The Fiddler’s Companion

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

[COMMENT1] [COMMENT2] 

FOCH - FORG

[COMMENT3] 

[COMMENT4] 

Notation Note: The tunes below are recorded in what is called “abc notation.” They can easily be converted to standard musical notation via highlighting with your cursor starting at “X:1” through to the end of the abc’s, then “cutting-and-pasting” the highlighted notation into one of the many abc conversion programs available, or at concertina.net’s incredibly handy “ABC Convert-A-Matic” at

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html 

 

**Please note that the abc’s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc conversion programs. For example, I use abc2win and abcNavigator 2 with no problems whatsoever with direct cut-and-pasting. However, due to an anomaly of the html, pasting the abc’s into the concertina.net converter results in double-spacing. For concertina.net’s conversion program to work you must remove the spaces between all the lines of abc notation after pasting, so that they are single-spaced, with no intervening blank lines. This being done, the F/C abc’s will convert to standard notation nicely. Or, get a copy of abcNavigator 2 – its well worth it.   [AK]

 

 

 

FOCHABER'S RANT, THE. Scottish, Reel. G Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833), whose birthplace was Fochabers in its original site in Banffshire. Fochabers is a small town in the Moray parish of Bellie, six miles from the mouth of the river Spey. It was created a burgh of Barony in 1598 and originally stood somewhat closer to the walls of Gordon Castle, however, due to improvements to the castle the whole village was removed to its present site on the River Spey in 1776. As an exercise of planned conservation, many of the buildings have remained much as they were when built 200 years ago. The design of the village was the work of John Baxter, commissioned by the fourth Duke of Gordon, and features a rectangular street plan and a square whose south side is an example of Georgian architecture. A ferry was the only means of crossing the river (unless one cared to wade across) until the Fochabers Old Bridge was opened in 1804. This structure survived until 1829 when, during a massive flood surge, the pier on the west bank collapsed and wasn’t reopened for three years, and then with a wooden arch spanning the gap. This lasted for the next twenty-two years but the old bridge was eventually replaced by a three-rib arch fashioned from cast iron, the great Victorian architectural material. Marshall, employed as the Duke of Gordon’s Steward at Gordon Castle, would have been very familiar with Fochabers at the time of its latter 18th century removal and re-creation, and perhaps this tune is a celebration of the event. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 41.

X:1

T:Fochaber’s Rant, The

L:1/8

M:C|

S:Marshall1822 Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G2 bg afgd|g2 bgaf g2|g2 bgafge|=fdcf AFcA:|

(Bc/d/) (BG) ecdc|(Bc/d/) (BG) gB d2|(Bc/d/) BG ecdB|cA=FA fA c2|

(Bc/d/) (BG) ecdc|(Bc/d/) (BG)  gB d2|(Bc/d/) BG ecdB|cA=FA fA c2||

 

FOD MONA, AN. AKA and see "The Sod of Turf."

 

FOE, THE. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ew(i)e Wi' the Crooked Horn [1]," "Bob with the one Horn [2]," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "My Love is Far away", "The Merry Lasses," "The Kerry Lasses [1]," "The Red Blanket," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "Go see the Fun," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it," "Miss Huntley's."

 

FOGGY DEW [1], THE (Drucd An Ceo). Irish, March or Air (4/4 or 2/4 time). E Minor. Standard. ABB. Flood (1915) states the air is "certainly" as old as the year 1595, and was used by Denny Lane for his ballad "The Irish Maiden's Lament." See note for “The Enniskillen Dragoons” for brief note on the structure of this melody and partial list of others in this class.

***

The words below are credited to Father P. O’Neill, “as a tribute to the martyrs of 1916.”

***

´Twas down the glen one Eastern morn, to a city fair rode I

When Ireland´s lines of marching men in squadrons passed me by.

No pipes did hum, no battle drum did sound its loud tattoo.

But the Angelus bell o´er the Liffey´s swell, rang out in the foggy dew

***

Right proudly high over Dublin town, they hung out a flag of war.

‘Twas better to die ´neath an Irish sky than at Suvla or Sud El Bar;

And from the plains of Royal Meath, strong men came hurrying through,

While Brittanias´s huns, with their long range guns, sailed in from the foggy dew.

***

O, the night fell black and the rifles crack made "Perfidious Abion" reel

´Mid the leaden rail, seven tongues of flame did shine o´er the lines of steel

By each shining blade a prayer was said that to Ireland her sons be true,

and when morning broke still the war flag shook out its fold in the foggy dew

***

´Twas England bade our Wild Geese go that small nations might be free.

But their lonely graves are by Suvla´s waves, on the fringe of the Grey North sea

But had they died by Pearse´s side, or had fought with Cathal Brugha,

Their names we would keep where the fenians sleep, ´neath the shroud of the foggy dew.

***

But the bravest fell, and the requiem bell, rang mournfully and clear,

for those who died that Eastertide in the springtime of the year.

And the world did gaze, in deep amaze, at those fearless men, but true

who bore the fight that freedom´s light might shine through the foggy dew

***

Ah, back through the glen I rode again and my heart with grief was sore

For I parted then with valiant men whom I never shall se more

but to and fro in my dreams I go, and I´d kneel and pray for you,

for slavery fled, O glorious dead, when you fell in the foggy dew.

***

O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 185, pg. 33. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, vol. 1), 1999; pg. 3. RCA 62702, The Chieftains - “Long Black Veil.” Veteran VT111, Francis Shergold - "Greeny Up" (1988. Recorded from Bampton, England, morris dance musicians).

X:1

T:The Foggy Dew [1]

C:Irish Trad.

N:March Tempo

M:Cs  % 4/4 ?

K:Em

Bd || e2 dB | e2 dB | A2B2 | D2 EF |GB AG | E2D2 |E4‑|E2 Bd|

e2 dB | e2 dB | A2 B2 |D2 EF|GB AG | E2D2 |E4‑|E2 F2|

G2B2 | d2 cB | A2A2 |B2 GA|B2 gf | ed Bd | e4‑|e2 Bd|

e2 dB | e2 dB | A2 B2 |D2 EF|GB AG | E2E2 | E4||

X:2

T:The Foggy Dew [1]

C:Trad

R:Air

N:I´ve figured this out after listening to Chieftains The Long Black

N:Veil/Sinned O´Connor. It´s made for fingerstyle arpeggiostyle, with low

N:D droning here and there. Guitar tuned DADGAD

Z:Tomas Embréus tomas.embreus@swipnet.se

M:C

L:1/8

Q:40

K:Dm

Ac|:([D,d]A cA) ([D,d]A cA)|[D,G]{GAG}F GA CE [Gc]E|

[D,D]A GF [D,A]F E/2D/2C|1 [D,D]Adc [D,d]d Ac:|2 [D,D]A dc d2 DE||

[D,F]A AF [A,c]F BA| GF GA [D,d]d FA|

[D,A]A fe d{ded}c AG|Bd fd ce ge|[D,d]A cA [D,d]A cA|

[D,G]{GAG}F GA CE [Gc]E|F,F [Ac]F [E,2E2G2^B2] [D,D]C|[D,D]A dc d2|| Ac|

 


FOGGY DEW [2], THE (Drucd an Ceo). AKA and see "Sloan's Lamentation," "Granuaile." Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Major (Roche, O'Neill): A Flat Major (O'Sullivan Bunting). Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850): AAB (Roche). The tune converts easily to the minor key (see versions #1 & #3). Cazden (et al, 1982) mentions that the tune strain itself came to serve as a symbol of Irish nationalism and was used for a number of "songs of resistance." He finds the earliest printed version to be an 1828 setting of a poem by William Kennedy called "The Irish Emigrant," where it is called an "old Irish melody." Also related to Bunting's melody is a Catskill Mountain (New York) version collected by Norman Cazden (et al, 1982), while another melody printed in Bunting, "Sloan's Lament," is a variant. The Gaelic title for the tune is "Granuaile," for which there is an interesting story (see note for the tune), though it should be noted there are a great many tunes with the title "Granuaile" or its variants in existence. Source for notated version: the Irish collector Edward Bunting noted the melody from "J. McKnight, Esq., Belfast, 1839." O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 186, pg. 33. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 150, pgs. 207-208. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 3; No. 45, pg. 13. DREY 36191, Alan Stivell - “Olympia Concert.” Green Linnet SIF 1084, Eugene O'Donnell ‑ "The Foggy Dew" (1988). Green Linnet SIF 1101, Eugene O'Donnell ‑ "Playing with Fire: the Celtic Fiddle Connection" (1989).

