the mother of Irish musician Paul O’Shaungnessy, and, as a nameless tune picked up from her playing, it became associated with her and gained her name. The tunes were recorded on a 78 RPM in 1946 by Danny O’Donnell, simply called “Irish Barn Dance.” The ‘A’ part of the tune appears Dave Townsend’s Second Collection of English Country Dance Tunes (1983) as the ‘A’ part of “Fred Pigeon’s No. 2.” Spin CD1001, Eoghan O’Sullivan, Gerry Harrington, Paul De Grae - “The Smoky Chimney” (1996. Learned from Tralee fiddler Maire O’Keeffe, who had them from Pearl O’Shaunghnessy, of Donegal and Scottish origins).

X:1

T:Pearl O’Shaughnessy’s Barndances

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:G

Bc|d2 G2 G2 AB|c2 E2 E2 G2|FGAB cBAc|e2 d2 dcBc|

X:2

T:Pearl O’Shaughnessy’s Barndances

S:Danny O'Donnell

Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de

L:1/8

M:C|

K:D

df|a2a2 a^gba|f2f2 fedf|a2g2 e2c2|b2a2 fedf|\

a2a2 a^gba|f2f2 fedf|a2g2 e2ce|d2d2 d2::ag|\

f<ad2 dfaf|g<be2 e2gf|edcB Acfe|dAce b2ag|\

f<ad2 dfaf|g<be2 e2gf|(3ege cB Acfe|d2d2 d2:|

Bc|dBed B2g2|fege c3d|f2ed f2ed|B2A2 B2Bc|\

dBed B2g2|fege c3d|f2ed ^cdef|g2b2 g2:|

|:dg|b2b2 bd'c'b|a2e2 e2ag|f2ed f2ed|B2A2 B2Bg|\

b2b2 bd'c'b|a2e2 e2ag|f2ed ^cdef|g2b2 g2:|

           

PEARL QUADRILLE. American, Quadrille. The tune was recorded for Edison in 1924 by Ohio fiddler John Baltzell, but was unissued.

           

PEARL WEDDING. English, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by the highly respected Borders fiddler Willy Taylor (d. 2000). Callaghan (Hardcore English), 2007; pg. 45.

                       

PÉARLA AN ACHAIDH MHÓIR. AKA and see "Pride of Ahamore."

           

PÉARLA AN BHROLLAIGH BHAIN. AKA and see "The Pearl of the White Breast," "Snowy-Breasted Pearl." Irish.

           

PÉARLA NA gCLUAINTE. AKA and see "The Pride of Cloontia."

           

PEARLY DEW. Old‑Time. USA, Ky. Recorded Anthology of American Music, 1978, Pete Steele (Ky.) ‑ "Traditional Southern Instrumental Styles."

           

PEARSON’S CLOG. Candian, Clog. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. Source for notated version: fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 17, pg. 30.

           


PEAS AND BEANS. Scottish. There is an anecdote, given first by John Glen (1895) {and repeated by Alburger in 1983}, which relates a story of the famous Scots fiddler Niel Gow, who had stopped into the Princes Street (Edinburgh) music shop of one Penson and Robertson in 1793. He had been looking for a bow and tried several, but nothing suited him. "Then he noticed a copy of "Peas and Beans," which he had just published, on the counter. The shopkeeper saw him pick it up and said, 'If you play that over without a pause or mistake, I will make you a present of the bow'. Niel played, and the man was astonished at his skill, saying, 'You must have seen that piece before!' 'To be shoore,' said Niel, 'I saw it fifty times when I was making it,'" and bow in hand he walked briskly out of the store. Unfortunately the story is not true. The composition was not Niel's but his son Nathaniel's and was not published in the former's lifetime, and there was no music‑seller in Princes Street in 1793; aside, as Alburger says, the possibility that an Edinburgh music‑seller would not recognize the famous Niel Gow.

                       

PEAS AND CORNBREAD. AKA and see "Rocky Pallet."

                       

PEAS IN A POD [1]. Irish, Reel. Composed by County Tipperary fiddler Seán Ryan (d. 1985). Ryan (Seán Ryan’s Dream), 23.

 

PEAS IN THE POD [2]. AKA and see "Peas in the Pot," "Piece in the Pot."

                       

PEAS IN THE POT. AKA and see "Piece in the Pot," "Peas in the Pod." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. G Major. Standard tuning. AA'B. Source for notated version: Clyde Davenport (Ky.) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 182.

           

PEAS ON THE HEARTH (Pis ar an Iarta). AKA and see "Dance Light for My Heart Lies Under Your Feet," "The Humours of Parteen/Purteen/Panteen," "Whip the Cat from Under the Table," "Foxy Mary," "Huish the Cat," "Bimid ag Ol [1]," "Gilibeart Mhac Fhlannchadha," "Pis ar an Iarta," "Bemthe goal."  See note for “Jackson’s Humours of Panteen.”

           

PEAS UPON A TRENCHER. See "Pease Upon a Trencher."

           

PEASANT'S DANCE [1]. American, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The title is in quotes in Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, usually denoting that it came from a stage play, opera, ballet or similar work. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 107. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 145.

X:1

T:Peasant’s Dance [1]
M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

(3e/f/g/ | a/e/c/e/ G/A/c/e/ | f/d/B/A/ G/A/E/A/ | C/E/D/F/ B/c/d/B/ | c/e/c/A/ .B(3e/f/g/ |

a/e/c/e/ E/A/c/e/ | f/d/B/A/ G/A/E/A/ | c/e/c/A/ B/d/B/G/ | AAA :: (3A/c/d/ |

e/c/A f/d/B | A/G/A/c/ B/A/G/F/ | E/C/D/F/ E/G/F/A/ | d/f/c/e/ .B(3A/c/d/ |

e/d/c f/d/B | a/g/a/f/ e/c/c/e/ | d/f/e/d/ c/B/A/G/ | AAA :||

 

PEASANT’S DANCE [2].  English, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody was first printed by David Rutherford in his Choice Collection of Sixty of the Most Celebrated Country Dances (London, 1750), also included in his later Complete Collection of 200 Country Dances, vol. 2 (London, 1760). It was penned into the music manuscript copybooks of London fiddler Thomas Hammersley (1790), and, in America, in the 1790 copybook of fiddler Linnaeus Bolling (Buckingham County, Virginia) and the 1794 copybook of flute player Micah Hawkins (New York). It can even be heard played by the mechanism of a musical clock by Norwich, Conn., master Thomas Harland, dating from the 1770’s. Thompson (Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 1), 1757; No. 174.

X:1

T:Peasant’s Dance [2]

M:6/8

L:1/8

B:Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 1 (London, 1757)

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

B2c ded|c2B ABc|dBG E2A|FDF G3::B2G c2A|B2G A2g|dBG E2A|FDF G3:|
|:g2d gdB|g2B a2B|Bcd E2A|FDF G3::BdB (c2e)|(A2c) (B2d)|G2B AcA|FDF G3:||

           

PEASCOD TIME. AKA and see "The Hunt is Up (When the Cock He Crows)." English, Ballad Air. By the end of the sixteenth century the air "The Hunt is Up" was known by this title, which means the time when the field‑peas are gathered. Under this "Peascod" title the tune was appropriated by two other famous ballads, "The Lady's Fall" and "Chevy Chase."

           

PEASE BRIDGE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Abraham Macintosh, appearing in his Thirty New Strathspey Reels Etc. (Edinburgh, c. 1792). At the time the bridge (located in north Berwickshire not far from Pease Bay) was complete, in 1786, it was the highest in the world—some 140 above the water below. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Music), vol. 1, 1891; pg. 45. S. Johnson (A Twenty Year Anniversary Collection), 2003; pg. 15. Maggie’s Music MM203, Ceoltoiri – “Celtic Lace” (1992).

X:1

T:Pease Bridge

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Glen Collection, vol. 1  (1891)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

f/e/|d>AF>A d>ef>d|c<e A>c G<cD<^c|d>AF>A d>ef>d|ef/g/ gf/e/ fdd:|

f/g/|a>fd>a f<d a>f|g<e d>g e<c g>e|a>fd<a f<d a>f|ef/g/ gf/e/ fddf/g/|

a>fd>a f<d a>f|g>ec>g ecef/g/|(3afa (3geg (3fdf (3e^ce|d<B A>G FDD||

                       


PEASE STRAE/STRAW. AKA and see "Bathget Boys," "Clean Pea(se) Straw/Strae," "Pea Straw" (U.S.).  Scottish, English, American; Reel or Country Dance Tune. England, Northumberland. D Mixolydian or D Major (Johnson). Standard tuning. AB (Surenne): AAB (Athole, Johnson, Skye): AABB' (Barnes, Seattle/Vickers). A popular dance tune in the British Isles and America throughout the 18th century and into the 19th. Instructions for a country dance to the melody can be found in the Scottish Holmain Manuscript, c. 1710‑50, where it is alternately titled "Bathget Boys," and the tune itself is contained twice in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768). Johnson (1988) also prints a contra dance of the same name with the melody. Flett and Flett (1964) record that the same Scottish dance went by different names according to which tune was played to accompany it in a particular locale; thus the dance also was called "Duke of Perth" and "Brown's Reel" in East Fife, Perthshire and Angus, and "Keep the Country, Bonny Lassie" in the upper parts of Ettrick. The title Pease Strae for the series of steps was used in the area around Lanarkshire, Ayrshire, Arran and Galloway, and was taught by all the local dancing masters. An English version was printed c. 1740 in the imprint MWA, 200 Country Dances (pg. 79), and the title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. The melody was recorded as one of the tunes danced to at a 1752 "turtle frolic" at Goats Island, near Newport Rhode Island (a turtle frolic was a special event which occurred when a West Indies turtles, towed astern from the Caribbean, arrived in port). Later, the piece appeared in print in America in A Collection of Contra Dances, printed in Walpole, New Hampshire, in 1799.

***

Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; pg. 75. Charlton Memorial Tune Book, 1956; pg. 21. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 36. Johnson (Twenty‑Eight Country Dances as Done at the New Boston Fair), Vol. 8, 1988; pg. 7. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; pg. 10 (appears as "Clean Pea Strae"). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 72. Mooney, pg. 25. Morrison (Twenty-Four Early American Country Dances, Cotillions & Reels, for the Year 1976), 1976; pg. 35. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 203. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 86. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852; pg. 117. North Star NS0038, "The Village Green: Dance Music of Old Sturbridge Village."

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:Pease Strae

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A|defd gefd|eA A/A/A c2 c>e|defd gefd|egfe d2d:|

f|afdf afdf|eA A/A/A c2 c>f|afdf afdf|egfe d2 d>f|

afdf afdf|eA A/A/A c2 c>f|afge fdec|Agfe d2d||

                       

PEAS(E) UPON A TRENCHER [1] (Pis Air An Mias). AKA and see "The Time I've Lost in Wooing." English, Scottish; Country Dance Tune (2/4 time); Irish, Air. F Major (Raven): G Major (Merryweather & Seattle, O'Neill). Standard tuning. AB (O'Neill): AABB (Merryweather & Seattle, Raven). A trencher is an oblong trough‑shaped shallow dish formerly used instead of a plate. The melody appears in a number of musicians’ manuscript copybooks, including those of Henry Beck (1786), John Fife (compiled 1780-1804 in Perthshire, Scotland, and possibly at sea), Oliver White (Conn., 1775), fifer Aaron Thompson (New Jersey, 1777-1782), and Ebenezer Bevens (Middletown, Conn., 1825), among others. In print it can be found in James Aird’s Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, vol. 1 (Glasgow, 1782), Neil Stewart’s Select Collection of Scots, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, Jiggs, and Marches (Edinburgh, 1788), and in numerous fife tutors and martial publications of the early 19th century. It was a melody in John O’Keefe’s opera The Poor Soldier (1784), and can even be heard played by a musical clock of 1798-99, from the shop of famous New Jersey clockmakers Leslie and Williams. Source for notated version: an MS collection by fiddler Lawrence Leadley, 1827-1897 (Helperby, Yorkshrire) [Merryweather & Seattle]. Merryweather & Seattle (The Fiddler of Helperby), 1994; No. 125, pg. 65. O'Neill (Music of Ireland, 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 533, pg. 93. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 150. Riley (Flute Melodies), vol. 1, 1814; pg. 92.

X:1

T:Pease Upon a Trencher [1]

M:2/4

L:1/8

K:F

C|F>EFG|A2 AA|G>FGA|B2 AG|F>EFG|A>Bcf|cAB>G|F2F:|

|:f|f>FFG|A2 AA|B>GGA|B2 AG|F>EFG|A>Bcf|cAB>G|F2F:|

 

PEAS UPON A TRENCHER [2].  English, American. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody saw martial use as the signal for breakfast and supper, sounded by fifers. It was used for this purpose as early as 1816 when it’s use was identified in a volume called The Martial Music of Camp Dupont, published in Philadelphia. This version of the melody appears in Alvan Robinson’s Massachusetts Collection of Martial Musick, first published in Maine in 1818 (with later editions in 1820 and 1824). Johnson (A Further Collection of Dances, Marches, Minuetts and Duetts of the Latter 18th Century), 1998; pg. 15. Mattson & Walz (Old Fort Snelling…Fife), 1974; pg. 98.

X:1

T:Peas Upon a Trencher [2]

M:2/4

L:1/8

K:G

GA GA|B2B2|AGAB|c2 BA|GABc|dedc|Bcdc|G2G2:|

|:gd GA|G2G2|ae AB|A2A2|GABc|dedc|Bcdc|G2G2:||

X:2

T:Peas Upon a Trencher [2]

M:C

L:1/8

S:Aaron Thompson manuscript (1777-1782, pg. 32)

K:G

GDGA B2B2|AGAB c2c2|GABc dedB|BGdB G2G2:|
|:gdde/f/ gddc|BGAB c2c2|gdde/f/ gddc|BGdB G2G2:||

           

PEAT FIRE FLAME, THE. Scottish, Scotch Measure or March (4/4 time). Scotland, Hebrides Islands. E Minor. Standard tuning. AABB.

           

PEATA AN MAOIR. Irish, Polka. Ireland, West Kerry. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stoir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne {The Set Dance Music of West Kerry}), No. 49, pg. 32.

           

PEATA AN TIGE. AKA and see "The Pet of the House."

           

PEATA BEAG IS A MHÁTHAIR. See "Is Trua gan Peata 'n Mhaoir agam [1]."