X:1

T:Foggy Dew, The [2]

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 186

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

(EF) | G2 GA B2 gf | e2 dB A2 GA | BABG EGFA | G2G2G2 || ef | g2 gf e2 fg |

(ag)(fe) d2 (B^d) | e2 ef gfe^d | (e4 e2) EF | G2 GA B2 gf | e2 dB A2 GA |

(BA)(BG) (EG)(FA) | G2G2 G2 || 

 


FOGGY DEW [3], THE. Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Minor. Standard tuning. AB. A minor key rendition of the famous tune. Joyce learned this air as a child in Limerick, c. 1840's. He begs comparison with the melody "Air thaobh na carraige baine" in Petrie's Ancient Music of Ireland (p. 143). He prints the following lyrics, typical of many versions of the song:

***

When I was a bachelor airy and young,

I followed the bachelor's trade,

And all the harm that ever I done

Was courting a pretty maid.

I courted her for the long summer season,

And part of the winter too,

Till at length we were married‑‑myself and my darling,

All over the foggy dew.

***

Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 58, pgs. 31‑32.

X:1

T:The Foggy Dew [3]

R:song

H:  I learned this air when I was a child.  Compare it with "Air thaobh na

H:carraige b\'aine": Petrie, Ancient Music of Ireland, p. 143.

H:Bunting, in his 1840 volume, gives a different air with the same name.

B:Joyce, P. W.; "Old Irish Folk Music and Songs"

M:C

L:1/8

W:When I was a bachelor airy and young,

W:    I followed the bachelor's trade,

W:And all the harm that ever I done

W:    Was courting a pretty maid.

W:I courted her for the long summer season,

W:    And part of the winter too,

W:Till at length we were married‑‑myself and my darling,

W:    All over the foggy dew.

K:Bb

Bc|d dc B2 fd|c2 BG F2 GA|BGcB G2 G2|G6 Bc|

d2 dc B2 fd|c2 BG F2 GA|BGcB G2 G2|g6||GA|

B2 BG Bcd=e|f2 gf d2 cB|c2 Bc d=e f2|g6 gf|

e2 e2 d2 fd|c2 BG F2 GA|BGcB G2 G2|G6||

 

FOGGY DEW [4], THE. English, Air (4/4 time). F Major. Standard tuning. AABB. This air is from a MS collection of about 1825. Kidson remarks that the air is different from Bunting’s in his 1840 book Irish Music, although Margaret Dean-Smith (in "A Guide to English Folk Song Collections," pg. 67) maintains it “is of the same structure as that in (English collector Cecil) Sharpe's English Folk Carols (1911) but the melody is different from that usually associated with the English version of the song and nearer to that noted by Bunting." The tune goes to a bawdy song. Kidson (Old English Country Dances), 1890; pg. 24.

X:1

T:Foggy Dew, The [4]

M:C

L:1/8

S:Frank Kidson – Old English Country Dances (1890)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

F|F>GA>B c2f2|({e}d2) c>B ({B}A2) zc|({B}A2) GF E>FG>A|

F6 zF|F>GA>B c2f2|({e}d2) c>B ({B}A2) zc|({B}A2) GF E>FG>A|F6:|

|:z|c|c3 d _e3e|({_e}d2) cB ({B}A2) zF|f2f2 g_ecB|({B}A6) zc|

F>GA>c c2f2|({e}d2) c>B ({B}A2) zc|({B}A2) GF E>FG>A|F6:|

                       

FOGGY MORN [1], THE. Irish, Air (4/4 time). F Major. Standard tuning. AB. O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915; No. 79, pg. 47.

X;1

T:Foggy Morn [1]

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Air

S:O’Neill – O’Neill’s Irish Music (1915)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

F | FE FG/B/ c2 dB | AFEF D2 CD/E/ | FE FG/B/ c2 dB | AB GF F3G | FE FG/B/ c2 dB |

AFEF D2 CD/E/ | FE FG/B/ c2 dB | AB G>F F3 || A | cA cd/e/ f2 ef | dcde d2 cA |

dcde f2 ef/e/ | dcAc d3f | ecde f2 ed | cA GF D2 CD/E/ | FEFG A2 dB | AB GF F3 ||

 


FOGGY MORN [2], THE. Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Dorian. Standard tuning. One part. "On a calm foggy morning as I wandered alone" (Joyce). Source for notated version: "Paddy Conneely, the Galway piper," via Forde, via Joyce, mid‑1800's. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 453, pg. 254.

                       

FOGGY VALLEY. American, Polka. G Major ('A' and 'B' parts) & C Major ('C' part). Standard tuning. AABCC'. Source for notated version: Mary Trotchie [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 346. Columbia (78 RPM), Ellis Hall and Bill Addis.

                       

FOGHLAIDHE, AN. AKA and see "The Robber."

           

FOINS, LES. AKA and see “Danse des Foins.” The name of a dance with its own tune in Québec, perhaps dating to the 1700’s and which may have French origins, according to Marius Barbeau (Anne Lederman, “Fiddling”, Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada, 1992).

           


FOLDING DOWN THE SHEETS. AKA and see "Hanging Out the Sheets" (Ky. title), “Mackilmoyle Reel,” "Missouri Hornpipe,” "Republican Spirit,” “Winding Sheep." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA; southwestern Va., West Virginia, Kentucky. D Major. Standard or ADae tunings. AB (Silberberg): AABB. A somewhat-similar tune, perhaps a version of the melody, appears under the title "Republican Spirit" in George P. Knauff's Virginia Reels, volume I (1839), and elsewhere the tune appears in mid-nineteenth century Elias Howe volumes as "Missouri Hornpipe." Canadian fiddlers, such as Don Messer, have a version of the melody (most similar in the ‘B’ parts) calling it “The Mackilmoyle.” Most modern sources learned the tune from the playing of southwest Virginia fiddler Henry Reed (Glen Lyn, Va.), however, another set of “Folding Down the Sheets” was recorded in 1954 by Wyatt Insko from the playing of Floyd Burchett in Pike County, Kentucky. Bruce Greene says the title “Hanging Out the Sheets” was a local Barren County, Kentucky, name for the tune and that it may have been brought to Southern Kentucky by one John Gregory, originally from Virginia. Henry Reed told Alan Jabbour that he learned the tune from his mentor, Old Man Quince Dillion (formerly a fifer in the Civil War), and from John Dillion and an unidentified “Falls”, but that “all of ‘em played it” {see note for “Quince Dillon’s High ‘D’ Tune” for more on Dillon). Indeed, Reed was right, for as “Folding Down the Sheets” or one of the alternate titles, this tune was well-known to both Northern and Southern musicians at the time of the Civil War (Jim Taylor). See also the Kentucky variants “Winding Sheep” and “Jimmy Arthur’s,” and West Virginia fiddler Melvin Wine’s “Lady’s Waist Ribbon.” Sources for notated versions: Henry Reed (Glen Lyn, Va.) [Krassen]; Henry Reed via Alan Jabbour with the Hollow Rock String Band [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 110. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1983; pg. 91‑92. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 91. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 45. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 8. Cassette C-7625, Wilson Douglas - "Back Porch Symphony." Kicking Mule 209, Bob Carlin‑ "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo." Kanawha 311, Hollow Rock String Band‑ "Traditional Dance Tunes." June Appal 028, Wry Straw ‑ "From Earth to Heaven" (1978. Learned from Pete Vigour and Ellen Scherer).

X:1

T:Folding Down the Sheets

L:1/8

M:4/4

K:D

|:af|edcB ABc2 |dBAF D2EF|G4 F4|EDE2 A2:|

|:edef gfgf|Ace2 a4|A2a2A2g2|1edef e4:|2ede2d2|]

T:Folding Down the Sheets

L:1/8

M:4/4

S:Henry Reed, from a transcription by Alan Jabbour

K:D

(a/g/|f/)e/d/B/ e/d/c/A/ dF A/F/A/(d/|B/)G/B/(B/ A/)F/A/F/ A,2 D (a/g/|

f/)d/f/d/ e/c/e/c/ d[FA] A/F/A/d/|[D/B/]G/B/[G/B/] [D/A/]F/(A/F/) A,2 D2|

[A>e>](f g/f/)(g/f/) [A/e/]c/(e/f/4g/4) aa|c(e/c/ Bg (f/d/)(e/c/ d)d|

e(e/f/ g/f/)(g/f/) [A/e/]c/(e/f/4/g/4) aa|[c2e2] Bg f/d/e/c/ d2||

[A>e>]g|fd[Ae]c dF A/F/A/(d/|B/)G/B/(G/ D/F/)(A/F/) A,2 D2 e>(g|

f)d (e/c/)(e/c/) dF (A/F/)(A/d/)|(B/G/)(B/G/) (D/F/)(A/F/) A,2 D2|

e>(e/4f/4 g/f/)(g/f/) (e/c/)(e/f/) [A2a2]|[c2e2] [Bf]g f/d/(e/B/4c/4 d2)|

(e>f g/f/)[B/g/]f/ [A/e/]g/(e/f/) a2|[c2e2] Bg (f/d/)(e/c/ d)||

           

FOLICHON, LA.  French, Country Dance (2/4 time). A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. From the contradance book (tunes with dance instructions) of Robert Daubat (who styled himself Robert d’Aubat de Saint-Flour), born in Saint-Flour, Cantal, France, in 1714, dying in Gent, Belgium, in 1782. According to Belgian fiddler Luc De Cat, at the time of the publication of his collection (1757) Daubat was a dancing master in Gent and taught at several schools and theaters.  He also was the leader of a choir and was a violin player in a theater. Mr. De Cat identifies a list of subscribers of the original publication, numbering 132 individuals, of the higher level of society and the nobility, but also including musicians and dance-masters (including the ballet-master from the Italian opera in London). Many of the tunes are written with parts for various instruments, and include a numbered bass. Daubat (Cent Contredanses en Rond), 1757; No. 32.

X:1

T:Folichon, La

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Daubat – Cent Contredanses en Rond (1757), No. 32

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

Aeec | Aa a2 | AccA | B/A/G/F/ E2 | Aeec | Aa a2 | EddB | cB B2 :|

|: Be e/(f/g) | Be e2 | Be e/(f/g) | Be e2 | ea a/(b/c’) | ea {b}a2 | fdcB | A2A2 :|

                       

FOLIES d'ESPAGNE. AKA and see "Joy to Great Ceasar." AKA ‑ "Farinel's Ground," "The King's Health [1]."

                       

FOLLIES OF YOUTH,THE (bAois Na N-Oige). Irish, Double Jig (12/8 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Roche Collection, 1982, vol. 3; No. 96, pg. 29.

                       

FOLLING A ROLLING. AKA ‑ "The Folling." Irish, March (3/4 and 6/8 time). D Major ('A' and 'B' parts) & D Mixolydian ('C' and 'D' parts). Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. Roche Collection, 1982, vol. 2; No. 316, pg. 52.

                       

FOLLOW HER OVER THE BORDER. English, Jig (9/8 time). England, Northumberland. G Major (Bruce & Stokoe): F Major (Gow). Standard tuning. AABB. See also the related “Jaunting Car for Six.” Bruce & Stokoe  (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 179. Gow (Second Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels), 1788; pg. 14 (3rd edition).

X:1

T:Follow Her Over the Border

L:1/8

M:9/8

S:Bruce & Stokoe – Northumbrian Minstrelsy  (1882)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

e|d2B BGB BGB|d2B BGB d2g|d2B BGB BGB|c2A ABA c2:|

|:e|dBB gBB dBB|dBB gBB d2e|dBB gBB dBB|c2A ABA c2:|

X:2

T:Follow her over the border

M:9/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

B:Gow – 2nd Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels, pg. 14, 3rd ed.  (orig. 1788)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F
d|”tr”c2A AFA AFA|”tr”c2(A A)FA c2f|”tr”c2A AFA AFA|”tr”B2G GAG B2:|

|:d|”tr”c.A.A f.A.A c.A.A|cAA fAA “tr”c2d|cAA fAA cAA|”tr”B2G GAG B2:|

                       

FOLLOW ME. AKA and see "Follow Me Down to Carlow [1]."

                       

FOLLOW ME DOWN. See "Follow Me Down to Carlow."

                       

FOLLOW ME DOWN TO CARLOW [1] (Lean Me Sios Go Ceatair-Loc). AKA – “Follow Me Up (to Carlow).” AKA and see "An Ril Cam," "Bonnie Annie [3]," “The Crooked Reel,” “Dinny Delaney’s [2],” “Flip McGilder’s Reel,” "Miss Murphy [2]." Irish, Reel. A Dorian (O'Neill): B Minor (Taylor). Standard tuning. AB (O’Malley): AA'B (O'Neill): AABB (Taylor). O’Malley (Luke O’Malley’s Collection of Irish Music, vol. 1), 1976; No. 64, pg. 32. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1281, pg. 241. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 547, pg. 102. Taylor (Where’s the Crack?), 1989; pg. 15 (appears as "Follow Me"). Compass 7-4437-2, Teada – “Inne Amarach” (2006).

See also listing at:

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:Follow Me Down

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill –Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 547

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Minor

AGAG E^FGB | A^GAB cded | cBcA E^FGa |1 gedB cAdc :|2 gedB cA A2 ||

ec (3ccc ecgc | BGdG BGdG | ec (3ccc eg^fa | gedB cA A2 |

agea gedB | cBcG E^FGB | A^GAB cea^f | gedB cA A2 ||

X: 2
T:Follow Me Up
C:Traditional
D:Cran, The Crooked Stair
Z:Gordon Turnbull, Edinburgh
R:reel
M:C
L:1/8
Q:350
N:Posted to the woodenflute mailing list January 2002
K:ADor
ABAG EGA{B}G | A{BA}GAB d3 B | ABAG EGBd | ge{g}ed BA A2 :||
agea gedB | ABAG EG G2 | agea gedB | GBdB {c}BA A2 |
agea gedB | ABAG EG G2 | A{BA}GAB d2 de | ge{g}ed BAAG |]

 

FOLLOW ME DOWN TO CARLOW [2] ("Lean Me Sios Go Ceatair-Loc" or "Lean go Ceatharlach sios me"). AKA ‑ "Follow Me Down," “Follow Me Up (to Carlow).” AKA and see "An Ril Cam," “The Crooked Reel,” “Dinny Delaney’s [2],” "Miss Murphy [2]," "Bonnie Annie [3]." Irish, Single Jig, Slide, March (6/8 or 4/4 time) or Reel; New England, Jig or Polka. A Dorian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB (Breathnach, Joyce): AAB (Darley & McCall, Mitchell, O'Neill, Tubridy): AABBC (Moylan). Breathnach (1977) states the tune is a 6/8 version of a Scottish reel by Donald Dow (Glen Collection, pg. 23 {4th tune}, and Gow's Complete Repository, vol. 1, pg. 22 {3rd tune}). Darley & McCall state that the air is called "Follow Me Up to Carlow" and that there is a tradition that this air was the Clan March of the O'Byrne family. Its first public airing was supposedly when it was played by the Irish war‑pipers of Feagh MacHugh (Fiach Mc Hugh O’ Byrne) at the fight of Glenmalure (1580) when he attacked the English of the Pale (the environs surrounding Dublin), defended by the troops of Lord Deputy Grey. However, there are “grave doubts” about whether the tune is as old as the 16th century. Sources for notated versions: Mrs. Anastasia Corkery (Irish‑American from Co. Cork and Cambridge, Mass., 1930's) [Bayard]: "...copied from (a) very old well‑written manuscript lent to me in 1873 by Mr. J. O'Sullivan, of Bruff, Co. Limerick" [Joyce]; "received from the Rev. Father Gaynor, C.M., Cork" [Darley & McCall]; piper Felix Doran, 1969 (Co. Kilmany, Ireland) [Breathnach]; west Kerry fiddler Padraig O’Keeffe via accordion player Johnny O’Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; Appendix No. 35, p. 586. Breathnach (CRÉ I), 1963; No. 107. Breathnach (CRÉ II), 1976; No. 84, p. 45. Darley & McCall (The Feis Ceóil Collection of Irish Airs), 1914; No. 65, pg. 29.  Henebry, 1928; No. 75, p. 255. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 243, pp. 117‑118. Miller & Perron (101 Polkas), 1978; No. 10. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 129, p. 103 (appears as “Follow Me Up to Carlow”). Moylan (Johnny O’Leary), 1994; No. 325, p. 185 (slide version). O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 1282, p. 241. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907; No. 988, p. 170. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; p. 5.