           

PEATA BEAG MO MHÁTHAR. See "Is Trua gan Peata 'n Mhaoir agam."

           


PEATA GEAL DO MHÁTHAR/MATAR. AKA and see "Your Mother's Fair Pet," "Is Trua gan Peata 'n Mhaoir agam."

           

PEATA MAMAÍ [1] (Mamma's Pet). AKA and see "Mama's Pet [1]," "Timothy Downing," "Downing's Reel," "The First House in Connaught." Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AB. Breathnach (1963) states Hardeback (1921, No. 3) has a “faulty version” which he calls “The First House in Connaught.” Source for notated version: piper Seán Potts (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 106, pg. 45.

 

PEATA MHAMAÍ [2] (Mamma’s Pet). AKA and see “Lilies of the Field.” Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Source for notated version: Bernard Bogue (Counties Monaghan and Tyrone) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 105, pg. 55.

 

PEATA MHAMAÍ [3] (Mama’s Pet). Irish, Reel. D Major/Mixolydian (‘A’ part) & D Major (‘B’ part). Standard tuning. AA’BB. Source for notated version: fiddler Paddy Nugent (Pomeroy, County Tyrone), from the mid-20th century collection of Liam Donnolly (County Tyrone & Belfast) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 189, pg. 88.

           

PEATA SA CHISTINEACH, AN. AKA and see "The Pet in the Kitchen."

           

PEATAD SEANATAIR. AKA and see "Grandfather's Pet."

           

PÊCHEUSE, LA. French-Canadian, Reel. Canada, Québec. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BC. A ‘crooked’ tune, with extra beats in the third and sixth measures of the ‘C’ part. The first tune Chicoutimi fiddler Louis Boudreault learned on the fiddle, who said “When my mother heard me her eyes filled with tears, knowing full well I would become a fiddler” (Guy Bouchard). Recorded by André Marchand and Jean-Paul Loyer. Remon & Bouchard (25 Crooked Tunes), Vol. 2, 1997; No. 4.

                       

PECKET’S HORNPIPE. English, (Old) Hornpipe (3/2 time). E Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody appears in Walsh’s third collection of Lancashire tunes (Lancashire Jiggs, Hornpipes, Joaks, etc.) published around the year 1730.

X:1

T:Peckets Hornpipe

B:Walsh

M:3/2

L:1/8

K:E

agfe defd e2 E2| GABG F2 f2 d4| cBAc BAGB e2 E2| AGFE B,2 ^D2 E4::\

GBGE GBGE ^D2 F2| AcAF AcAF G2 B2| fafe egec dfdB| agfe Bedf e4:|

                       

PECKERWOOD. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune is a regional Cumberland Plateau tune. Souce Davenport (b. 1921) learned it from his father when he was a boy. Source for notated version: Clyde Davenport (Monticello, Wayne County, Ky.) [Titon]. Titon (Old Time Kentucky Fiddle Tunes), 2001; No. 122, pg. 149. Berea College Appalachian Center AC002, Clyde Davenport – “Puncheon Camps” (1992).

                       

PECKHOVER WALK HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Fisher's Hornpipe." English, Hornpipe. England, Yorkshire. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune is a variant of the well-known "Fisher's Hornpipe." Source for notated version: an MS collection by fiddler Lawrence Leadley, 1827-1897 (Helperby, Yorkshire) [Merryweather & Seattle]. Merryweather & Seattle (The Fiddler of Helperby), 1994; No. 20, pg. 33.

           

PEDDLAR FROM ERNE. AKA and see "The Merchant From the Erne."

           

PEDDLAR’S PUNCH, THE. Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB. Composed by the late Philadelphia, Pa./County Cavan fiddler Ed Reavy (1898-1988). Reavy (The Collected Compositions of Ed Reavy), No. 5, pg. 5.

X:1

T:The Peddlar's Punch

M:2/2

L:1/8

C:Ed Reavy

S:The Collected Compositions of Ed Reavy

R:Reel

N:Ed likes a title that can be taken in more

N:than one way. In this one you don't know which punch of the peddler

N:is the most lethal. He might pack quite a wallop if you cross him,

N:but take just one good sup of his poteen and you'll be lucky if you

N:don't take total leave of your senses.

Z:Joseph Reavy

K:G

DF|G2 BG DGBF|=F2  [FA]F CFAF|G2 GB DGBc|dgfd (3cBA FA|

G2 BF DGBG | =F2 [FA]F CFAF|GABc (3dcB (3cBA |1 GBAF DGGF:|2

GBAF DGGA||B2 ge fdcB|A=F (3FEF ABcA|G2 ge fd^cd|gfga gfdc|

Bdge fdcB|A=F (3FEF ABcA|GABc defa|gbag fdcA:||

           

PEDEAN DANCE IN TEKILE. AKA - "Pandean Dance in Tekeli." Printed in the Welch MSS. See "A Favourite Pandean Dance."

           


PEDESTAL, THE. Canadian, Clog. C Major ('A' part) & A Minor ('B' part). Standard tuning. AB (Messer): AA'BB' (Begin, Hardings). Source for notated version: fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Begin (Fiddle Music from the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 53, pg. 62. Hardings All Round Collection, 1905; No. 164, pg. 52. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 86. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 162, pg. 110.

           

PEEK-A-BOO WALTZ. American, Canadian; Waltz. USA; Arizona, Arkansas, Missouri, Alabama, Tenn., Virginia, New York. Canada, Prince Edward Island. D Major (most versions): G Major (Howard Marshall). Standard tuning. AB (Silberberg): AABB (Phillips): AA’BB’(Perlman). Some have ascribed Swedish origins for this waltz which became popular in the United States in the early part of the 20th century, though Paul Gifford thinks this is unlikely and suspects it was in fact a 19th‑century American composition. He believes that the similarity of “Peek-a-Boo” to a genuine Scandinavian tune, "Life in the Finnish Woods" (well-known to the Scandinavian population of the mid-west), is the reason for the confusion, but maintains this is a coincidence and that the tunes are not derivative or cognate. The waltz has been attributed to William J. Scanlon (1856-1898), who published it in 1881.  Scanlon was a singer who began his career as a child, and by his early teens was accompanying lectures at temperance meetings to sing hymns and provide a musical interlude between sermons.  He toured the New England temperance circuit for seven years, until, at the age of 20, the bright lights and big city called him.  Forming a team with an Irish comedian by the name of William Cronin, he performed on the early vaudeville stage, until finally he made it to Broadway. Scanlon was performing in the show Mavourneen (which opened Sept. 28, 1891 in New York’s 14th Street Theater) when he began to show signs of mental instability, a condition which worsened through the autumn of that year, even though he continued to perform. His final break came on Christmas Day of that year, and on January 7th, 1892, he was institutionalized for reasons of insanity at the Bloomingdale Asylum in White Plains, New York, where he remained until his death six years later. Seattle fiddler Vivian Williams believes the title “Peek-a-boo Waltz” may have derived from the popular song “Peekaboo, I See You,” written in the mid-19th century.

***

The melody was recorded by Uncle Dave Macon, and by fiddler J.C. Glasscock of Steppvile, Alabama, for Gennett Records in 1927, though the side was not issued. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. The waltz was in the repertoire of Galax, Virginia, old time fiddler Luther Davis. The song appears in Ira Ford’s Traditional Music in America (1940). See also the closely related “Svensk Anna’s Waltz.” Sources for notated versions: Attwood O’Connor (b. 1923, Milltown Cross, South Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; Glenn Berry [Silberberg]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 173. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 294. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 136, pg. 48. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 116. Front Hall FHR‑021, John McCutcheon ‑ "Barefoot Boy with Boots On" (1981. Learned from hammered dulcimer player Paul Van Arsdale, Tonawanda, N.Y., who had it from his grandfather). GRT Records 9230-1031, “The Best of Ward Allen” (1973). Sparton Records, SP210, “Ward Allen Presents Maple Leaf Hoedown, Vol. 2.” Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams – “Fiddling Missouri” (1999. Appears as “Art Galbraith’s Peekaboo Waltz,” learned from Art Galbraith in kitchen sessions in the 1960’s). CD, Alan Jabbour, James Reed, Bertram Levy – “A Henry Reed Reunion” (2002).

X:1

T:Peek-a-Boo Waltz

L:1/8

M:3/4

K:D

FG|A2f2e2|d2c2B2|A2F2B2|A4 FG|A2f2e2|d2c2d2|e3 ^d ef|e4 FG|

A2f2e2|d2c2B2|A2F2B2|A4 A_B|=B2g2f2|e2B2c2|d3 c de|d4 FG|

A4f2|A4 A_B|=B4g2|B4 Bd|c3 d c2|B3 c B2|A3 B AG|F4 FG|A4f2|

A4 A_B|=B4g2|B4 Bd|c2B2A2|g2f2e2|d2A2F2|D4||

           

PEEKING PUP, THE. Irish, Waltz. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB.

X:1

T:Peeking Pup Waltz, The

C:Sharon Shannon

L:1/8

M:3/4

R:Waltz

K:G

GE | D3 G G2 | G3 F G2 | A3 B c2 | d3 d c2 |\

B3 G G2 | B3 G G2 | A3 B c2 | A3 G E2 |\

D3 G G2 | G3 F G2 | A3 B c2 | d3 d c2 |\

B3 G G2 | A3 B A2 | G6 | G4   ::\

de | g3 d d2 | g3 d d2 | c3 B c2 | B3 G G2 |\

g3 d d2 | g3 d d2 | c3 B c2 | A4   GE |\

D3 G G2 | G3 F G2 | A3 B c2 | d3 d c2 |\

B3 G G2 | A3 B A2 | G6      | G4   :|**

           

PEEL THE WILLOW. AKA and see "She Goes [1]," "Off She Goes For Butter and Cheese," "Up She Got and Off She Went." American, Jig. USA, southwestern Pa. E Flat Major. Standard tuning. AB. A version of the very popular English country dance tune "Off She Goes." Source for notated version: Hiram White (fiddler from Greene County, Pa., 1930's; he also called the tune "Blackberry Blossom") [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 544G, pg. 487.

           


PEELER AND THE GOAT, THE (An Siotcoimeadaide Agus An Ga) AKA and see "Bansha Peelers,” “Cabin Buck,” “Cavan Buck" Irish (originally), American; Single Jig, Slide (12/8 time) or Air. USA, southwestern Pa. A Dorian (Bayard, Kennedy, Moylan, O'Neill, Roche): E Dorian (Bayard, Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham). Standard tuning. AABB (Kennedy, Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham, Roche): AB (Bayard, O'Neill). The title comes from a satirical Munster song about the institution of a police force in Ireland by Sir Robert Peel; thus, a 'peeler' became a nineteenth century slang term for a policeman. The earliest Bayard found the tune was from Nov., 1842, in the Dublin Citizen's Magazine (reprinted by Moffat {1897}). O’Neill (1913) records that the song was composed by Darby Ryan (1779-1855), who lived near Lisheen, County Tipperary. Some place Ryan in Bansha, a small village half‑way on the road between Cahir and Tipperary Town. A Donegal song, “An Gabhar Ban," is nearly exactly the same tune, and its words, while not comical, are similarly about an altercation between a goat and authority figures. Sources for notated versions: Scottish fifer Dick Gibson via Hiram Horner (fifer from Westmoreland and Fayette Counties, Pa., 1960) and Mrs. Anastasia Corkery (Pa., 1930's; originally from County Cork) [Bayard]; accordion player Johnny O’Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 443, pgs. 4412‑413 and Appendix No. 40, pg. 589. Henebry, 1928; pg. 224 (2 sets). JIFSS, No. 6, pg. 27. JFSS, vol. 2, pg. 259 (2 sets). Kennedy (Traditional Dance Music of Britain and Ireland: Jigs & Quicksteps, Trips & Humours), 1997; No. 152, pg. 37. Kidson (A Garland of English Folksongs), 1926; pg. 76. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stoir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne {The Set Dance Music of West Kerry}), No. 72, pg. 43 (appears as “Gan Ainm” {untitled}). Moylan (Johnny O’Leary), 1994; No. 306, pg. 176.  O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915/1987; No. 214, pg. 114. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 296, pg. 51. Petrie‑Stanford (Complete Collection), 1903‑06; No. 839. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 2; No. 241, pg. 21.

X:1

T:Peeler and the Goat, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Lively”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 296

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Minor

A/B/|c2A BAG|A2B c2d|efe d2c|B2G GAB|c2A BAG|A2B c2d|e^fg =fed|e2A A2||

^f|g2e dcd|e^f^g a2b|age d2g|B2G GAB|c2A BAG|A2B c2d|e^fg =fed|e2A A2||

           

PEELER CREEK WALTZ. Old‑Time, Waltz. G Major ('A' part) & E Minor ('B' part). Standard tuning. AB (Matthiesen): AABB (Johnson, Phillips). Mandolinist Kenny Hall learned the tune when young (c. 1930's) from a woman in Texas. An alternate title, “Feed Your Babies Onions,” is sometimes employed for the tune derived from Hall’s sung verse. The melody resembles in some parts “Temperance Reel.” Source for notated version: Jim Ringer via Jay Ungar (West Hurley, New York) [Matthiesen]; Ron Kane and Skip Gorman [Phillips]. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), No. 1, 1991; pg. 4. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 43. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 295. Philo 1008, "Kenny Hall" (1978).

           

PEELER’S AWAY WITH MY DAUGHTER, THE. AKA and see “Hills of Glenorchy [1],” “Jackson’s Delight [2],” “Jolly Corkonian.” Irish, Double Jig. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. Peeler = policeman, after Sir Alfred Peel, the prime mover behind the British police force. Bayard assigns this tune to the quite large group he called the “Hillside [2]” family of tunes. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 4; No. 208, pg. 23.

X:1

T:Peeler’s Away with my Daughter, The

L:1/8

M:6/8

S:Kerr (IV, 208)

K:A Dorian

Gf|eAA ABd|ede g2e|dBG GAG|BGB dgf|eAA ABd|ede g2a|g2e dBG|ABA A:|

z|:B|eaa age|aga b2a|gag gdB|gag gab|aba age|aga b2a|g2e dBG|ABA A2:|

           

PEELER'S CAP. AKA and see "Peeler's Jacket" [2], "Flannel Jacket," "Hibernia's Pride."