X:1

T:Follow Me Down to Carlow

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Dorian

ABA A2G|E2F G2B|ABA A2B|c2d e2d|c2A B2G|E2F G2B|ABA B2G|A3A3||

e2g g3|e2a a3|BcB B2A|G2A B3|e2g g3|e2a a3|BcB B2G|A3A3|e2g g3|e2a a3|

BcB B2A|G2A B2d|e2f g2e|a2f ged|BcB B2G|A3A3||

X:2

T:Follow Me Down to Carlow

M:C

L:1/8

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 988

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Minor

(3ABA A>G E>^F G2|(3ABA A>B c>de>d|c>bc>G E>^FG>B|(3ABc B>G A2A2:|

||e>aa>g e>^f g2|(3BcB B>A G>A (3Bcd|e>aa>g e>^f g2|(3BcB B>B A2 A2|

e>aa>g e>^f g2|(3BcB B>A G>A (3Bcd|e>g^f>a g>ag>e|d>BG>B g>dB>G||

 

FOLLOW ME DOWN TO CARLOW [3]. AKA and see “Tom Ward’s Downfall.” Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. The title “Follow Me Down to Carlow”, usually applied to other melodies, was the title Mike Rafferty’s father, Barrel Rafferty, had for the tune. It is properly called “Tow Ward’s Downfall” or “The Mourne Mountains [1].” Source for notated version: New Jersey flute player Mike Rafferty, born in Ballinakill, Co. Galway, in 1926 [Harker]. Harker (300 Tunes from Mike Rafferty), 2005; No. 68, pg. 22. Larraga LR090098, Mike and Mary Rafferty – “The Old Fireside Music” (1998).

 

FOLLOW ME DOWN TO GALWAY. Irish, Reel. A Minor. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. The title comes from flute player Mike Rafferty, who had the tune from his father. He had no name for it, so gave it the title himself, and paired it with “Follow Me Down to Carlow.” Source for notated version: Barrel Rafferty, via his son, New Jersey flute player Mike Rafferty, born in Ballinakill, Co. Galway, in 1926 [Harker]. Harker (300 Tunes from Mike Rafferty), 2005; No. 65, pg. 21. Larraga LR09098, Mike and Mary Rafferty – “Old Fireside Music” (1998).

X:1

T:Follow Me Down to Galway

D:Mike & Mary Rafferty, The Old Fireside Music (1998)

Z:Nigel Gatherer

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:Am

A2 BG A2 Bd|e2 dg eAAD|G2 GD G2 AB|cABA GEDE|A2 BG A2 Bd|egdg eaae|

gedB c2 (3Bcd|egdB BA A2::abae abae|gaba gede|g2 gd g2 (Bcd|

gaba ge d2|abae abae|gaba gede|gedB c2 (3Bcd|egdB BA A2:|]

                       

FOLLOW ME DOWN TO LIMERICK. AKA and see “Will You Come Down to Limerick?” Irish, Slip Jig. G Mixolydian/Major. Standard tuning. AA’B CC’. Source for notated version: fiddler Simon Doherty (County Donegal) [Feldman& O’Doherty]. Feldman & O’Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 99. Outlet SOLP 1010, Na Fili – “Farewell to Connacht” (197?).

                       

FOLLOW ME, HARRY. American, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Howe (1000 Jigs and Reels), c. 1867; pg. 71.

X:1

T:Follow Me, Harry

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Howe – 1000 Jigs and Reels (c. 1867)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

GBdB GBdB | cBAc B2A2 | G3G ABcA | BcdB c2A2 | GBdB GBdB |

cBAc B2A2 | G3G ABcA | BdAF G3z || g2f2d2B2 | cBAc B2A2 |

G3G ABcA | BcdB c2A2 | g2e2d2B2 | cBAc B2A2 | G3G ABcA | BdAF G3z ||

 

FOLLOW ME TO CARLOW. AKA and see "The Bundle of Straw," "The Tralee Lasses," "Jim Kennedy's Favourite," "Cois an Ghiorria," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "The Hare's Foot," "The Silvermines [1]."

                       

FOLLOW ME UP. AKA and see “Follow Me Down to Carlow [1].” Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AAB.
X: 1
T:Follow Me Up
C:Traditional
D:Cran, The Crooked Stair
Z:Gordon Turnbull, Edinburgh
R:reel
M:C
L:1/8
Q:350
N:Posted to the woodenflute mailing list January 2002
K:ADor
ABAG EGA{B}G | A{BA}GAB d3 B | ABAG EGBd | ge{g}ed BA A2 :||
agea gedB | ABAG EG G2 | agea gedB | GBdB {c}BA A2 |
agea gedB | ABAG EG G2 | A{BA}GAB d2 de | ge{g}ed BAAG |]

                       

FOLLOW ME UP TO CARLOW. AKA and see "The Sweets of May." AKA and see "Follow Me Down to Carlow [2]."

                       

FOLLOW YOUR LOVER. AKA – “Follow Your Lovers,” “Follow My Lover.” AKA and see "The Triumph [1]."

                       

FOLLOW YOUR LOVERS. AKA and see “Step and Fetch Her [3].” English, Country Dance Tune (4/4 & 6/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. Originally published by Playford.

X:1

T:Follow Your Lovers

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:G

G2 A B2 B2|cdcA B2 B2 cdcA B2 B2| c2 c2 B2 B2|A2 GA B2 B2 cdcA B2 B2|\

M:6/4

cdcA B2 B2 A2 FA\ M:4/4 G2 B2 G4||\

A3 A B2 B2 |A2 AA B2 B2 | A3 A B2 c| dcBA G4| A3 c B2 B2|A3 A B2 c2| dcB A G4||\

B2 d2 d2 c2|ABAB c2 B2|GABc d2 g2|f6 d2|B2 d2 d2 c2|ABAB c2 B2|GABc d2 g 2|\

f2 f2 g4||

 

FONAB HOUSE.  Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Neil Gow, Jr. (c. 1795-1823), son of Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831) and the grandson of family scion Niel Gow (1727-1807). Like several of the 6/8 tunes in the later Gow collections, this tune was directed to be played “Slowly”; presumably this means at a moderate tempo (or, not ‘brisk’), and not like a slow air. The moderate tempo is effective on a tune such as this, which winds in and out of major and mixolydian modes in the second part. The younger Neil briefly joined his father’s music publishing firm, and was showing great promise as a talented performer and composer before his untimely death. His father collected and published his son’s compositions in a Collection of Slow Airs, Strathspeys and Reels, being the Posthumous Compositions of the late Neil Gow, Junior, dedicated to the Right Honourable, the Earl of Dalhousie, by his much obliged servant, Nathaniel Gow (Edinburgh, 1849). Neil Gow Jr.’s first name is usually spelt differently that his grandfather’s, however, in Nathaniel’s Sixth Collection (1822) the attribution appears as “Niel Gow Junr.”

***

Fonab House, north central Perthshire, was a country house opposite Pitlochry (a residence) on the south side of the river Tummel, and the residence (at the beginning of the 19th century) of Mr. MacGregor, “a pleasant and healthy situation.” The name Fonab is derived from Gaelic meaning Abbot’s land, as the area came into the possession of the monks of Coupar Angus Abbey in the 12th century. Today the manor is known as Port-na-Craig House. Gow (Sixth Collection of Strathspey Reels), 1822; pgs. 24-25. Johnson (A Twenty Year Anniversary Collection), 2003; pg. 9.

X:1

T:Fonab House

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Slow Air

S:Neil Gow Jr. – Collection of Slow Airs, Strathspeys and Reels, etc.  (1849)

K:D

A|(F/G/)AA Afe|dAB AFd|AFD DAF|GEE [C2E2]G|(F/G/)AA Afe|

dAB AFd|Aaf ged|{d}”tr”c>Bc d2:||a|fda {g}f>ed|Adc d2=f|e=cg {=f}e>dc|

G=cB c2a|fda {g}f>ed|Adc ~d2e/f/|{f}e>dc dAB|AFd D2a|fda f>ed|

Adc d2=f|e=cg {=f}e>dc|G=cB c2e|dDE FGA|Bcd efg|afd ged|{d}”tr”c>Bc d2||

 

FONCASTELLE HOUSE. Scottish, Reel. C Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Malcolm MacDonald, appearing in his first collection, dedicated to Mrs. Baird of Newbyth. MacDonald (A Collection of Strathspey Reels, vol. 1); pg. 11.

X:1

T:Foncastelle House

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:MacDonald – Collection of Strathspey Reels

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

F | ECEG cGAF | FcEc dDDF | ECEG cGAF | defd ec c :|

e/f/ | gcec Gcec | GcEc dDD(e/f/) | gcec Gcec | defd ecce/f/ |

gcec Gcec | GcEc dDDF | ECEG cGAF | defd ec cd ||

                       

FONCEY’S TUNE. Canadian, Two-Step. Canada, Prince Edward Island. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’B. Perlman (1996) believes the tune was converted from a popular song. Source for notated version: Johnny Joe and Foncey Chaisson (b. 1918 & 1929, North-East Prince County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 163.

                       

FOND CHLOE. Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Flat Mixolydian. Standard tuning. ABB. Petrie opines: “A queer name for an Irish air.” Source for notated version: “From Mr. R.A. Fitzgerald” [Stanford/Petrie]. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 720, pg. 181.

X:1

T:Fond Chloe

M:3/4
L:1/8

R:Air

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 720

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

_d>c | B>A GE _dc | B>A GE E>F | G2 AG F>E | E4 _d>c | B>A GE _d>c |

B>A GE E>F | G2 {B}A>G F>E | E4 |: E>F | G>F GA B>c | _d2 B2 Bc/=d/ |

e>d eg f>e | e>d B2 _dc | B>A GE _d>c | B>A GE E>F | G2 AG F>E | E4 :|

                       

FOND d' CULOTTE TWO-STEP (Seat of the Pants Two-Step). Cajun, Two-Step. USA, Louisiana. A Major. Standard tuning. AAAAAAABBAAAAAA. "An old instrumental," notes Raymond Francois (1990). Source for notated version: Reggie Matte, Sidney Brown (La.) [Francois]. Francois (Yé Yaille, Chère!), 1990; pg. 139. Swallow Records SW-LP6001, Sidney Brown.

                       

FOND FAREWELL, A.  Scottish, Air (whole time). B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Dr. John Turner; musician, teacher, performer and director of the Jink and Diddle School of Scottish Fiddling, held yearly in Valle Crucis, North Carolina. Johnson (A Twenty Year Anniversary Collection), 2003; pg. 3. Turner (Fiddletree Collection), 1978.

 

FOND OF THE LADIES. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The first part is the same as “Pat Beirne’s Favourite,” “Sweet Biddy Daly,” “Irishman’s Heart to the Ladies” family of tunes, though the second part is different (it is the first part of the “Kesh Jig [1]”). O’Neill (1922) remarks: “Following the example of Dr. Petrie and Dr. Joyce, whose collections abound in variants, some of which differ but slightly from others in their pages; the editor has continued the practice, rather than risk the loss of a worthy strain. Of that class is ‘Fond of the Ladies’, the opening bars of which remind us of ‘Sweet Biddy Daly’, or ‘The Irishman's Heart to the Ladies’ previously printed.” O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 154.

X:1

T:Fond of the Ladies

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Capt. F. O'Neill

Z:Paul Kinder

K:G

e|dBG AGE|GED D2 E|G2 G A2 A|BAA Age|

dBG AGE|GED D2 E|G2 G A2 A|BGG G2:|

|:D|G2 G GAB|A2 A ABd|e>ee efg|dBG AGE|

GAG GAB|ABA ABd|ede gdB|AGE G2:||

 

FONN ACHILL. See "Achill Air."


 

FONN AIR DAIN FEINNE. AKA and see "Fingalian Air."

 

FONN AN ABHRANAIDH. AKA and see "The Chanter's Tune."

 

FONN AN CEOLRAIDE. AKA and see "The Chanter's Tune."

 

FONN CILLE CAMNIGH. AKA and see "Kilkenny Tune."

 

FONN GHATHAICHTE OISEIN. AKA and see "An Ossianic Air."

 

FONN UISGEUL NO DAN. AKA and see "Romance or Song Air."

 

FONTAINE’S FERRY. Old-Time. A Kentucky piece from Darley Fulks.

 

FOOL'S JIG. English, Morris Dance Tune (3/2 time). A Major. Standard. AB. The only stick dance from the village of Bampton, Oxfordshire, in England's Cotswolds; the stick was passed between the legs from side to side. John Kirkpatrick (1976) notes that character of the fool, a common morris representation, was supposed to be played by the best dancer and it was usual for him to do a solo. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pg. 57. Topic TSCD458, John Kirkpatrick - “Plain Capers” (1976/1992).

X:1

T:The Fool's Jig

S:trad arr Pete Stewart
M:4/4

L:1/8

K:G
GFGE DEDB | AGFE D2c2 | BcdB cGFG | AGFE DcBA |

GFGE DFGB | AGFE D2c2 | BcdB cAGF | G2B2 G4:||
||:  BcdB GBdB | cBAB c2AB | cBAG FGAB | AGFE DcBA |

GFGE DEDB | AGFE D2c2 | BcdB EcAF | G2B2 G4 :||

 

FOOSTRA, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. In the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore widely known.

 

FOOT IT FEATHY. Scottish, Reel. A Major/Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AAB. A ‘double-tonic’ melody. Source for notated version: Miss L. Duff Stuart [MacDonald]. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1884; pg. 30.

X:1

T:Foot it Feathy

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Skye Collection  (1887)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

g|a2 AB cdef|=g2 d=c BGG>g|a2 AB cdef|gfed cAA>e:|

cAeA aAef|=g2 d=c BGGB|cAeA aAef|gfed cAAe|

cAeA aAef|=g2 d=c BGGB|AcBd ceef|eagb aA A2||

 

FOOT LOOSE AND FANCY FREE. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.

 

FOOT OF THE MOUNTAIN, THE (Cos an t-Sleibe). Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. O’Neill (Irish Folk Music) says the tune was previously “unpublished and new to us.” Source for notated version: John Carey, a native of Limerick [O’Neill]. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1986; No. 331, pg. 69.

X:1

T:Foot of the Mountain

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 331

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G/>A/ | B3 BAG | Add dcA | B3 BAG | FAA AFD | B3 BAG | Add dcA |

DGG cAF|AGG G2 :: D | DGG FDD | DGG FDD | DGG AGF |

cAG AFD | DGG FDD | DGG FDD | DGG cAF | AGG G2 :|

 

FOOT THAT FALTERED WALTZ, THE. Old‑Time, Waltz. USA, Nebraska. E Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, vol. 1), 1973; pg. 186.

 

FOOTHILLS BREAKDOWN. Canadian. Point Records P‑229, Red Crawford ‑ "Canadian Jigs and Reels."

           

FOOTING THE TURF. Irish, Jig. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by fiddler and pianist Josephine Keegan (b. 1935), of Mullaghbawn, south County Armagh. Keegan (The Keegan Tunes), 2002; pg. 57.

                       

FOOTPRINTS. AKA and see "Put Your Little Foot Right Here." Old‑Time, Waltz. D Major. Standard tuning. One part. The tune has been called a waltz version of "Haste to the Wedding." It does not appear to resemble the usual tune of the alternate title. Thomas and Leeder (The Singin’ Gatherin’), 1939; p. 63.

 

FOOTPRINTS IN THE SNOW. Bluegrass, Song. “Footprints in the Snow” was popularized by mandolin player Bill Monroe and band; it has been a bluegrass standard for years. Christopher C. King, in his notes to “Old-Time Music in West Virginia, vol. 2” (County CD 3519), reports that the first recording of  “Footprints in the Snow” was under the title “Little Foot Prints,” by the West Virginia Ramblers in June, 1931 (the Ramblers were guitarist Roy Harvey, fiddler Jess Johnson, fiddler Bernice Coleman, and banjo player and singer Ernest Branch). Cliff Carlisle covered the song in 1939, and finally Bill Monroe recorded it with the altered title “Footprints in the Snow.” The tune is similar, especially in the beginning, to “Little Stream of Whiskey.” Columbia CS 1065, Bill Monroe and his Bluegrass Boys – “16 All-Time Greatest Hits” (197?). Folkways FA 2355, Clint Howard & Fred Price – “Old-Time Music at Clarence Ashley’s” (1961). Old Homestead OHCS 141, Bernice Coleman & the West Virginia Ramblers – “West Virginia Hills: Early Recordings from West Virginia” (1982. Reissue).  Old Homestead OHCS 314, “Bradley Kincaid, Vol. 1” (1984. Reissue). Vanguard 107/8, Doc Watson, Clint Howard & Fred Price – “Old Timey Concert” (1987).