 

PEELER'S JACKET [1]. AKA and see "The Boys of the Lake [2]," "Collin's Reel [1]," "Corkonian Reel," "Emminence Breakdown," "Ike Forrester's Reel [1]," "Merry Blacksmith," "Paddy on the Railroad," "Peeler's Reel/Policeman's Reel," "The Railroad [2]," "The Shepherd in/on the Gap." Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. 'Peeler' was a slang term for a policeman in Ireland, a reference to Sir Robert Peel who originated the Irish police force in the mid‑19th century. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 22. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 45. White’s Unique Collection, 1896; No. 91, pg. 16.

X:1

T:Peeler’s Jacket [1]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A2 | Adcd BAFA | Adcd BAFA | ABde fded | Bdef gfed | dcdA BAFA |

Adcd BAFA | ABde fdec | dBAF D2 || (fg) | abag fgfe | dcdA BAFA |

ABde fded | Bdef e2 (fg) | abag fgfe | dcdA BAFA | ABcd fdec | dBAF D2 ||

 


PEELER'S JACKET [2] (Casog An Sitmaor/Sitmaoir). AKA and see "Flannel Jacket," "Hibernia's Pride," “New Policeman's [2],” "Peeler's Cap."  Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001, Stanford/Petrie): AABB (Cranitch, Mulvihill): AABB' (O'Neill/Krassen). Petrie (1855) dates the tune "no older" than the 18th century, and notes “Same as ‘Flannel jacket’.” Source for notated version: “A Munster reel. From (the Irish collector) Mr. Joyce” [Stanford/Petrie]; Mr. Michael Kilkelly of Athlone, 1889 [Joyce]; “My mother” [Mulvihill]. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 28 (2nd tune), pg. 32 (7th tune), pg. 43 (2nd tune). Cotter (Traditional Irish Tin Whistle Tutor), 1989; 66. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 83. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 29. Giblin (Collection of Traditional Irish Dance Music), 1928; 10. Harding's Original Collection, 1928; No. 78. Joyce (Ancient Irish Music), 1873; No. 6. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 204, pg. 101 (appears as untitled reel). Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 206, pg. 56. O’Brien (Jerry O’Brien’s Accordion Instructor), 1949. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 93. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1184, pg. 223. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 463, pg. 90. Petrie, 1855; vol. 2, pg. 39. Robbins, 1933; No. 117. Roche Collection, vol. 1, No. 141. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; Nos. 584 and 893, pgs. 147 & 226. Cló Iar-Chonnachta CICD 173, Brian Conway – “Consider the Source” (2008).

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:Peeler’s Jacket [2]

L:1/8

M:C|

K:G

G2 BG DGBG|FGAB c2 Bc|Bggf d2 eg|fdcA BGAF|G2 BG DGBG|

FGAB c2 Bc|dggf d2 eg|fdcA BGGz||gagf d2 ef|gfga bgaf|gagf d2 eg|

fdcA BGGz|gagf d2 ef|gfga bgaf|gbag fdeg|fdcA BGAF||

X:2

T:Untitled/Peeler’s Jacket [2]

R:Reel

N:This is a distanced variant of the usual tune

L:1/8

M:2/4

S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

d/c/|B/G/G/G/ GA/G/|F/D/D/D/ G/A/B/c/|d/g/g/g/ fd/c/|B/d/c/A/ F/D/d/c/|

B/G/G/G/ GA/G/|F/G/A/B/ c/A/B/c/|d/g/g/e/ f/a/a/g/|f/d/c/A/ G||

B/c/|d/g/g/f/ dg/a/|b/g/a/g/ f/d/d|f/a/a/g/ f/d/e|f/d/c/A/ F/D/D|D/G/G/A/ BB/c/|

d/g/g/a/ b/g/a/g/|fd/e/ f/d/c/A/|B/d/c/A/ G||

X:3

T:Peeler’s Jacket, The

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Stanford/Petrie, No. 893  (1905)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

DGBG DGBG|DGBG c2 Bc|dggf d2g2|fdcA BGAF|DGBG DGBG|

DGBG c2Bc|dggf d2g2|fdcA BG G2||g2gf d2(3def|g2 ga bgaf|g2gf d2g2|

fdcA BG G2|g2gf d2(3def|g2 ga bgaf|gfgb afge|fdcA BG G2||

 

PEELER'S JACKET [3]. AKA and see "Oh My Foot," "Where's My Other Foot," "Temperance Reel," "Teetotaler('s Reel)." Irish, American; Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AA'BB'. This tune is better-known as “Temperance Reel.”  Howe (c. 1867) prints directions to a contra-dance set to the tune, and includes it in a section of tunes from Jimmy Norton, the “Boss Jig Player.” Presumably Norton was a band-leader or principal instrumentalist in the Boston, Massachusetts, area in the mid-19th century. Source for notated version: William Shape (Greene County, Pa., 1944) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 286B, pg. 240. Howe (1000 Jigs and Reels), c. 1867; pg. 32. White and Robbins.

X:1

T:Peeler’s Jacket [3]

T:Temperance Reel

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Howe – 1000 Jigs and Reels  (c. 1867)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

(3DEF | (G{A}G/)F/ G/A/B/c/ | (d/B/)g/e/ d/B/A/c/ | (B/E/){F}E/D/ E/F/G/A/ |

(B/G/)(A/F/) G/F/E/D/ | D/(G/{A}G/)F/ G/A/B/c/ | (d/B/)g/e/ d/B/A/c/ |

(B/E/){F}E/D/ E/F/G/A/ | (B/d/).A/.F/ G :: B | (B/e/)e/d/ e>f | (g/e/)a/f/ g/f/e/d/ |

(B/d/)d/e/ d>e | (g/e/)a/f/ g/f/e/d/ | (B/e/)e/d/ e>f | (g/e/)a/f/ g/f/e/d/ |

(B/E/){F}E/D/ E/F/G/A/ | (B/d/).A/.F/ G :|

 

PEELER'S JACKET [4]. AKA and see “The Lonesome Reel,” “Sean Reid’s Reel.”  Irish, Reel. F Major (Danu): G Major (Harker/Rafferty). Standard tuning. AB (Danu): AABB (Harker/Rafferty). Kells Music 9509, Mike and Mary Rafferty – “The Dangerous Reel” (). Shanachie 78030, Danú – “Think Before You Think” (2000).

X:1
T:Peeler's Jacket  [4]
R:reel
D:Danú, "Think Before You Think", 9a
Z:Jeff Lindqvist
M:C|
L:1/8
K:F
FD||C~F3 A~F3|BGEG c2cF|CFFG ~A3c|BGEF GFFE|
CFFG ~A3A|BGEG cBcd|efge ~f2cf|ecBG GFEC|
CFFG ~A2FA|B~G3 c3F|CFFG ~A3c|BGEF GFFE|
CFFG ~A2FA|BGEG cBcd|efge ~f2cf|ecBG GFAB||
cffe ~f2cf|ecdf ecBG|cffe fcdf|ecBG GFAB|
cffe ~f2cf|ecdf ecBG|cffg afgf|ecBG GFAB|
cffe ~f2cf|ec (3def ecBG|cffe ~f2cd|ecBG GFAB|
cffe ~f2cf|ec (3def ecBG|cffg afgf|ecBG GAFE||

 

PEELER’S JACKET [5].  AKA and see “Michael Carney’s Reel,” “Ravelled Hank of Yarn [1].” Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. Columbia 33350-F (78 RPM), Michael Carney & James Morrison.

 

PEELER'S JIG, THE. AKA and see "Oro, a Thaidhg, a Ghra," "Barney's Goat," "Skin the Peeler(s)," "Late Home at Night."

 

PEELER'S POCKET, THE (Póca an Philéara). Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. See also the related “Money Musk.” Source for notated version: fiddler Jim Mulqueeny, 1966 (Kilfenora, Co. Clare, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRÉ II), 1976; No. 204, pg. 105.

 

PEELER'S REEL. AKA and see "The Policeman's Reel," "The Merry Blacksmith," "The Peeler's Jacket [1].”

 

PEELER'S RETURN, THE. AKA and see "The Policeman's Return," "The Humours of Whiskey [2]," "The Bridge of Athlone [1]," "Humours of Derry," "Dillon's Fancy [2]," "The Crossroads Frolic," "Deel of the Dance," "Dever the Dancer," "Barranna mora Chlann Conncha," "Plearaca an Fuisce."

                       

PEELY CUIT BAN. AKA and see "The Long White Cat."

                       

PEEP O' DAY [1]. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by "N. Gow" (Niel or Nathaniel?), according to Ryan/Cole, although John Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing of this tune in Robert Ross's 1780 collection. Nigel Gatherer says he has been unable to find the tune in any of the Gow collections, leading to the conclusion the attribution by Ryan is erroneous. Although perhaps unrelated to the title of this reel, Don Meade finds that the Peep o’ Day Boys referred to Protestant gangs that terrorized the Ulster Catholic population in the late 18th century (who visited homes at dawn in search of arms or to give the message to leave and “go to Hell or Connacht”). Perhaps it is a reference to the most popular title by Mrs. Favell Lee Mortimer (1802-1878), an English writer in the mid 19th century, was The Peep of Day; or, a Series of the Earliest Religious Instruction the Infant Mind is Capable of Receiving, a children’s Bible primer. Published in 1833 when the author was aged 31, it was hugely successful and sold at least a million copies in thirty-eight languages, “including Yoruba, Malayalam, Marathi-Balbodh, Tamil, Cree, Ojibwa, and French” (see Todd Pruzan, “Global Warning,” The New Yorker, April 11, 2005, pg. 34-41). Mrs. Mortimer, however, was a particularly acerbic and opinionated writer, and sometimes downright sadistic. In the opening chapter of Peep of Day she writes (for children, remember!):

***

God has covered your bones with flesh. Your flesh is soft and warm. In your flesh there is blood.

God has put skin outside, and it covers your flesh and blood like a coat…How kind of God it was

to give you a body! I hope that your body will not get hurt.

***

Will your bones break?—Yes, they would, if you were to fall down from a high place, or if a cart

were to go over them…How easy it would be to hurt your poor little body!

***

If it were to fall into the fire, it would be burned up…If a great knife were run through your body,

the blood would come out. If a great box were to fall on your head, your head would be crushed.

If you were to fall out of the window, your nick would be broken. If you were not to eat some food

for a few days, your little body would be very sick, your breath would stop, and you would grow

cold, and your would soon be dead.

***

Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 34. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 60.

X:1

T:Peep o’ Day [1]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A |: (3.d.d.d (dA) BdAF | AFAg fdBc | (3.d.d.d (dA) BdAF | GFEF GABc |

{e}d^cdA BdAF | ABde fdef | {a}gfge fedf | edce dAFA :|

|: abaf afdf | gefd | edBe | afdf abaf | edef d2 (df) |

afdf abaf | gbfa edBe | (3.d.d.d (dA) BdAF | ABde (fd) d2 :|

 

PEEP O' DAY [2]. Scottish. No relation to “Peep o’ Day” [1]. Hamilton’s Universal Tunebook, 1844.

 

PEEP O' DAY [3]. Scottish, Reel or Strathspey. G Major (Aird, Kennedy): D Major (Howe). Standard tuning. AAB. Howe sets the tune as a strathspey, Aird as a reel. Aird (Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs), vol. II, 1783; Nos. 173, pg. 64. Howe (1000 Jigs and Reels), c. 1867; pg. 133. Kennedy (Traditional Dance Music of Britain and Ireland: Reels and Rants), 1997; No. 154, pg. 36.

X:1

T:Peep o’ Day [3]

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Aird, vol. II (1782)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G2 BG dGBG | A/A/A Bd e2g2 | G2 BG dGBG | cABG E2 D2 :|

|| g>age dBGB | gage agab | gage dBGB | cABG “tr”E2D2 |

g>age dBGB | (gage) agab | gbeg dgBG | cABG “tr”E2D2 ||

 

PEEP O' DAY RANGER, THE. Irish, Air (6/8 time). D Dorian. Standard tuning. AB. Source for notated version: Mr. Flattely of Mayo, via Forde (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 488, pgs. 269‑270.

 

PEER OF LEITH, THE. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. ABBC. McGibbon (Scots Tunes, book II), c. 1746; pg. 38.

X:1

T:Peer of Leith, The

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow”

S:McGibbon – Scots Tunes, book II, pg. 38 (c. 1746)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

E | F2A2e3c | (d>c)(BA) “tr”B3A | F2A2e2 ({d}c)B | “tr”A3B (A/B/c)E2 |

F2A2e3f | (e/f/a/f/) (e/f/e/c/) “tr”B3c | (AB/c/) (Bc/d/) (ce)(fe) | (dc)”tr”(BA) (A/B/c)E2 ||

|: F4 F>GE>F | G2(GA) (G/A/B) AG | “tr”(FE)FA (FA)(EF) | A>Bc>B (A/B/c)E2 |
F>EF>A F>AE>F | “tr”(G>FG)A (G/A/B) (A^G) | (AB/c/) (Bc/d/) c(ef)e |

(dc)”tr”(B>A) (A/B/c)E2::F2A2”tr”e3c | (dc)(BA) “tr”B3A | F2A2e2{d}(cB) |
”tr”A3B (A/B/c) E2 | F2A2e3f | (e/f/a/f/) (e/f/e/c/) B3c | (AB/c/) (Bc/d/) (ce)(fe) |

(dc)”tr”(BA) (A/B/c)E2 :: f4 f>ae>f | g2 (ga) (g/a/b) “tr”(a>g) | “tr”(f>ef)a (fa)(ef) |

a>^ga>b a2e2 | (fef)a f2(ec) | e2(ef) g3e | fa”tr”(^gf) ed”tr”(cB) | A3B (A/B/c) E2 :|

 

PEERIE DUNTER, DA (The Little Duck). Shetland, Jig. A Major.Standard tuning. AAB. "Composed (by Tom Anderson) in the summer of 1975 while watching the antics of a baby Eider duck swimming just off the rock where Tom was sitting at Avensgarth, Eshaness. The 'Dunter' is the Shetland name for the Eider duck" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 27.

 


PEERIE HOOSE AHINT/AHUNT THE BURN, DA (The Little House Behind/By the Stream). AKA and see “Fay’s Hornpipe,” "Fey's Hornpipe" (English). Shetland Islands, March or Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The title is Shetland dialect for “The Little House by the Stream,” in other words, the out-house. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 46. BBC Records REB 84M, Tom Anderson's Shetland Fiddle Band ‑ "Scottish Fiddlers to the Fore." CAT-WMR004, Wendy MacIssac - “The ‘Reel’ Thing” (1994). Olympic 6151, The Shetland Fiddlers' Society ‑ "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

 

PEERIE HOOSE UNDER DA HILL, DA (The Little House Under the Hill). Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Nesting (district of Mainland Shetland). G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. A traditional reel, "well known over the most of the country districts of Shetland" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 92.

 

PEERIE WEERIE. See “Perrie Werrie.”

 

PEERLESS HORNPIPE. American, Hornpipe. C Major (Cole, Phillips, Ryan): G Major (Miller). Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: Joey McKenzie [Phillips]. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 112. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 215. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 304, pg. 180. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 149.

X:1

T:Peerless Hornpipe

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

G | c/G/E/G/ C/G/E/G/ | F/G/D/G/ F/G/D/G/ | (E/G/)c/d/ (e/c/)f/e/ | d/c/B/A/ .G(3G/A/B/ |

c/G/E/G/ C/G/E/G/ | F/G/D/G/ F/G/D/G/ | (E/G/)c/d/ (e/d/)c/B/ | c[Ec][Ec] :: (Bc) |

d/B/G/B/ d/B/g/f/ | e/c/G/c/ e/c/a/g/ | ^f/d/A/d/ f/d/b/a/ | g/a/f/g/ e/f/d/e/ |

c/G/E/G/ C/G/E/G/ | F/G/D/G/ F/G/D/G/ | (E/G/)c/d/ (e/d/)c/B/ | c[Ec][Ec] :|

                       

PEEVISH CHILD, THE (An Paisdin Neimneac). AKA and see “The Troubled Child.” Irish, Slow Air (2/4 time). G Minor (O’Neill): G Dorian (Stanford/Petrie). Standard tuning. AB. Attributed to the 18th century Co. Leitrim harper Jerome Duigenan by collector George Petrie. See note for “The Troubled Child.” O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 474, pg. 83. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 590, pg. 149.

X:1

T:Peevish Child, The

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 474

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Gmin

G>A BG/E/|F>G AB/c/|dA cA/G/|F3F|GG/A/ B/G/F/D/|

F>G AB/c/|d>A c/A/F/A/|G3G||d>e dc|d/b/a/^f/ g2|d>c BG|

F>G AB/A/|GG A/G/F/D/|F>G AB/c/|d>A c/A/F/A/|G3 G||

                       

PEG A RAMSAY. Irish, English; Air (4/4 time). C Major (Chappell): D Mixolydian (Kines). Standard tuning. AB (Chappell): ABB (Kines). The tune appears in William Ballet's Lute Book of 1594, and a Scottish version in the Rowallan Manuscript (c. 1629) under the title “Maggie Ramsay.” John Glen (Early Scottish Melodies, 1900) believes Scottish sources predate English ones, and says that the William Ballet tune is merely an English version of the Rowallan one (believing the Ballet book not to have the antiquity claimed for it). Grattan Flood (1906) explains that it was curiously called a "dump tune" by Thomas Nash in 1596 (in his Have with you to Saffron Walden), and again in his 1598 "Shepherd's Holiday" when he alluded to "Roundelays, Irish Hayes, "Cogs and Rongs, and Peg a Ramsay."  Shakespeare, in Twelfth Night (act ii, sc 3) refers to the dance when Sir Toby calls Maluolio a "Peg a Ramsay" and also makes mention of "merry dumps," "dreary dumps," "deploring dumps," and "doleful dumps." Perhaps because of the latter three references Chappell (1859) thought the dump a slow dance (see "The Irish Dumpe"), while Cowyn equates it with the Irish "duan" of "dan" (meaning a song or poem). According to Flood (not always the most accurate of researchers, and sometime notoriously erroneous), it referred to the music of an ancient Irish harplike instrument, the "tiompan" or timpan. The timpan was also popular in England in the 15th and 16th centurys, and the words "dump" and "thump," which mean to "pluck" and "strike" the timpan entered the English language, originally in connection with the instrument. Thus Shakespeare's reference to a "merry dump" is explained as descriptive of a technique of playing or a type of sharp musical attack (See "Dump"). Chappell says that Ramsey was a town in Huntingdonshire which was formerly an important burg, called "Ramsey the rich" before the destruction of its abbey. In later years the title “Peg-a Ramsay,” meaning ‘Peg from Ramsey’ became the name “Peggy Ramsay.”  “Bonny Peggy Ramsay” with bawdy words appears in Wit and Mirth (1719) and exactly fit the tune in Dr. Bull's manuscript boot, states Kines (1964). They begin:

***

Bonny Peggy Ramsay that any man may see;

And bonny was her face with a fair freck I'd eye;

Neat is her body made and she hath good skill,

And round are her bonny arms that work well at the mill

With a hey tro‑lo‑del, hey tro‑lo‑del, hey tro‑lo‑del lil;

Bonny Peggy Ramsay that works well at the mill.

***

A second tune for “Peg a Ramsay” is cited by Chappell, that of “Watton Town’s End,” to which several songs were sung, including that of “Bonny Peggy Ramsay”

***

Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Time), vol. 1, 1859; pg. 248. Kines (Songs From Shakespeare's Plays and Popular Songs of Shakespeare's Time), 1964; pg. 10.

X:1

T:Peg-a Ramsey

M:C

L:1/8

S:Chappell – Popular Music of the Olden Times  (vol. 1, 1859)

N:Chappell printed the version from William Ballet’s Lute Book

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

d2e2f2d2 | e2c2c2e2 | d2B2G2A2 | B4 c4 ||

B2A2B2G2 | A2G2D2D2 | G2G2G2A2 | B4c4 ||

X:2

T:Maggie Ramsay

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Rowallan Manuscirpt (c. 1629)

K:D

Bc dc|dB D2|GE B,E|G2A2::GE B,E|FD DA|GE B,E|G2A2:|

                       

PEG HUGLESTONE’S HORNPIPE. English, Hornpipe. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody appears in Walsh’s third collection of Lancashire tunes (Lancashire Jiggs, Hornpipes, Joaks, etc.) published around the year 1730.

X:1

T:Peg Huglestones Hornpipe

B:Walsh

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:C

GF| E2 A4 GA| c4 dcBA| c2 e2 dcBA| d2 B4 GF| E2 A4 GA| c4 cBcA| c2 e2 dcBA|\

G2 E4:: gf| e2 g2 fedc| d2 g2 edcB| c2 e2 dcBA| d2 B6| e3 f gefg| fefg a4| \

agfe dcBA| G2 E4::

                       

PEG McGRATH’S REEL. AKA and see “Micho Russell’s (Reel) [6],” “Upstairs in a Tent [1].” Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Peg McGrath (1948-1995) was a flute player whom Martin Mulvihill heard playing this tune in a session at a Fleadh Cheoil in Listowel, according to Matt Molloy. Source for notated version: the Bridge Ceili Band [Mulvihill]. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 47, pg. 12. Ossian OSS CD 130, Sliabh Notes – “Along Blackwater’s Banks” (2002).

X:1

T:Peg McGrath's

T:Micho Russell's

R:reel

D:Catherine McEvoy with Felix Dolan (track 5b)

D:Paul McGrattan and Paul O'Shaughnessy: Within a Mile of Dublin

M:C|

L:1/8

K:G

~B3G ~A3G|FDAD BDAF|DGGF G2GE|FDDc ABcA|

BdBG ABAG|FDAD BDAF|DGGF G2GE|FdcA BGGz:|

|:dggf gzag|fdde fdcA|dggf gzfg|a2ga b~g3|

bggf gbag|fdde ~f3g|azag abag|fddc ABcA:||

 

PEG McGRATH’S REEL [2].  AKA and see “Trip to Birmingham.”

                       

PEG RYAN'S. AKA and see “Egan’s Polka [1],” “Kerry Polka [1].” Irish, Polka. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB (Taylor/Tweed): AABBCC (Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham, Miller & Perron). Peg Ryan is a musician from Murroe, east County Limerick. Often played in D Major. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1976, vol. 4, No. 77 (appears as “Egan’s”). Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stoir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne {The Set Dance Music of West Kerry}), No. 50, pg. 32. Miller & Perron (101 Polkas), 1978; No. 17. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 2nd Edition, 2006; pg. 134. Taylor (Traditional Irish Music: Karen Tweed’s Irish Choice), 1994; pg. 35.

X:1

T:Peg Ryan’s

R:Polka

Z:Transcribed by Robert Eckert

M:2/4

L:1/16

K:G

B2D2E2D2|B2D2E2D2|G4A3B|A2G2E2D2|\

B2D2E2D2|B2D2E2D2|G4A3B|A2G2G2A2:|\

B2d2B2 dB|A2G2E2D2|G4A3B|A2G2E2D2|\

B2d2B2 dB|A2G2E2D2|G4A3B|A2G2G4:|

                       

PEG WARREN’S. Irish, Slide (12/8 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: recorded in November, 1970, by Breadan Breathnach from the playing of accordion player Johnny O’Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border); O’Leary learned the tune from Peg Warren of Maulykeavane, a village in the same region [Moylan]. Moylan (Johnny O’Leary), 1994; No. 5, pg. 5.

                       

PEGG IN THE SETTLE. AKA and see "Drowsy Maggie [1]."

                       

PEGGIE IS OVER YE SIE WI’ YE SOULDIER. Scottish. From the Skene Manuscript (c. 1615). Bayard finds a modern American variant of the song and tune in the Lomax’s Our Singing Country (1941) under the title “The Lame Soldier,” recorded in Indiana in 1938. In the song Peggy leaves her husband to follow a soldier overseas, but afterwards is mistreated by him. Bayard says the second line of the Lomax tune is nearly identical with the first and second lines of the Skene MS air, and feels the Indiana song must be a derivative in both tune and words.

X:1

T:Peggie is Over Ye Sie Wi’ Ye Souldier

M:3/8

L:1/8

K:C

cde|edd|geg|a3:|c’ba|bag|a’2 b|a2 b|c’ba|geg|a2 a|A3||

                       

PEGGIE’S DUMPLING. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Carl Volti, born Archibald Milligan in Glasgow in 1849. Volti, a fiddler, composed many tunes found in the Kerr’s collections and also published several tutors, albums of popular songs, national overtures, etc. (Nigel Gatherer). Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 4; No. 8, pg. 4.

X:1

T:Peggie’s Dumpling

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 4, No. 8  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

(ce)ea f2 df | e2ce d2Bd | (ce)ea f2 df | ecAc B2A2:|

|:cBAB ceec |dfec Bcde | cBAB ceec | dfec B2A2:|

                       

PEGGIE'S WEDDING. See "Peggy's Wedding."

                       

PEGGY AROON. AKA and see "Peggy, My Darling."

           

PEGGY BAND.  English, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody originally appears in Charles and Samuel Thompson’s Compleat Collection, vol. 3 (London, 1773). It was entered into the commonplace books of Elisha Belknap (Framingham, Mass., 1780), and fiddlers John and William Pitt Turner (Norwich, Conn., 1788). Numerous tunes from the Thompson’s 1773 collection appear in the Turners’ collection. In the Belknap collection it is called “Peggy Band, a Retreat” indicating military use as a melody played to signal end of duties in the evening. There are different tunes under the title “Peggy Band, a Retreat.” One such is in the manuscripts of Perthshire musician John Fife, 1780, and fifer William Morris  of Hunterdon County, N.J., 1776, which tune is called “Peggy Bawn” in James Aird’s Selections of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, vol. 5, 1797. It is reasonable to assume the “Peggy Band” title is a corruption of “Peggy Bawn.” Thompson (Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3), 1773; No. 138.

X:1

T:Peggy Band

M:6/8

L:1/8

B:Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3 (London, 1773)

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

d|B2c d2g|B2c d2g|gfe dcB|”tr”B3 A2d|B2c d2g|B2c d2g|fed de^c|(d3 d2):|

|:B/c/|d>ed B2d|(d3 c2) A/B/|c>dc ABc|(c3 B2)d|g2G GAG|g2G G2e|dcB BcA|(G3 G2):||

           

PEGGY BAWD. See “Peggy Bawn.”

                       

PEGGY BAWN (Mairgreadin Ban). AKA and see "Peggy Bawd." Irish, Scottish; Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major (most versions): G Major (O’Farrell/Pocket). Standard tuning. AB (O’Farrell, O'Neill): ABB (Gow/Repository): AABB (Gow/Carlin). “Old,” says Gow (1806). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 554 (appears as “Peggy Bawd”). Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 12. O’Farrell (National Irish Music for the Union Pipes), 1804; pg. 17. O’Farrell (Pocket Companion, vol. IV), c. 1810; pg. 92. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1979; No. 207, pg. 36.

X:1

T:Peggy Bawn

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

S:Gow – 3rd Repository  (1806)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

(A/B/)c | d2 (fd) (ec) | d>B G2 AF | D2 (FA) (Bc) | d4 (A/B/c) | d2 (fd) (ec) |

d>B G2 AF | D2 (FA) (Bc) | d4 |: ~d>e|f2 ~f2 g>e | (fd) B2 cd | e2 [A2e2] f>d |

(d2c2) (A/B/c) | d2 f>d ec | d>B G2 (A>F) | D2 (FA) (Bc) | d4 :|

                       

PEGGY BROWNE. AKA and see "Maggie Brown's Favorite," "Miss Brown's Fancy [2]," "Peggy Brown's Favorite," "Planxty Browne."

                       

PEGGY DARBY. The tune appears as “Peggy Darby, or The Dandies Irish” in vol. 3 of James Aird's Airs (the tune is better known as "Bonnie Lass o' Fyvie, O").     

                       

PEGGY GRIEVES ME. Scottish. The melody appears in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth, 1768.

                       

PEGGY, I MUST LOVE THEE. Scottish, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB.  Chappell (1859) asserts this tune was appropriated from the English "The Deel Assist the Plotting Whigs," composed by Purcell (from 180 Loyal Songs, 1685), a notion which John Glen (Early Scottish Melodies, 1900) dismisses as absurd. Glen prints the tunes side by side, and there in fact seems little resemblance between them. Playford published the “Peggy, I must love thee” air as “A New Scotch Tune” in his Apollo’s Banquet (fifth edition) of 1687 and Musick’s Handmaid (Part II, 1689, again, “composed by Purcell”). As “Peggy I Must Love Thee” it was published in Adam Craig’s Scottish collection (1730). Stenhouse, in notes to the Scots Musical Museum, maintains that the Scots air predated Purcell, and that Purcell “may have put a bass to it.” John Playford, in Apollo’s Banquet, noted that it was “A Scotch Tune in fashion.” Sets of words were published to the tune by Allan Ramsay in his Tea Table Miscellany (1724). Glen finds variants in the Leyden and the Blaikie manuscripts (1692), under the titles “Maggie I must love thee” and “Yet, Meggie, I must love thee.” The Blaikie air differs from Playford’s in the second strain, as does the “Magie I must love thee” in the Margaret Sinkler manuscript Music Book (1710). McGibbon (Scots Tunes, Book 1), c. 1746; pgs. 2-3. Maggie’s Music MM220, Hesperus – “Celtic Roots.”