X:1

T:Footprints in the Snow

M:4/4

L:1/16

S:Arr. Joey McKenzie (as played at the 1997 "national" fiddle contest in

Weiser, Idaho)

Z:Trans. Tony Ludiker

Z:The B part (begins on line 5) is bowed du u du u du u du u.

Z:The last note of line 5 should slur into the first note of line 6.

Z:Each (e_e=e) is fingered with the fourth finger, followed by an open

"E" note.

K:E

([G2B2]|[EB])B,EF G([Be][c2e2]) ([ce][e3e3]) ([fe][g2e2]e)|=gfef gfe(=dc^B)cf ecAc|

BFBc dfgd fB(=d^d) B2bg|f(B=d^d) B([GB][FB][GB]) ([E4B4][EB])([EB][=GB][^GB])|

[EB]B,EF G([Be][c2e2]) ([ce][e3e3]) ([fe][g2e2]e)|=gfef gfe(=d c^B)cf ecAc|

BFBc dfgd fB(=d^d) B2bg|f(B=d^d) B([GB][FB][GB])([E4B4][EB])([FB][E2B2])||

[GB][GB] z[GB] [GB][GB] z[GB] [Ac][Ac] z[Ac] [GB][GB]

z[GB]|(3([GB][AB][GB][F2B2] [F2B2])([FB][GB] [F6B6])=d2|

dfzd fz a‑g fB=d^d BBcB|eB=dc B([GB][FB][GB]) [EB]z(3[B,E][B,E][B,E][C2E2]^D2|

([=DA][E3B3])([FB][G3B3])([ce][e3e3])([fe][g2e2]e)|=gfef gfe(=d c^B)cfecAc|

BFBc dfgd fB(=d^d) B2bg|f(B=d^d) B([GB][FB][GB]) [E6B6]e‑f||

gbge fecd edf(e g2)ec|=defa gfe(d |c^B)cf ecAc|

BFBc dfgd fB(=d^d) B2bg|f(B=d^d) B([GB][FB][GB]) ([E4B4][EB])(e_e=e)|

e(e_e=e) e(e_e=e) edf(e g2)ec|=defa gfe(d  c^B)cf ecAc|

BFBc dfgd fB(=d^d) B2bg|f(B=d^d) B([GB][FB][GB])([E4B4][EB])([FB][E2B2])||

[GB][GB] z[GB] [GB][GB] z[GB] [Ac][Ac] z[Ac] [GB][GB]

z[GB]|(3([GB][AB][GB][F2B2] [F2B2])([FB][GB] [F6B6])fg|

agag ffgf af=d^d BBcB|eB=dc B([GB][FB][GB]) [EB]z(3[B,E][B,E][B,E][C2E2]^D2|

([=DA][E3B3])([FB][G3B3])([ce][e3e3])([fe][g2e2]e)|=gfef gfe(=d c^B)cfecAc|

BFBc dfgd fB(=d^d) B2bg|f(B=d^d) B([GB][FB][GB]) [E6B6]|

 

FOOTY. AKA and see “Footy Agyen the Wa’,” "Peacock's Fancy [1]."

 

FOOTY AGYEN THE WA’. AKA and see “Peacock’s Fancy [1].” English, Country Dance Tune (6/8 time). E Minor. Standard tuning. AB. Originally published by Playford. Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1909/1994; pg. 61.

X:1

T:Footy Agyen The Wa'

L:1/8

M:6/8

K:G

(f|g2 e f2 d|e2 d B2) (f|g2e f2 d|B3) B2 (f|g2 e f2 d|e2 f g2) (e|dBG A2 B|E3) E 2:|

(F | G2A B2d | c2A B2) (A | G2A B2d | e3) e2f | (g2e f2d | e2f g2) (e | dBG A2B | E3) E2 ||

 


FOR A' THAT AND A' THAT. AKA and see “Black but Comely,” “Black laddie my darling,” “An Gille Dubh Mo Laochan,” "Lady Mackintosh('s Reel) [1]," “Mo Laochan,” “Strawberry Blossom [2],” "There's Nae Luck Aboot the Hoose (There’s Nae Luck Ava) [1]." Scottish, English; Reel. England, Northumberland. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB (Gow, Vickers): AABB' (Kerr). Made famous by poet Robert Burns ("A Man's a Man for a' that"), although he adapted the words and tune of an existing older air. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 561 ("There's Nae Luck...") and 523 ("Lady Mackintosh"). Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 2; No. 145, pg. 17. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 3; No. 485.

X:1

T:For a’ that and a’ that

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 2, No. 145  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A|d>ed>A (B<d)(e>f)|d>ef>d B2 (B>A)|d>ed>A (B<d)(e>g)|f>ed>B A2A:|

|:g|f>ga>f g<ee>g|f>ga>A B2 (G>g)|1 f>ga>f g>fe>g|f>ed>B A2A:|2 f>ga>f b/a/g/f/ e<g|f>ed>B A2A||

X:2

T:For aw that and aw that

M:C

L:1/8

S:William Vickers’ music manuscripts, pg. 147  (1770)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

f|d/d/d dA Bdeg|fdad ~B3d|d/d/d dABdeg|fedB A2:|

|:f|gbag geeg|fdad ~B2 B[df]|abaf geeg|fedB A2:|

 

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 138, pg. 72.

X:1

T: For Better or For Worse

C: © B. Black

Q: 350

R: reel

M: 4/4

L: 1/8

K: D

D | FAdA B2 Bc | dBAF GFED | FAdA B2 Bc | dfaf gBdB |

FAdA Bcde | faba geeg | fd (3ded cAAc | dBAF ED D :|

A | (3cBA eA (3cBA eA | fddc dAFA | (3cBA eA (3cBA eA |faaf a3 e|

cAeA cAeA | fddc dAFD | GB (3BAB Acec | dBAF ED D :|

                       

FOR BOOTS. Old-Time, Waltz. G Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Gene Silberberg in honor of his friend Richard C. “Boots” Houlahan. Houlahan was a jazz trumpet player who came by his name because a neighborhood dog had died just before he was born. His older sister thought he was the dog’s reincarnation, and applied the same name. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 46.

                       

FOR FREEDOM AND FOR ERIN (Le Saoirse's Le Eirinn). Irish, Air (6/8 time, "boldly"). G Minor. Standard tuning. AB. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 168, pg. 29.

X:1

T:For Freedom and For Erin

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Boldly”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 168

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Gmin

D | G2B A2G | F2=E D2E | F2F F2A | c3 A2A | G2B A2G |

F2=E D2d | d2c B2A | G3 G2 || A | B2B B2G | c2c c2A |

B2B B2G | c3 A2A | B2B B2G | c2c c2 =B/c/ \ d2 c _B2A | G3 d2 ||

 

FOR I’D RATHER GO. Irish, Air (3/4 time). Ireland, County Wexford. E Flat Major. Standard tuning. AB. Source for notated version: “From Mr. R.A. Fitzgerald” [Stanford/Petrie]. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 781, pg. 195.