X:1

T:Peggie I must love the(e)

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow”

S:McGibbon – Scots Tunes, Book 1 (1746)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

E | F2A2A3c | B>cBA “tr”F3E | F2A2 (A>B)(c>d) | “tr”B3A A3E | F2A2A2 (af) |

(e/f/e/c/) (d/c/B/A/) “tr”B3A | F2A2 (A>B) (c/B/c/d/) | “tr”B3A A2 (AB) |

c2e2 “tr”e3f | (e>f)(e>c) “tr”B3A | c2 (e>f) “tr”3e3f | g2(g>a) “tr”f3e | (f2{f/g/}a2) e2f2 |

c2 (ac) “tr”B3A | F2A2 (A>B)(c>d) | “tr”B3A A2 :: E | F2A2A3c | B>c (B/c/B/A/) “tr”F3E |

F2 (A>B) A2 (af) | (e/f/e/c/) (d/c/B/A/) “tr”B3A | F2A2 (A/B/c/d/) (e/c/B/A/) |

“tr”B3A A2 (A/B/B>A/B/4) | c2 (e>f) e3f | (e/f/e/c/) (e/c/B/A/) “tr”B3A | c2 e>f e3f |

g2 (g/f/g/)a/ “tr”f3e | f{g/f/e/f/}c/e/ f2 | (3c/B/A/ (3e/d/c/ ac “tr”B3A | F2A2 A>B (c/B/c/)d/ | “tr”B3A A2 :|

X:2

T:Scotch Tune in Fashion, A

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Playford – Apollo’s Banquet (1687)

K:G

D|E2G2G3B|AB AF E3D|E2G2 GA BG|A4 G3::c|B2d2d3e|de dB A3G|

B2d2d3e|=f2 e/f/g e3d|d2 e/f/g d3B|A2=f2A3B|D3E GA BG|A4 G3||

X:3

T:Yet Meggie I must love thee

M:C

L:1/8

S:Blaikie manuscript (1692)

K:G

D2|E2G2G3B|AB AG G3D|EF G2 GA BG|A4G2::G2|B2d2d3e|

de dB A3G|B2d2d3d|edef d3d|e2g2d3B|A2g2 A3G|D2G2 GABG|A4 G2||

X:4

T:Deel assist the plotting Whigs, The

M:C

L:1/8

S:180 Loyal Songs  (1685)

K:G

dB|G3A B2 AG|A2e2e2g2|d3B dB AG|AB AF D2 dB|G3A B2 AG|

A2e2e3f|gab a gf eg|B2d2d2||a2|e3d ef ga|b3a g2G2|A3A cB cd|

e2c2c2Ac|BA BG ge dB|AB AG E3A|D3d AB cd|B2A2G2||

                       

PEGGY IS A BRIGHT YOUNG THING. English, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Kennedy (Traditional Dance Music of Britain and Ireland: Reels and Rants), 1997; No. 155, pg. 37.

           


PEGGY IS YOUR HEAD SICK?  AKA and see "Mourne Mountains [1]," "The Purty Girl," "Bascadh Thomais Mhic an Bhaird." Irish, Air (2/4 time). Ireland, County Louth. E Major. Standard tuning. AB. When played as a dance tune it is often called “The Long Hills of Mourne,” remarked George Petrie, although it does not appear to resemble the tune that usually goes by that name (which is also called “The Old Bush Reel”). Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 768, pg. 192.

X:1

T:Peggy is your head sick?

T:Long Hills of Mourne, The

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 768

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:E

G/E/ E/G/ EC/D/ | G/F/ F/G/ FE/C/ | B/C/ E/F/ G/F/ G/B/ | c/>d/ e/B/ (A/G/) .F/.E/ |

G/E/ E/>F/ EC/B,/ | G/F/ F/>G/ FE/C/ | B,/C/ E/F/ G/F/G/B/ | c/d/ e/B/ A/G/ F/E/ ||

B/e/ e/>f/ e c/B/ | c/f/ f/g/ f e/c/ | B/c/ e/f/ g/f/ e/c/ | B/c/4d/4 e/B/ A/G/ F/E/ |

B/e/ e/>f/ e c/B/ | c/f/ f/>g/ f e/c/ | B/c/ e/f/ g/f/ e/c/ | B/c/4d/4 e/B/ A/G/ F/E/ ||

                       

PEGGY LEVIN (Ni Sleabin). AKA and see "Bonny Portmore,” “Margaret Lavin.”

                       

PEGGY MENZIES. Scottish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 97. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 157.

X:1

T:Peggy Menzies

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)
Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

f|~g2 dg Bgdg|~g2 dB A2 AB|~g2 dg gaba|gedB A2A:|

|:B|dGdB dGdg|dGdB A2AB|dGdB gaba|gedB A2A:|

                       

PEGGY MORTON. Irish, Planxty (2/4 time). C Major. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 104, pg. 78‑79.

                       

PEGGY MORRISSEY.  AKA and see “Pretty Maggie Morrissey.”

 

PEGGY, MY DARLING. AKA ‑ "Peggy Aroon." Irish, Air (6/8 time). C Major. Standard tuning. One part. Source for notated version: "Patrick MacDowell, the distinguished sculptor, born in Belfast 1799, died in 1870" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 558, pgs. 295‑296.

 

PEGGY NA LEAVIEN. AKA and see "Bonny Portmore."

 

PEGGY NI LEAVAN. AKA and see "Bonny Portmore."

 

PEGGY, NOW THE KING'S COME. Northumbrian. Title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800.

 

PEGGY O'HARA'S WEDDING. Irish, Air (2/4 time, "with spirit"). G Major/G Mixolydian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. "The song of which this is the air is a comic or ironical description, in Irish, of the fun and rout at the wedding, very much celebrated in Connaught. A copy will be found in Hardiman's 'Iar Connaught,' p. 286: composed by MacSweeny, a Connaught poet. This air...(was) taken down by Forde from Paddy Conneely junior" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 477, p. 264.

X:1

T:Peggy O’Hara’s Wedding

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”With spirit”

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

d/>c/ | .B.B.c.A | .A.G.G.G | .F.G.A.B | .c2 d>c | .B.B.c.A | G2 AB | {B}c2 AF | G2G ||

c | de=fg | =fdcc | de=fg | =fd c2 | de=fg | de=fg | aage | =f2 ec | BBcA | .A.G.GA/B/ | c2 AF | G3 ||

           

PEGGY ON THE SETTLE (Mairgreadin Air An Suideacan). AKA and see "Kitty Clover('s)," "Boil the Breakfast Early." Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AAB. See also the related “In and Out (of) the Harbor.” O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 1245, p. 234. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907; No. 518, p. 97.

X:1

T:Peggy on the Settle

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 518

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Ador

egfd eA (3AAA|edBd eA (3AAA|egfd eA (3AAA|BGdc BGBd:|

||edef g2 ag|edef gdBd|edef g2 ga|bgaf gdBd|

edef g2 ag|edef gdBd|gdBd g2 ga|bgaf gfed||

           

PEGGY RYAN’S FANCY. AKA and see “The Murroe Polka.” Irish, Polka. Ireland, County Kerry. See also “Peg Ryan.” Shanachie 79025, Chieftains -  “Chieftians 5" (appears as 2nd of “Three Kerry Polkas”).

           

PEGGY WAS MISTRESS OF MY HEART. Irish, Air (6/8 time). G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. "A 'Cailying' tune. A 'Caily' (Irish 'Ceilidhe') is an evening visit to a neighbour's house, chiefly to have a gossip. Usually there were several persons together; and certain lively songs were often sung during such visits" (Joyce). Source for notated version: Hugh O'Beirne, professional fiddler from Ballinamore, Co. Leitrim, c. 1846 (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 595, p. 309.

 

PEGGY WAS THE PRETTIEST LASS IN AW THE TOWN. Scottish. Published in Henry Playford's 1700 collection of Scottish dance music.

 

PEGGY WHIFFLE'S. AKA and see similar tunes "Ratcatcher's Reel," "Clem Titus Jig," "Evansville Reel," "Wide Awake Reel." American, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 40.

 

PEGGY’S JIG. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. Composed by Ingonish, Cape Breton, fiddler Mike MacDougall (1928-1982), for his wife Peggy Donovan. Atlantica Music 02 77657 50222 26, Richard Wood - “Atlantic Fiddles” (1994).

X:1

T:Peggy's Jig

M:6/8

L:1/8

C:Mike MacDougall

R:Jig

K:G

c| BdB GBd| cec E2 G| FAF DFA| GBG D2 c| BdB GBd|

!| cec E2 G| FED AFD| G3 G| B| ded dBd| gbg d2 g| faf A2 B|

!|cec B2 c| ded dBd| gbg d2 g|1 fed cAF| G3 G :|2 fed afd| g3 g|

                       

PEGGY'S MILL. AKA and see "Lass of Patie's Mill."

                       

PEGGY'S NETTLES. Irish. Composed by Noel Ryan, guitar player for the group Danú, in honor of his mother who once roused him from a deep sleep on evening, armed with stinging nettles in case verbal persuasion did not work. Shanachie 78030, Danú – “Think Before You Think” (2000).

                       

PEGGY’S WALTZ. Irish, Waltz. Composed by guitarist Denis Cahill. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - “The Lonesome Touch” (1997).

                       

PEGGY'S WEDDING [1]. English, Scottish; Jig. D Major (Kennedy, Raven): C Major (Athole, Gow). Standard tuning. AAB (Gow): AABB (Athole, Kennedy, Raven). John Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing of this tune in Robert Bremner's 1757 collection; it also is contained in the 1768 Gillespie Collection of Perth. Bremner (Scots Reels), 1757; pg. 54 (appears as “Peggie’s Wedding”). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 401. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 21. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 2, 1954; pg. 35. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 106. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 110.

X:1

T:Peggie’s Wedding [1]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

cdc c2c|ceg gec|cdc c2c|Bcd dBG|cdc c2c|ceg gec|faf ege|Bcd dBG:|

|:cdc g2c|e2c g2c|cdc g2c|Bcd dBG|cdc gec|edc gec|faf ege|Bcd dBG:|

 

PEGGY'S WEDDING [2]. AKA and see “The Green Meadow(s) [1],” “Over the Moors to Maggie [2],.” Irish, Country Dance (4/4 time, "with spirit"). G Major. Standard tuning. AABCC. Source for notated version: "Michael Walsh, a good professional fiddler, Strokestown, Co. Roscommon" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 673, pgs. 336‑337.

X:1

T:Peggy’s Wedding [2]

M:C

L:1/8

R:”A Country Dance”

N:”With spirit: not too fast.”

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Songs and Music (1909), No. 674

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

GFGA BABd | efed BAGA | BAAB A2 GE | EAAc BAGE | GFGA BABd | efed BAGA |

DGGA G2 ED | EGGA G2G2 :| bagb agef | gfge dBGB | eaab a2 ge | baab a2 ga |

bagb agef | gfge dBGB | egga g2 ed | egga g2g2 | bagb bgef | gfge dBGB | eaab a2 ge |

baab a2 ga | babg agae | gfge dBGB | egga g3 ed | egga g2g2 |: efed Bdde | gfge dBGB |

EAAB A2 GE | EAAB A2A2 | efed Bddf | efge dBAG | DGGA G2 ED | DGGA G2G2 :||

 

PEGING AWL. English. England, Northumberland. One of the "missing tunes" from William Vickers' 1770 Northumbrian dance tune manuscript. Perhaps the folksong "Peg and Awl," referring to cobbler's tools.

 

PEGLEG. Old-Time, Breakdown. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: Lotus Dickey (Indiana) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 1, 1994; pg. 183. Bear Wallow BUC-215, Roger Howell - "A Plain Story Simply Told."

 

PEIS-RINCE UI LANNAGAIN. AKA and see "Lannigan's Ball."

 

PELL-MELL. AKA and see “Fy, Nay, Prithee John.”

 


PELTAN LEANBAC, AN (The Childlike Star). Irish, Air (4/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard tuning. AB. A version of Petrie’s “John Doe” (No. 738). Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 1520, pg. 380.

 

PELTON LONNIN'. AKA and see "Felton Lonnin(g)."

 

PEN RHAW (The Spade Head). Welsh, Air. The tune appears in Edward Jones’s first edition of Musical and Poetical Relicks of the Welsh Bards (1784). Kidson (Groves) says there is considerable affinity in this melody with “John Come Kiss Me Now,” a tune common in England and Scotland in the 16th and 17th centuries.

 

PENINGTON’S RANT.  English, Jig. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody was first published by John Johnson in his Choice Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 6 (London, 1748). Johnson also published (in 1748) a melody called “Pennington’s Maggot,” so perhaps Pennington was a dancing master. Thompson (Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 1), 1757; No. 30.

X:1

T:Penington’s Rant

M:6/8

L:1/8

N:The ‘E’ note in the fourth measure of the 2nd part may be played natural.

B:Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 1 (London, 1757)

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bb

(A/B/4c/4)|:B>AG F>ED|EFG FED|cde dcB|AcB AGF|BAG FED|

EFG FED|FAe dec|1 (B3 B2) (A/B/4c/4):||2 (B3 B2)c||:dcB fed|cBA edc|

BAG dcB|ABG ^FED|D^FA cBA|Bcd edc|d^fg BcA|(G3 G2) (A/B/4/c/4):||

 

PENLLYN. A sonata for bardic harp, from 17th century manuscripts. Rounder 3067, Alan Stivell ‑ "Renaissance of the Celtic Harp" (1982).

 

PENNAN DEN. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by James Watt (1832‑1909) of Pennan, near Fraserburgh. Watt in his early years was a sailor and fisherman who later became a teacher in his village. He made some violins, but was more in demand as a dance‑fiddler. Source for notated version: George Riddell (Scotland) [Henderson]. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 100. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935.

 

PENNILESS TRAVELLER, THE (An Gabalac Gan Airgiod). AKA and see "When Sick is it Tea You Want? [1]" "Go to the Devil and Shake Yourself [1]," "Come From the Devil and Shake Yourself." Irish, Double Jig. C Major (O’Neill/MOI): G Major (O’Neill/Waifs). Standard tuning. AABB (O’Neill/MOI): AABB’ (O’Neill/Waifs). O’Neill (1922) remarks: “The above is an old strain which appeared in print at least as early as 1798 in a much simpler setting under the name "Go to the Devil and Shake Yourself". It was included in six Collections of Country Dances published in London in that year. It has been confused with "Get Up Old Woman and Shake Yourself", an entirely different  tune. None of the names appear in Bunting, Petrie or Joyce collections. Another name for this tune is ‘When You Are Sick 'Tis Tea You Want’, but a tune so named in the Petrie Collections is a different 8 bar melody.” O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 772, pg. 144. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 156.

X:1

T:Penniless Traveller, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Capt. F. O'Neill

Z:Paul Kinder

K:G

B/2c/2|dgg gfe|ded dBc|dgg g2 a|bag "tr"e2 d|

dgg gfe|ded dBd|gbg a/2b/2c'a|bgg g2:|

|:B/2c/2|dBG GFG|ecc c2 d|eAA ABG|Edd d2 B|

1dgg gfe|ded dBd|gbg a/2b/2c'a|bgg g2:|

2dgg faa|gbb abc'|d'bg a/2b/2c'a|bgg g2||

 

PENNINGTON'S FAREWELL. American. Information about the piece with a story similar to the "MacPherson's Lament" or "Last of Callahan" type of gallows tunes, comes from UCLA's D. K. Wilgus, in his paper "The Hanged Fiddler Legend in Anglo-American Tradition." Edward Alonzo Pennington was a Kentucky businessman known for his sharp deals, a passer of counterfeit money, a horse thief and murderer--and a fiddler--whose career came to an untimely end in 1845.  It seems that Pennington, feeling that he was to imminently be brought to justice for his misdeeds, fled to Texas just ahead of the authorities.  Given the state of communications and the obscure state of the law in Texas at the time (Texas was still a territory and nominally part of Mexico until 1846), Pennington might have remained at large in the fringes of the west, as did so many others with shady pasts.  However, Pennington, perhaps unwisely, continued to publicly exercise his talent on the fiddle and was recognised one night by a Kentucky visitor as he played for a camp dance in Lamar County.  He was executed for his crimes, but, similar to MacPherson or Callahan, when brought to the gallows he asked for his fiddle and played a tune he composed called "Pennington's Farewell," then recited the following rhyme:

***

Oh, dreadful, dark and dismal day,

How have my joys all passed away!

My sun's gone down, my days are done,

My race on earth has now been run.

***

This couplet will be recognised as a standard "goodnight" form typical of 17th century ballads, but also as the opening stanza of the ballad "Frankie Silvers" about a North Carolina murderess hanged in 1833. Wilgus states he could find no published record of the tune, but an elderly distant relative of Pennington's who fiddled in her earlier years, remembered "Pennington's Farewell" as the piece better known as "Blackberry Blossoms," a variant of "The Last of Callahan." When Wilgus, in 1965, was able to record live performances of the tune entitled "Pennington's Farewell" he found the association to be correct, though none of the fiddlers knew the hanged-fiddler story attached to the melody. Billy Cornette says his Kentucky ancestors called the tune known as “Too Young to Marry” (and a myriad of other titles) by the name of “Pennington’s Farewell.”

 

PENNSYLVANIA FIFERS, THE. AKA and see "Jaybird." American, Reel. USA, southwestern Pa. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. A version of the British air "Ladies Briest/Breast Knot(s)," better known in the United States as "Jaybird." Source for notated version: Clyde Lloyd (fifer from Indiana County, Pa., 1952) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 176C, pg. 128.

 

PENNSYLVANIA POLKA. American, Polka. USA, Pa. In the repertory of Buffalo Valley, Pa., region dance fiddler Harry Daddario.

 

PENNSYLVANIA QUICKSTEP [1], THE. AKA and see "The Village Quickstep," "Bartlett's Quickstep," "Minnie Moore." American, March (6/8 time). USA, southwestern Pa. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB'C. A fife march popular in the Civil War. Sources for notated versions: Hiram Horner (fifer from Westmoreland and Fayette Counties, Pa., 1960) and Edward Mundell (Greene County, Pa., 1944) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 634A‑B, pgs. 558‑559.

 

PENNSYLVANIA QUICKSTEP [2], THE. AKA and see "The Squirrel Hunters," "Squirrel Hunting," "Dilly's Favorite," "Old Common Time," "N....r in/on the Woodpile [1]," "Jenny Put the Kettle On (We'll All Take Tea) [3]." American, March (2/4 time). USA, southwestern Pa. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AB. Source for notated version: Clyde Lloyd (fifer from Indiana County, Pa., 1952) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 220F, pg. 176.

 

PENNY CANDLE, THE. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Taylor (1922) notes this melody is a composition of influential Co. Tipperary button accordion player Paddy O'Brien (1922-1991, son of noted fiddler Dinny O'Brien), who named it after Maeve Binchy's novel Light a Penny Candle. Binchy was herself an admirer of Irish music. Taylor (Crossroads Dance), 1992; No. 16, pg. 14. Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies – “One and All: the best of Cherish the Ladies” (1998). Shaskeen - "Mouse Behind the Dresser."

           

PENNY WEDDING REEL. Scottish, Reel. D Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831). A ‘penny wedding’ is one in which the guests all contribute a dish for the after-ceremony celebration, or one in which the guests all contribute something to the new couple to defray the cost of the festivities. Sir David Wilkie (1785-1841) painted The Penny Wedding in 1818. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 311. Gow (Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels), 1807; pg. 13.

X:1

T:Penny Wedding Reel

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel

C:Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831)

B:Gow – Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels (1809)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

A,|DA2F ECGE|DA2G AD d=B|cGAF ECGE|DAcE {E}D2D:||f|

(d/e/f/g/) af gcge|(d/e/f/g/) af adfa|(d/e/f/g/) af gcge|

f>d e>^c d2 Df|(d/e/f/g/) af gcge|(d/e/f/g/) af gefd|ecd=B cCGE|DdcE {E}D2D||

           

PENNYCUICK HOUSE.  Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). C Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. Composed by Niel Gow, Jr. (c. 1795-1823), the son of Nathaniel Gow and the grandson of family scion Niel Gow. While it looks like a jig on paper, Gow directed it be played ‘Slowly’. The younger Niel briefly joined his father’s music publishing firm, and was showing great promise as a talented performer and composer before his untimely death. His father collected and published his son’s compositions in a Collection of Slow Airs, Strathspeys and Reels, being the Posthumous Compositions of the late Niel Gow, Junior, dedicated to the Right Honourable, the Earl of Dalhousie, by his much obliged servant, Nathaniel Gow (Edinburgh, 1849). Pennycuick House, Midlothian, Scotland, takes its name from the nearby village of Pennycuick, anciently spelled Penicok, from the Gaelic Pen-y-coc, or the Cuckoo’s hill. The mansion, which featured a Grecian portico of eight columns, was built in 1761 by Sir James Clerk, Baronet, and was surrounded by a wooded park. Johnson (A Twenty Year Anniversary Collection), 2003; p. 9.

X:1

T:Pennycuick House

M:6/8

L:1/8

C:Niel Gow Jr.

R:Slow Air

S:Niel Gow Jr. – Collection of Slow Airs, Strathspeys and Reels, etc.  (1849)

K:C

G|{F}EDE CEG|”tr”c>de G2A|~c>dc e2d|cGE [B2D2]G|{F}EDE CEG|

“tr”c>de G2A|cdc ~fga|gec c2::f|e2f gaf|efd cde|(gf).e (ed).c|

(cB).A (AG).F|{F}EDE CEG|cde G2A|cdc ~fga|gec c2:|

 

PEN-RHAW. Welsh, Air. A traditional Welsh harp air. Robin Huw Bowen remarks that the piece has been a vehicle in the past for penillion, a type of singing verses to harp airs which demands that the singer start after the harp, render the song (of a different metre and phrase length) in counterpoint, and finish at the same time! Flying Fish FF70610, Robin Huw Bowen – “Telyn Berseiniol Fy Ngwlad/The Sweet Harp of My Land” (1996).

           


PENOBSCOT MEMORY. New England, Waltz. G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. A modern composition by Vince O'Donnell. Hinds/Hébert (Grumbling Old Woman), 1981; p. 32.

           

PENRUDDOCK.  English, Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). A Minor (‘A’ part) & A Major (‘B’ part). Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. A modern composition by Brian Jenkins. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; pg. 120 (appears as “Sleeping in the Attic”, the name of a country dance by Philippe Callens set to the tune).

 

PENTLAND HILLS. AKA and see "The Battle of Pentland Hills." Scottish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AAB (Hardie): AABBCCDD (Johnson). Composed by James Oswald (1711‑69) of Dumfermline and published in his Caledonian Pocket Companion (1747‑c.1769). Oswald lived varioulsy in Edinburgh and, to the Scottish capitol's loss, from 1741 in London where he was a dancing master, singer, composer and music publisher. Johnson (1984) thinks it probably dates to the time of Oswald's Edinburgh years in the late 1730's. It also appears in Davie's Caledonian Repository (1829, 1850) and in Flores Musicae (where the title is perhaps mistakenly "The Battle of Pentland Hills"‑‑there was a battle in those hills {at Rullion Green in 1666}, says Johnson, but the tune is clearly a pastoral air and not a battle piece). The Pentlands are a range of hills south‑west of Edinburgh which were used for hunting and hawking in the days of King Robert the Bruce in the early part of the 14th century. Neil (1991) anecdotally relates:

***

The story of the 'Pentland Deer Hunt' is described by Will Grand

(FSA Scotland). Sir William wagered with King Robert that the

two royal hounds, 'Help' and 'Hold', would kill a white deer,

released for the dogs to chase 'before she crossed the March

Burn in Glencorse valley or forfeit his life.' Fortunately St.

Clair won the wager and 'in gratitude for his deliverance', he

is said to have built the Church of St. Katherine‑in‑the‑Hopes.

***

Source for notated version: Flores Musicae, 1773‑c.1775 (p. 53) [Johnson]. Davies, Caledonian Repository (Book 1, 2nd Series), 1850. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; p. 46. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1984; No. 21, pp. 51‑52. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 19, p. 25.

           

PEOPLE’S CHOICE, THE. Irish, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, writer and musician Bill Black. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 182.

X:1

T: The People's Choice

C: © B. Black

Q: 320

R: jig

M: 6/8

L: 1/8

K: D

D | FED AFA | BGB Bcd | fdB AFA | dAF ECE |

FED AFA | BGB Bcd | fdd add | cec d2 :|

e | fed edc | dcB AFA | fdd bag | fga ece |

fed edc | dcB AFA | fdd add | cec d2 :|

           

PEPIN ARSENAULT. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. G Dorian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AA’B. Composed by Inverness, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, fiddler Jerry Holland. Cranford (Jerry Holland’s), 1995; No. 191, p. 54. Fiddlesticks cass., Jerry Holland - “Lively Steps” (1987). Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992).

           

PEPPER'S BLACK [1]. English, Country Dance Tune (6/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. The air was published by Playford in his English Dancing Master of 1650, though it appears it is considerably older. “Pepper’s Black” was mentioned by Nashe as a dance tune in a 1596 work, Have with you to Saffron-Walden:

***

Dick Harvey…having preacht and beat downe three pulpits in

inveighing against dauncing, one Sunday evening, when his

wench or friskin was footing it aloft on the greene, with foote

out and foote in, and as busie as might be at Rogero, Baselino,

Turkelony, All the flowers of the broom, Pepper is black, Greene

Sleeves, Peggy Ramsey, came sneaking behind a tree, and lookt on,…

***

Chappell records that a 1569 ballad by Elderton, entered at the Stationers' Hall and called “Prepare ye to the Plough,” was directed to be sung to “Pepper’s Black.” Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Time), vol. 1, 1859; p. 290. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; p. 41 (a facsimile copy of Playford’s printing).

X:1

T:Pepper’s Black [1]

M:6/4

L:1/8

S:Chappell – Popular Music of the Olden Times (1859)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G2 | F4 D2 A4A2 | F3E D2 A4D2 | G2A2G2 A3 Bcd | B6 G6 ||

A2B2c2 c3c c2 | A2B2c2 c3B c2 | B2c2d2 d3 ecd | B6 G6 ||

 


PEPPER’S BLACK [2]. AKA and see “Kettledrum.” English, Country Dance Tune (2/2 time). A Minor. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. A different tune than “Pepper’s Black [1]." Sharp notes: “‘Peppars Black’ to the tune of ‘Kettledrum’.” Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1909; p. 63.

X:1

T:Pepper’s Black

M:2/2

L:1/8

S:Sharp – Country Dance Tunes  (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Minor

efgf e2d2|A2f2A2f2|efgf e2d2|A2f2 d4|efgf e2d2|A2f2A2f2|efgf e2d2|A2f2 d4||

efga g3a|g3a g2e2|fg a2a2^g2|a6 fg|agfe defd|e4 A4|F2A2A2f2|d8||

           

PER ROST VALS. Swedish, Waltz. G Major. Standard tuning. AA'BB. A traditional waltz, in the style of ("efter") one Per Rost. Source for notated version: Dave Kaynor (Montague, Mass.), learned from a group called Spaelimenninir [Matthiesen]. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 45.

                       

PERCY BROWN'S POLKA. English (originally), New England; Polka. C Major (Carlin): G Major (Callaghan). Standard tuning. ABC. Percy Brown (1903-) was an influential melodeon player from Aylsham, Norfolk. The ‘B’ part is shared with the Irish polka “I’ll Tell My Ma (When I go Home).” Callaghan (Hardcore English), 2007; pg. 46. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 8, pg. 18. Miller & Perron (101 Polkas), 1978; No. 90.

X:1

T:Percy Brown’s Polka

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Polka

S:Percy Brown (Aylsham, Norfolk)

K:G

D2B2 BA B2|D2B2 BA B2|D2B2 A2G2|F2E2A2E2|1

E2c2 cBc2|E2c2 cBc2|D2E2F2G2|A2F2E2D2:|2 E2c2 cBc2|

B2A2 A3G|G2F2E2F2|(G4 G4)||:D2G2B3B|c2B2B3B|

B2A2A3B|A2G2G4:|d2D2 DED2|E2c2c3A|c2E2F2E2|
D2d2 d3c|d2D DE D2|E2c2 c3A|G2F2E2F2|(G4 G4)||

           

PÈRE LEON. French-Canadian (?), Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AB (Silberberg): AA'BB'. Source for notated version: Sande Gillette [Silberberg]. Private collection (circulated among contra-dance musicians). Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 117.