X:1

T:For I’d rather go

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”County of Wexford”

N:”Andante”

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 781

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

Bed | (e2f)e de/c/ | B>GE F G/A/B | c>A FD EE | E3 Bed | (e2f)e de/c/ |

B>GE F G/A/B | c>A FD EE | E3 || F/G/ AG | F>GA B c/d/e | f>d BB c/d/e |

(f2g) e dc | B3 c/d/ ed | e2f e de/c/ | B>G EF G/A/B | c>A FD EE | E3 ||

 

FOR IRELAND I WON'T SAY HER NAME [1] (“Ar Eirinn ní Neosfainn Ce Hi” or “Air Éire ní Neó’sainn Cia h-Í). AKA ‑ "For Ireland I'd Not Tell/Say Her Name." AKA and see "'Ar Eirinn ni 'Neosfainn Ce Hi." "I Am a Disconsolate Rake," “Nancy Pride of the West,” "The River Lee," "Storeen Machree,” “Tweedside." Irish, Slow Air (6/8 or 3/4 time). D Major (Boys of the Lough, Miller & Perron): G Major (Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham, Ó Canainn, O’Neill). Standard tuning. One part (Boys/Lough, Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham, Ó Canainn): AB (Miller & Perron, O’Neill). The song attached to this slow air, according the Boys of the Lough, relates the tale of a beautiful maiden who appeared for a short time to a Gaelic poet, resisted his advances and then disappeared forever, leaving him heartbroken. Another version has it that the protagonist falls secretly in love with a maid, although he is too poor to support her and too shy to propose. He goes abroad to seek his fortune, and once made and emboldened he returns home to claim his beloved, only to discover she has married his brother. Brokenheared, he composes this song, though for obvious reasons he refuses to reveal the name of his beloved. The Boys of the Lough note some similarity between this tune and the English/Scottish border tune known as 'Tweedside.' "...It is often called 'Binn lisin aerach a Bhrogha’ (The melodious little lis of Bruff, Co. Limerick) from a song about that place" (Joyce). The melody was published by both Petrie and Joyce (pg. 221, appears as "Nancy the Pride of the West") as the vehicle for songs, and the music appears in Poets and Poetry of Munster (1849). Joyce also later included it in his Irish Music and Song.” Words to the song begin:

***

Aréir is mé téarnamh um’ neoin,

Ar an dtaobh thall den teóra ‘na mbím,

Do théarnaig an spéir-bhean im’ chómhair

D’fhág taomanach breóite lag sinn.

Do ghéilleas dá méin is dá cló,

Dá béal tanaí beó mhilis binn,

Do léimeas fé dhéin dul ‘na cómhair,

Is ar Éirinn ní n-eósainn cé h-í.

***

Last night as I strolled abroad

On the far side of my farm

I was approached by a comely maiden

Who left me distraught and weak.

I was captivated by her demeanour and shapeliness

By her sensitive and delicate mouth,

I hastened to approach her

But for Ireland I’d not tell her name.     (Mary O’Hara, A Song for Ireland).

***

Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 24. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stóir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne/The Set Dance Music of West Kerry), No. 89, pg. 51. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 2nd Edition, 2006; pg. 137. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 57, pg. 51 (appears as “Ar Eirinn”). O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 87, pg. 15. North Star NS0031, "Dance Across the Sea: Dances and Airs from the Celtic Highlands" (1990). Transatlantic TRA 296, Boys of the Lough, "Recorded Live."

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:For Ireland I Won’t Say Her Name

L:1/8

M:3/4

K:G Major

GA | B2 D2 D2 | E2 c2 BA | B4 GA | B2 D2 D2 | E2 G2 B2 | B4 GA |

B2 D2 D2 | E2 c2 BA | B4 A2 | G2 E2 D2 | E2 G3 A | G4 || Bc |

d2 B2 A2 | G2 B2 d2 | e4 ge | d2 B2 A2 | G2 A2 B2 | A4 GA |

B2 D2 D2 | E2 c2 BA | B4 A2 | G2 E2 D2 | E2 G3 A | G4 |]

 

FOR IRELAND I WON'T SAY HER NAME [2] (Air Éire ní Neó’sainn Cia h-Í). Irish, Air (3/4 time, “With feeling”). E Minor. Standard tuning. AB. Source for notated version: a manuscript collection dated 1861 of Rev. James Goodman, an Anglican cleric who collected primarily in County Cork [Shields]. Shields (Tunes of the Munster Pipers), 1998; No. 11, pg. 8.

                                   

FOR (ALL) IRELAND I WOULD NOT TELL WHO SHE IS. See “For Ireland, I Won’t Tell Her Name.”

                                   

FOR LAKE/LACK OF GOLD SHE'S LEFT ME. Scottish, Air or Jig. The melody appears twice (in air and jig form) in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth, 1768.

                                   

FOR LLANOVER REEL. AKA and see "Mae Nhw'n D'wedyd."

                                   

FOR MY BREAKFAST YOU MUST GET A BIRD WITHOUT A BONE [1]. Irish, Air (2/4 time). Ireland, County Wexford. F Major. Standard tuning. One part. Source for notated version: “Mr. R.A.E.” [Stanford/Petrie]. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 777, pg. 194.

X:1

T:For my breakfast you must get a bird without a bone [1]

M:2/4

L:1/8

N:”Andante”

N:”Wexford”

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 777

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

c | A>B cc | d>c AG | FF GG | A3 c | cf ed | dc cc | cf ed | c3 d/e/ | fA Bc |

d>c AG | FF GG | A3c | d>c Ac | d>e fB | AA G>F | F3 ||

 

FOR MY BREAKFAST YOU MUST GET A BIRD WITHOUT A BONE [2]. Irish, Air (2/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard tuning. One part. Source for notated version: “From Mr. Fitzgerald” [Stanford/Petrie]. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 778, pg. 194.

X:1

T:For my breakfast you must get a bird without a bone [2]

M:2/4

L:1/8

N:”Andante”

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 778

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

G/A/ | B>A GB | e/>f/g/>e/ fB/>G/ | AG F>F | E3B | eB ef/g/ |

a/f/ g/e/ cB/G/ | AB cf | B3B | eB ef/g/ | a/f/ g/e/ cB/G/ | AB cf |

B3 G/A/ | B>A GB | e/>f/ g/e/ fB/G/ | AG F>F | E3 ||

                       

FOR MY MOTHER DEAR. Canadian, Waltz. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB. Composed by the late Inverness, Cape Breton, fiddler and composer Jerry Holland (1955-2009), in memory of his mother. Cranford (Jerry Holland: The Second Collection), 2000; No. 322, pg. 116. Odyssey ORCS 1051, Jerry Holland – “Fiddler’s Choice” (1999).

                       

FOR OLD LANG GINE MY JOE. Scottish. The tune appears in Henry Playford's 1700 collection of Scottish dance tunes. The title is probably a mis-hearing; 'gine' should be 'syne.'

           

FOR THE LACK OF GOLD (She Left Me). Scotch, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. O’Farrell lists the tune as Scotch. McGibbon (Scots Tunes, book III), 1762; pgs. 90-91. O’Farrell (Pocket Companion, vol. 1); c. 1805; pg. 75.

X:1

T:For the Lack of Gold

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

S:O’Farrell – Pocket Companion, vol. 1 (c. 1805)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

FE | D3F ABdA | B2 e>f e2 dB | d2a2 fabd | f2 a>b a3d | g>abg f>gaf | gf”tr”ed e2 de/f/ |

D3F A>BdA | B2 d>ed2 :: de | fdeB dABF | E2 e>f e2 fa | bafb adbd | f2 a?b a2d2 |

g>abg fgaf | gfed “tr”e2 de/f/ | D2 DF ABdA | B2 d>e d2 :|

X:2

T:For the lack of Gold she left me

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Lively”

S:McGibbon – Scots Tunes, book III, pgs. 90-91  (1762)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

(F>E) | D3F A>BdA | B2 (e>f) “tr”e2 (d>B) | d2a2 (fa)(bd) | f2 (a>b) “tr”a2d2 |

(g>ab)g (f>ga)f | (gf)”tr”(ed) e2 (d/e/f) | D3F (A>BdA | B2 (d>e) d2 :|

|: d>e | fdeB dABF | E2 (e>f) e2 (fa) | bafb adbd | f2 (a>b) a2d2 | g>abg f>gaf |

(gf)(ed) “tr”e2 (d/e/f) | D3F ABdA | B2 (d>e)d2 :: “tr”(F>E) | D3F (AB/c d/c/d/A/) |

B2 (e>f) e2 (dB) | (d/e/f/g/ a)d (f/d/c/d/) (b/d/c/d/) | f2 (a>b) a3f | (g/f/g/a/ b)g “tr”(f/e/f/g/ a)f |

(gf)(ed) “tr”e2 (d/e/f) | D3F (AB/c/ d/c/d/A/) | B2 (d>e) d2 :: d>e | (f/e/d) (e/d/B) (d/B/A) (B/c/d/F/) |

E2 (e>f) e2 (fa) | ba (f/b/a/b/) (a/d/c/d/) (b/d/c/d/) | f2 (a>b) a3f | (g/f/g/a/) (g/b/a/g/) “tr”(f/e/f/g/) (f/a/g/f/) |

(g/a/f/g/) (e/f/d/f/) e2 (d/e/f) | D3F (AB/c/) dA | B2 (d>e) d2 :: F>E |

                       

FOR THE LAST TIME. AKA and see "Pour la Derniere Fois."