X:1

T:Père Leon

L:1/8

M:C

K:G

(3DEF|G2 GF GEDC|~B,2 A,CB,G, G,2|B3B cBAG|FGAB A2 (3DEF|

G2 GF GEDC|~B,2 A,DB,G, G,2|B3B cBAG|1 FDEF G2:|2 FDEF G2G2||

B3B cBAG|BGBd gd (3BBB|B3B cBAG|FGAB A2 GA|BGBd cBAG|

BGBd gd (3BBB|BGBB cBAG|1 FDEF G2 GA:|2 FDEF G4||

           

PERFECT CURE, THE (An Uile-Íoc). AKA and see "The Long Dance," “Long John’s Wedding.” English, Irish; Single Jig. D Major (Kennedy, Raven): G Major (Williamson). Standard tuning. AABB. Paul Burgess (Tradtunes list 09.06.06) writes that this tune was originally a ‘novelty jumping song’ performed by J.H. Stead at various music halls in London, and cites one such venue as Weston’s Music Hall (later the Hackney Empire) in the 1850’s. It was composed as a ‘novelty schottische’, although the dotted duple rhythm has since been altered to triple time (a common enough occurrence in aurally learned traditional music). Burgess writes that the chorus to the song began: “Oh, I’m the Perfect Cure…”, which became a popular expression in Victorian London. Alfred Rosling Bennet, in his 1924 reminiscence London and Londoners in the Eighteen-Fifties and Sixties [Chapter VI, Street Entertainers] remembered: “About 1860 came Stead with his ‘Perfect Cure’, which raged through the land like an influenza. We had a lot of musical education since then, but what modern composition has rivalled the renown of that to-all-appearance silly production? In later years it was stated that this popular performed was a relative of Mr. ‘Pall-Mall’ Stead” (a reference to the editor of the Pall Mall Gazette from 1883 to 1880, William Thomas Stead). It has been suggested that spirits and other intoxicants (such as laudanum) are ‘the perfect cure.’ 

***

Parenthetically, Lord Henry Cockburn (1779-1854), in his posthumously published memoir Memorials of His Time (1856),  records the following anecdote of the health system of Edinburgh c. 1800 (where each physician seemed to have his own idiosyncratic curatives), and exposes period attempts to extract medical proficiency:

***

In 1800 the people of Edinburgh were much occupied about the removal of an evil

in the system of their Infirmary; which evil, though strenuously defended by able men,

it is difficult now to believe could ever have existed. The medical officers consisted

at that time of the whole members of the Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons, who

attended the hospital by a monthly rotation; so that the patients had the chance of

an opposite treatment, according to the whim of the doctor, every thirty days. Dr.

James Gregory, whose learning extended beyond that of his profession, attacked

this absurdity in one of his powerful, but wild and personal, quarto pamphlets. The

public was entirely on his side; and so at last were the managers, who resolved

that the medical officers should be appointed permanently, as they have ever since

been. Most of the medical profession, including the whole private lecturers, and

even the two colleges, who all held that the power of annoying the patients in their

turn was their right, were vehement against this innovation; and some of them went

to law in opposition to it.   (pgs. 96-97).

***

Breathnach styles the melody as a single jig in 12/8 time. It is played as a slide in County Kerry. The first part of  the double jig “Long John’s Wedding” and “Long John’s Wedding March” are the same, although the second parts are not. See also the Orkney Islands tune “The Rope Waltz” for a tune with similar melodic material.

***

Source for a notated version: accordion player James Gannon (Streamstown, County Westmeath) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRÉ IV), 1996; No. 66, pg. 33. Kennedy (Fiddler’s Tune Book), vol. 2, 1954; pg. 46. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 101. Townsend (A Second Collection of English Country Dance Tunes), 1983. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 18. Claddagh Records CC56CD, Seán Ó Duinnshléibhe – “Beauty an Oileáin: Music and Song of the Blasket Islands.”

See also listing at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:Perfect Cure, The

L:1/8

M:6/8

K:D

A/G/|FGA D2d|cde A2G|FGA D2F|(E3 E2)A/G/|FGA Dcd|

cde A2G|FGA ABc|d3 D2::d/e/|fed e2d|cdB A2e|

fed c2d|e3a2g|fed e2d|cdB A2B|ABA B2^c|d3D2:|

           

PERFECT WIFE, THE. AKA and see “(An) Phis Fhluich,” “O’Farrell’s Welcome to Limerick.”

           

PERHAPS YOU AND I WILL BE JUDGED IN ONE DAY. Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard tuning. One part. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 692, pg. 174.

X:1

T:Perhaps you and I will by judged in one day
M:3/4
L:1/8

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 692

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

GA | B2e2d2 | e2f2g2 | e2d2B2 | B4 Bc | _d2c2B2 | c2=d2e2 | B2A2 FE | F4 _dc |

B2A2F2 | E2E2 FG | A2B2 GE | F4 B>A | B2e2 “tr”de/f/ | e2B2 AB | F2E2E2 | E4 ||

 

PERIL WALTZ. French‑Canadian, Waltz. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AA'BB'. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 84, pg. 55.

 


PERIWIG, THE (A' Phiorbhuic). AKA ‑ "Fry'd Periwig,” “Pirriwig." Scottish, Pipe Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AB (Surenne): AAB (Fraser). Periwig is a corrupt form of the French word perruque, which itself stems from the Latin word pilus, or hair. The wigs came into fashion probably due to the French monarch Louis XIV, who had long curled locks much admired when he was young, but who became increasingly bald early.  When Louis started wearing a wig they immediately became status symbols of one’s importance in the French court, and the fashion quickly spread to other countries. In 1655 Louis appointed 48 wig-makers, and the first wigmakers guild was established in Paris the next year. Wigs were not cheap due to the relative scarcity of quality materials and high demand, and there were periodic concerns about dubious origins of raw materials. In England during the Great Plague of 1665 and 1666, there were even rumours that the hair of plague victims was used in the wigs' manufacture.  Upon the death of Louis in 1715 the fashion for large, elaborate periwigs began to wane, and by 1720 shorter, smaller wigs were to be seen. Apropos of Fraser’s story below, the wearing of wigs was adopted by the clergy only some 20 years after coming into fashion with the laity, as they were initially seen as worldly and vain.  Come they did, however, and periwigs stayed in fashion with clergy again some 20 years longer than with the laity, who had adopted the smaller wigs of the 18th century.

***

By the beginning of the 19th century the fashion for wigs in Britain was over, save for a few conservative circles.  Henry Cockburn (1779-1854), writing in his book Memorials of His Time (published posthumously in 1856), writes of older Scots gentry of the era and their wariness of fashions that might appear disloyal:

***

In nothing was the monarchical principle more openly displayed or insulted than in the

adherence to, or contempt of, hair-powder. The reason of this was, that this powder,

and the consequent enlargement and complexity of the hair on which it was displayed,

were not merely the long-established badges of aristocracy, but that short and undressed

crops had been adopted in France. Our loyal, therefore, though beginning to tire of the

greasy and dusty dirt, laid it on with profuse patriotism, while the discontented exhibited

themselves ostentatiously in all the Jacobinism of clean natural locks.   (pg. 62)

***

Captain Simon Fraser, in his note on the tune, suggests the notion that wigs were becoming old-fashioned even in the Highlands at the end of the 18th century.

***

"Whether the subject matter of this air was a real or imaginary periwig, the editor is not prepared to assert; but so popular was it, as sung by the gentlemen mentioned in the prospectus, that a roar of laughter succeeded each verse, infinitely longer than any verse of the song, in every company where they were prevailed upon to attempt it. An anecdote told of Mr. Fraser of Culduthel, renders it probable that he was the composer of this beautiful sprightly air. He was at a baptismal entertainment at the editor's grandfather's, where the presence of the them minister of Boleskine, a very old and venerable clergyman, could not restrain his propensity for exciting mirth. He sat next but one to the minister, and found means, over his neighbor's shoulder, to tickle below the parson's large wig with a long feather, or blade of corn, or some such thing. As the glass went round, the old man got very uneasy, but suspected nobody; he at last got up in a rage, dreading an earwig or spider had got into his wig, and shook it over the blazing fire, but unfortunately lost his hold of it. It was too fat to admit of salvation; and with the immoderate laugh excited, it remained frying there, till it had almost suffocated the company, whilst the minister's bald pate produced a second laugh at his expense, in which he partook with the greatest good humor, and enjoyed it more when told how it happened. The real name of the air is the 'Fry'd Periwig', rendering this its probable origin; but the song turns it into a thousand ideal shapes, which nobody could better delineate than the adept who thus gave it the first celebrity"

***

A similarly titled reel in E Minor is "The Pirriwig." Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 74, pg. 27. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852; pg. 121. Maggies’s Music MM220, Hesperus – “Celtic Roots.”

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

X:1

T:Periwig, The

T:A’ Phiorbhuic

M:C

L:1/8

R:Pipe Reel

S:Fraser Collection  (1874)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

B|:g3b agfa|gfeg dB B2|g3b agfa|gef^d e/e/e g2|

g3b agfa|gfeg dBBd|gfgb agfa|gef^d e/e/e g2:|

|:dB B/B/B dBBg|eBBA GEEg|dB B/B/B dBBa|gef^d e/e/e g2|

dB B/B/B dBBg|eBBA GEEF|dB B/B/B dBBa|gef^d e/e/e g2:||

           

PERNOD. Scottish, Waltz. B Minor. Standard tuning. ABB'. The first half of the tune was composed in 1984 by Scottish fiddler Johnny Cunningham at a cafe in Paris, while drinking Pernod, and the second part was written in the Isle of Skye, with Michael O'Domhnaill [Matthiesen]. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 44. Green Linnet - "Relativity."

           

PERPETUAL MOTION. English, Jig. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. Composed in 1990 by John Stapleton. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol.. 2), 2005; pg. 99.

 

PERRIE WERRIE, THE. AKA – “Peerie Weerie,” "Pirrie Wirrie." AKA and see “The Avonmore,” “The Blackwater Foot/Reel.” Scottish, Reel. G Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AAB. ‘Perrie’ or ‘Peerie’ is dialect in the Shetlands and some parts of the Orkneys, meaning ‘little.’ Its origins are unclear, although the word may have derived from the Norwegian dialect word piren, meaning niggardly or thin. ‘Weer’ is sometimes used as a superlative of ‘wee’ or small. In this context the title may mean “the smallest of the small.” The AUP Scots dictionary gives the meaning of the phrase ‘peerie-weerie’ as a ‘small creature’ and says the it dates from the 19th century, found in Shetland and Perthshire. Irish variants go by the titles “The Avonmore” and “The Blackwater Foot” or “Blackwater Reel.” Paul Stewart Cranford remarks that Cape Breton fiddler Bill Lamey played the tune with a raised 7th tone, similar in mode to the Irish variants rather than the mixolydian (lowered 7th) mode Scottish settings. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 459. Cranford (Jerry Holland: The Second Collection), 2000; No. 199, pg. 74 (Cape Breton setting). Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pgs. 16-17. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 101. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 167. Culburnie CUL 113D, Alasdair Fraser & Tony MacManus – “Return to Kintail” (1999. Learned from Cape Breton fiddler Buddy MacMaster). Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned from Edinburgh fiddler John Martin). Rounder 82161-7032-2, Bill Lamey – “From Cape Breton to Boston and Back: Classic House Sessions of Traditional Cape Breton Music 1956-1977” (2000).

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:Perrie Werrie, The

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:The Athole Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

c|BGGA GAGc|BGGB gdec|BGGA GAGB|A=FFA c3:|

A|Bdde dedc|Bdde gdec|Bdde dedB|A=FFA c3A|

Bdde dedc|Bdde g2 d|gbeg dgBg|A=FFA c3||

                       

PERRODIN TWO STEP. AKA and see “Ardoin Two-Step,” "Two-Step des Perrodins." Cajun, Two‑Step (4/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB (Francois): AA'BB' (Reiner & Anick). The song is named for the Perrodin family and was first recorded by Angelas LeJeune, Dennis McGee and Ernest Fruge. A related tune is Merlin Fontenot's "Pas de Deux a Elia," according to Raymond Francois. Sources for notated versions: Cajun fiddler Wallace "Cheese" Read (b. Eunice, La., 1924) [Reiner & Anick]; Raymond Francois (La.) [Francois]. Francois (Yé Yaille Chère!), 1990; pgs. 248-249. Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 155. Arhoolie 5021, Wallace "Cheese" Read ‑ "Cajun House Party" (1979).

                       

PERRON'S REEL. New England, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by contra-dance musician and composer Bob McQuillen (Peterborough, New Hampshire) for fiddler/caller Jack Perron. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Addenda. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 2nd Edition, 2006; pg. 97.

                       


PERRY'S VICTORY [1]. AKA and see "Butler County." American, Jig or March (6/8 time). USA, southwestern Pa. G Major. Standard tuning. AB or AABB. Bayard (1981) says “Perry’s Victory” is at least as old as the 18th century, and has a "tantalizing" general resemblance to an Irish song tune called "A Ghaoith o'n Deas" (O Southern Breeze), with an especially close resemblance in the 'B' part. Also generally similar are the melodies "The Men of Garvagh" and "The Black Dance." The title references the victory on September 10, 1813, when Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry defeated and captured a British squadron of warships at the Battle of Lake Erie. The battle, fought during the War of 1812, secured control of Lake Erie for the United States and enabled General William Henry Harrison to conduct a successful invasion of Western Upper Canada. Harrison subsequently defeated the British and Indians at the Thames River on October 5, 1813. The dual victories of Lake Erie and the Thames provided an important morale boost to the young country and gave the United States a much stronger bargaining position at the peace talks. The Treaty of Ghent, signed on Christmas Eve 1814, ended the War 1812.

***

Perry’s Victory on Lake Erie

***

Sources for notated versions: The Pittsburg Pioneers (martial) Band via Hiram Horner (fifer from Westmoreland and Fayette Counties, Pa., 1960), the Hoge MS. (a Pennsylvania fife MS.), Mary Ann Rogers (fiddler from Greene County, Pa., 1930's) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 565A‑C, pgs. 501‑502.

 

PERRY'S VICTORY [2]. AKA and see "Haste to the Wedding [1]." From the Jabbour Library of Congress recording.

 

PERRY'S VICTORY [3]. American, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. A slight resemblance only to "Perry's Victory" [1]. Source for notated version: Wilhemina Scott [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 375. Rounder CD1518, Various Performers – “American Fiddle Tunes” (1971. Played by Mrs. Ben Scott on fiddle and Myrtle B. Wilkinson on banjo).

                       

PERRYSVILLE FAIR. American, Jig. USA, southwestern Pa. G Major: D Major: A Major. Standard tuning. AA'BB'. Sources for notated versions: Samuel Losch (Juniata County, Pa., 1930's), Irvin Yaugher (Fayette County, Pa., 1944), Charles Martin (Fayette County, Pa., 1946), Thomas Patterson (Elizabeth, Pa., 1930's), Curtis Cooper (Armstrong County, Pa., 1954), Edgar Work (Indiana County, Pa., 1949) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 520A‑F, pgs. 467‑469.

                                   

PERSANNE, LA.  French, Country Dance (2/4 time). C Major. Standard tuning. AABBCC. From the contradance book (tunes with dance instructions) of Robert Daubat (who styled himself Robert d’Aubat de Saint-Flour), born in Saint-Flour, Cantal, France, in 1714, dying in Gent, Belgium, in 1782. According to Belgian fiddler Luc De Cat, at the time of the publication of his collection (1757) Daubat was a dancing master in Gent and taught at several schools and theaters.  He also was the leader of a choir and was a violin player in a theater. Mr. De Cat identifies a list of subscribers of the original publication, numbering 132 individuals, of the higher level of society and the nobility, but also including musicians and dance-masters (including the ballet-master from the Italian opera in London). Many of the tunes are written with parts for various instruments, and include a numbered bass. Daubat (Cent Contredanses en Rond), 1757; No. 8.

X:1

T:Persanne, La

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Daubat – Cent Contredanses en Rond (1757), No. 8

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

C2 | C2C2 | C2{a}g2 | fdAB | cG C2 | C2C2 | C2 {a}g2 | fdAB | c2 :|

|: c’c’ | bg e^f | g2 =ff | e/a/g/f/ e/d/c/d/ | ec c’c’ | b/g/e/^f/ | g2 =ff | e/a/g/f/ e/d/c/B/ | c2 :|

|: E2 | GEFA | D2 F2 | ED/C/ B,C | DG, E2 | GEFA | D2F2 | {F}ED/C/ G,B, | C2 :|

                                   

PERSIAN DANCE, A. AKA and see "Gallopede," "Persian Ricardo." English, Country Dance Tune (2/4 time). England; Shropshire, Lincolnshire. G Major (Ashman): D Major (Sumner). Standard tuning. AABBCC. The tune is well-known nowadays under the “Gallopede” title, especially at New England contra dances, although many early 19th century English fiddlers’ manuscripts list it under the “Persian” or “Persian Ricardo” title. In addition to the printed collections below, it appears under that title in the separate 19th century music manuscripts of Lancashire musicians James Nuttall and William Tildsley. Source for notated version: a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Moore [Ashman]; the 1823-26 music mss of papermaker and musician Joshua Gibbons (1778-1871, of Tealby, near Market Rasen, Lincolnshire Wolds) [Sumner]. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; No. 61, pg. 24. Sumner (Lincolnshire Collections, vol. 1: The Joshua Gibbons Manuscript), 1997; pg. 22 (appears as “Persion”).

                                   

PERSIAN HUNT, THE. English, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), vol. 2, 1954; pg. 13. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 172.

                       

PERSIAN RICARDO. AKA and see "Gallopede," "Persian Dance." English, Country Dance Tune. The melody, commonly known as "Gallopede," appears under this title in the John Clare MS. (c. 1830’s). However, the tune was originally published in Preston’s 24 Country Dances for 1801.

           

PERSIE HOUSE REEL.  Scottish, Reel. E Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Kirkmichael, Perthshire, fiddler Robert Petrie. Petrie (Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances), 1790; pg. 20.

X:46

T:Persie House Reel

C:Robert Petrie

S:Petrie's Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances &c., 1790

Z:Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick'at'astound'dot'net>, 3/20/04

N:Petrie's First Collection, page 20

L:1/8

M:C

R:Reel

K:Em

B | E/E/E BE GBEG | FDAD FADF | GEBE  GBAc | BGAF  GEE :| f | Bgeg bgeg | dafg afdf |

Bgeg bgeg | BaTgf geef | Bgeg bgeg | dafg afdf | gef^d eBcA | GBAF  GEE |]

           

PERT, DECEITFUL MINX, THE (An Bhradog Bhreagach). AKA and see "An Bhradog Bhreagach."

                       

PERTH ASSEMBLY. Scottish, Reel. F Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AAB (Hunter, MacDonald, Stewart-Robertson): AABB (Cranford/Fitzgerald). Composed by Samson Duncan (1767‑1837), born at Kinclaven. He was an excellent fiddler and played with some of the most famous fiddlers and bands of the time‑‑Niel, Nathaniel and John Gow. He was also musician to the Laird on Aldie at Meidlour House.

***

Perth, Perth and Kinross, has been a settlement since Roman times and may be older. During the 15th century it was regarded as the capitol of Scotland. While the title “Perth Assembly” may refer to a hunting or gentlemen’s club or to the Presbyterian synod, there is some thought, perhaps outdated, that it references ancient ceremonies.  There is a sword dance called The Perth Assembly that is thought by some to have derived from a ceremonial dance performed by the powerful chieftains who gathered at Perth on occasion to swear allegiance to the king. Claymore swords were arranged in a circle on the ground, points pointing in, and the dance performed over them.

***

Sources for notated versions: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; Lowe’s Set, Book 1 [Henderson]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 157, p. 62. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 262. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; p. 150. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; p. 208. Ron Gonella – “Scottish Violin Music” (1966). Smiddymade SMD615, Pete Clark – Even Now: The Music of Niel Gow.”

X:1

T:Perth Assembly

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:The Athole Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

c|A2cA B2dB|c2Ac BGGB|A2cA Bcde|fcdB AFF:|

f|a2fa g2eg|~f2df ecce|d2Bd c2Ac|~B2GB AFFf|

aafa ggeg|ffdf ecce|ddBd ccAc|defg af~f||

                                               


PERTH HUNT, THE. AKA and see "The Perthshire Hunt," "The Boyne Hunt [1]."

 

PERTH RACES. Scottish, Jig. A Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB’. The melody appears in the 3rd collection of Malcolm MacDonald of Dunkeld, dedicated to Miss Drummond of Perth. See note for “Perthshire Hunt” for more on the races. MacDonald (A Third Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1792; p. 6.

X:1

T:Perth Races

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:”A Jigg”

S:MacDonald – 3rd Collection of Strathspey Reels (c. 1792)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

E | ABA cAc | ega ecA | def ecA | GBB B2E | ABA cAc | ega ecA | def Bed |

cAA A2 :: g | aga ecA | fga ecA | def ecA | GBB B2g |1 aga ecA | def ecA |

EFA Bed | cAA A2g :|2 aga fga | gba gfe | fga Bed | cAA A2 ||

           

PERTH WALTZ. AKA and see “Sheguiandah Bay.”

                                   

PERTHSHIRE AIR. Scottish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB'. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 2, 1988; pg. 33.


                       

PERTHSHIRE ASSEMBLY. See "Perth Assembly."

                       

PERTHSHIRE HUNT, THE. AKA ‑ "Perth Hunt." AKA and see "The Boyne Hunt [1],” "Highland Skip [2]," "Molly Maguire [2]," "Niel Gow's Reel [1]," “The Popcorn,” "Richmond Hill [2]," “The Sailor’s Trip to Liverpool.” Scottish, Reel. A Major (most versions): D Major (Miller): C Major (Jones). Standard tuning. AB (Surenne): AAB (most versions): AABB (Honeyman): AABB’ (Athole). The melody was composed by Miss M.(agdaline?) Stirling of Ardoch, Perthshire, around 1788. The Stirlings were an old Perthshire family, a branch of whom held lands in the parish of Muthill. Magdaline was a friend of Niel Gow and his son Nathaniel, who published a few of her compositions in their publications. She also published compositions under her own name. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) maintains the tune was commissioned for the Perthshire Hunt Ball. Hunter (1988) notes its opening "is one of the best examples of the use of the upstroke beginning to reels." As "Richmond Hill" the melody appears in George P. Knauff's Virginia Reels, volume II (Baltimore, 1839). In Ireland the tune goes by the title “The Boyne Hunt.”

***

This from George Penny’s Traditions of Perth, Containing Sketches of the Manners and Customs (1836, pg. 41).

***

Horseracing and archery were formerly much practiced in this quarter. It is a well authenticated

fact, that the affair of 1745 [i.e. Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite rebellion] was concocted at the

Perth races, which, prior to that period, were attended by noblemen from all parts of the kingdom.

The disastrous events of that year put a stop to these amusements, and scattered the Scottish

gentry to different parts of the continent; the effects of which were felt for 30 years. About 1784,

the exiled families began to return, and many of the forfeited estates being restored, a new impulse

was given to the country. Many of the gentlemen formed themselves into a body, styled the Perth-

shire Hunt, and a pack of fox hounds was procured, and placed under the management of an

experienced huntsman. Their meetings were held in October, and continued for a week, with balls

and ordinaries every day. When the Caledonian Hunt held their meetings here, the assemblies

continued for a fortnight. The present excellent racecourse was formed after the enlargement of 

the North Inch, and for a time the Perth Turf was among the best frequented in Scotland. Although

races have continued to be held pretty regularly, they have lately greatly declined in point of attraction;

seldom extending beyond two days, where they formerly occupied a week.

***

Source for notated version: Hector MacAndrew [Martin]. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Music), vol. 2, 1895; pg. 5. Gow (The 2nd Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels), 1788; pg. 2. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 34. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 247. Jones [Ed.] (Complete Tutor Violin), c. 1815; pg. 4. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; Set 10, No. 2, pg. 8 (appears as "The Perth Hunt"). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 19. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 124. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; vol. 3, No. 4. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 29. Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904; pg. 104. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 4. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852; pg. 62. IRC Records, Michael Coleman - “The Musical Glory of Old Sligo” (1967).

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:Perth Hunt, The

T:Perthshire Hunt, The

L:1/8

M:C|

S:Reel

B:The Athole Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

F|E2 CE A,ECE|A,ECE FB,B,F|~E CE A,ECA|ceBd cAA:|

|:e|cAeA fAeA|cAeA fBBe|1 cAeAfAeA|EFAB cAA:|2 ceAc dfBc|EFAB cAA|]

“variations:last ending”

ceAc dfBa|gbeg aAA|]

X:2

T:Perthshire Hunt

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel

C:Miss Stirling of Ardoch

S:Gow – 2nd Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels (1788)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

F|”tr”E2 CE A,ECE|A,ECE FB,B,F|”tr”E2 CE A,AcA|ceBd cAA:||

e|(c/B/A) eA fAeA|(c/B/A) ec fBBe|(c/B/A) eA fAeA|”tr”E>FAB cAAe|

(c/B/A) eA fAeA|(c/B/A) ec fBBd|ceAc dfB>c|”tr”EFAB cAA||

                       

PERTHSHIRE LASSES, THE. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c), 1866; No. 39, pg. 15.

                       

PERTHSHIRE VOLUNTEERS. Scottish, Strathspey or Highland Schottische. A Major. Standard tuning. AB (Kerr): AAB (most versions). The Perthshire Volunteers were the 90th Light Infantry Regiment, who later became the second battalion of the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). The regiment was raised in 1794 by Mr. Thomas Graham, Laird of Balgowan, afterwards Lord Lynedoch, on his return from the siege Toulon where he had gone as a volunteer.  The King gave permission only reluctantly to Graham, who despite his volunteering had very little military experience, but Graham received advice and assistance from Lord Moira, who had much military experience in the American wars. The uniform consisted of the regular red coat, faced with buff, although the men wore light grey cloth pantaloons, leading to the corps being dubbed the “Perthshire Grey-Breeks.” The regiment served with distinction in Egypt at the beginning of the 19th century, then in Ireland and the East Indies during most of the Napoleonic period. According to Keith MacDonald's Skye Collection the melody was composed by one "Miss Sterling" (who composed "Perthshire Hunt"??). All other volumes omit composer credit, including Gow (1800). Source for notated version: “As played by Alex. F. Skinner,” who was J. Scott’s older brother, and a powerful violinist in his own right [Skinner]. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1989; No. 204. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Music), vol. 2, 1895; pg. 6. Gow (Fourth Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels), 2nd ed., originally 1800; pg. 28. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; No. 198, pg. 23. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 16. Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904; pg. 91. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 4. Beltona BL2096 (78 RPM), Edinburgh Highland Reel and Strathspey Society (1936).

See also listing at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

X:1

T:Perthshire Volunteers

M:C

L:1/8

S:Strathspey

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

A|E>A c/d/e c2 A>c|d>B dcBA G<BB>d|c>A c/d/e c2 A<c|d>fe>d c<AA:|

||g|a>e a/g/f/e/ a2 e<c|d>B d/c/B/A/ G<BB>g|a>e a/g/f/e/ a2 e<c|d>B d/c/B/A/ E<AA>d|

c>eG>e F>dE>c|d>B d/c/B/A/ G<BB>d|c>ed>f e<ag<b|a/g/f/e/ a>e c<AA|]

X:2

T:Perth-Shire Volunteer's Strathspey

S:Petrie's Second Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances &c.

Z:Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick'at'astound'dot'net>, 6/5/04

N:Petrie's Second Collection, page 8

L:1/8

M:C

R:Strathspey

K:A

A|EA c/d/e c2 Ac|d>B d/c/B/A/ G(BBc)|EA c/d/e c2 Ac|d<Be>d cAA  :|

g|a>e a/g/f/e/ a2 ec|dB d/c/B/A/  G(BBg)|ae a/g/f/e/ a2 ec|dB d/c/B/A/ E(AAd)|

ceGe FdEc |dB d/c/B/A/ G(BBd)|cedf eagb |a/g/f/e/ ae cAA |]

                       

PERTHSHIRE YEOMANRY. AKA and see "Lady Herriot Hay's Reel." Scottish, Strathspey. Composed by John Bowie (1759‑1815), a musician and music‑seller of Perthshire who published it in 1801.

 

_______________________________________

HOME        ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

Please help maintain the viability of the Fiddler’s Companion on the Web by respecting the copyright.

For further information see Copyright and Permissions Policy or contact the author.