 

FOR THE SAKE OF OLD DECENCY (De Ghrá na Sean-Mheasúlachta). AKA and see "Farewell to Old Decency." Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. The first part is the same as "The Maid of Feakle,” though the ‘B’ parts differ. “Old decency” is a phrase used in Ireland to mean times past when manners and respected prevailed, as in “the man was a throwback to old decency.” The Irish collector P.W. Joyce, discussing the phrase ‘Relics of old decency,’ says that “when a man goes down in the world he often preserves some memorials of his former rank - a ring, silver buckles in his shoes, &c. - ' the relics of old decency.’” A similarly titled tune is “Moving in Decency,” and although it is musically quite different, the names do sometimes get garbled together. Source for notated version: flute, whistle and concertina player Michael Tubridy of the Chieftains (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRÉ III), 1985; No. 192, pg. 86. Claddagh CC27, Michael Tubridy ‑ "The Eagle's Whistle" (1978). Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977).

 

FOR TONIGHT WE'LL MERRY MERRY BE. AKA and see "Landlord Fill the Flowing Bowl." Scottish, Country Dance Tune (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. ABB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; No. 386, pg. 42.

X:1

T:For Tonight We’ll Merry Merry Be

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 3, No. 386  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

f|dAFA|d>ddd|e>eee|(f2 d)f|dAFA|d/d/d/d/ dd|e/e/e/e/ ee|(f2 d)||

|:A|f>ffa|(a/g/)g/g/ g2|e>eeg|(g/f/)f/f/ f2|d>ddf|f/e/e/e/ ge|dcBc|(e2 d):|

 

FORADALE HORNPIPE, THE. Shetland, Hornpipe. Fairly recently composed by Ronald Jamieson.

 

FORAER A NEAINTÍN. Irish, Polka. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 8.

 

FORBES LEITH. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. One of the six hundred or so compositions by J. Scott Skinner. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 44.

 

FORBES LODGE. Scottish, Slow Air or Strathspey (cut time). D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c), 1866; No. 78, pg. 27.

 

FORBES MILL. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB’. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler and composer Dan R. MacDonald (1911-1976). Cameron (Trip to Windsor), 1994; pg. 62.

 


FORBES MORRISON. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard tuning. AB (Hardie, Hunter): AAB (Martin, Skinner). Composed by J. Scott Skinner, it appears in his Logie Collection. It was included as one of the tunes Skinner used in 1921 concert tours in the romantically entitled set "Spey's Fury's." Forbes Morrison (1833‑1906), according to Hunter (1979), was a fiddler and dancing master in Tarves, Aberdeenshire, expert in the use of the Scottish fiddle ornaments of short snap bow and syncopated triplets. Purser (1992) states the tune “gives a good idea of the rhythmic vigour characteristic of the Scotch fiddle style (Skinner) so loved, and which was carried on by fiddlers such as James Dickie and John Murdoch Henderson…” Source for notated version: Hector MacAndrew [Martin]. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 55. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 123. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 4, 1991; pg. 19. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 129. Purser (Scotland’s Music), 1992; Ex. 15, pg. 238. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 10.

X:1

T:Forbes Morrison

M:C
L:1/8

R:Strathspey

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

d | c<A ({F}E>)D C>EA,>C | ({C}[D2)D2] (B>A) (3Gfe (3dcB |

c<A ({F}E>)D C>EA,>C | (3DFB (3GEG ({G}[A2)A2] [EA] :|

|| g | a>fg>e f<d e>c | d>Bc>A (3Bcde (3efg | a>fg.e f<d e>A |

(3Gfe (3dcB ({G}[A2)A2] [EA>]g | a>fg>e f>de>c | d>Bc>A (3Bcd (3efg |

(3.a.g.a (3.e.f.g (3.a.e.d (3c.B.A | (3[GG][Ff][Ee] (3[Dd][Cc][B,B] {G}[A2A2][A,EA] ||

 

FORBES’S SNEESHIN MULL.  Scottish; Slow Air, Strathspey or Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by Scots fiddler-composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904; pg. 70.

X:1

T:Forbes’s Sneeshin Mull

M:C

L:1/8

R:Slow Air, Strathspey or Reel

C:J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927)

S:Skinner – Harp and Claymore (1904)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

(c | B<)GB<d ({f}g2) d>e | ~=f2 c>f c<=FF>c | B<GB<d ({f}g2) d>f | ({f}g2) d>c B<GG>c |

B<GB<d ({f}g2) d>e | (g/=f/e/}f2) c>B A<=F~F>A | .B.G.B.d .e.c.f.d | ({f}g2 d>c B<G G ||

^d | {d}[ee] B>f ({f}g2) e>^c | ({c}d2) A>d F<DD>^d | [e2e2] B>e g2 e>c | B>G F<B G<E ~E>^d |

{^d}[e2e2] B>f ({f}g2) e>^c | d>f A>d F<DD>F | (3GAB (3ABc (3Bcd (3cde | (3ABc (3FGA B<G G ||

 

FORD ONE STEP. Old‑Time, Dance Tune. USA, Missouri. C Major. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers Association 001, Pete McMahan ‑ "Ozark Mountain Waltz." “Now That’s a Good Tune: Masters of Traditional Missouri Fiddling.”

 

FORDELL HOUSE. Scottish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. John Glen (1891) finds the earliest appearence of this tune in print in Robert Ross's 1780 collection (pg. 22). Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Dance Music), vol. 1, 1891; pg. 7.

X:1

T:Fordell House

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Glen Collection, Vol. 1  (1891)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

c|BGBd g2 (g/a/b)|BGBd cAAc|BGBd g2 (g/a/b)|AFDF (G2 G):|

c|Bgdg Bgbg|dgBg aAAc|Bgdg Bgbg|AFDF (G2 G)c|Bgdg Bgbg|

dgBg aAAc|bgaf gdec|AFDF (G2 G)||

 

FORECASTLE. Scottish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB'. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; No. 334, pg. 36. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 2; pg. 39 (appears as untitled hornpipe).

X:1

T:Forecastle

M:C

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 3, No. 334 (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A2 | f2 (ed) dcdeB | AFDF AFBA | GFEF GABc | defd A2A2 | f2 (fe) dcdB |

AFDF AFBA | GFEF GABc | d2d2d2 :: (cd) | e^dec A2 (=de) | fefd A2f2 |

gfeg fedf | edcB A2 (cd) | e^dec A2 (=de) | fefd A2a2 | ^gfef edcB |1 A2A2A2:|2 A2 (^GA) Bcde ||

 

FOREE, THE.  AKA and see “Haymaker’s (Jig) [2].” English, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABBCC. The melody appears in the 1840 music manuscript collection of Cumbrian musician John Rook.

X:1

T:Foree, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:John Rook manuscript (Cumbria, 1840)

K:G

G2B A2c|B2G AFD|G2B A2c|BGG G2:|

|:B2d g2d|gfe dcB|B2d g2d|gfe d2:|

|:c2e d2B|A2c B2G|c2e A2c|BGG G2:|

 

FOREFIT O' DA SHIP, DA. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AB (Boys/Lough): AABB (Anderson & Georgeson, Cooke, Hunter, Martin, Martin & Hughes, Phillips). In the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore widely known in the islands. Tom Anderson (1970, 1978) states the tune is supposed to be one of the tunes composed by an unknown fiddler‑whaler, inspired by the sound of the sea breaking on the bows of a sailing ship. Robin Morton (1976) believes there is Scandinavian influence apparent in the melody. Sources for notated versions: Tom Anderson (Shetland) [Phillips]; J.C. Smith (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 24. Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 20. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 46, pg. 104. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 212. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 94. Martin & Hughes (Ho-ro-gheallaidh), 1990; pg. 32. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 20. Philo 1042, Boys of the Lough ‑ "The Piper's Broken Finger" (1976). Thule Records 214, Tom Anderson. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson ‑ "Shetland Folk Fiddling, vol. 2" (1978). Transatlantic TRA 311, Boys of the Lough, "The Piper's Broken Finger."

X:1

T:Forfeit o’ da Ship, Da

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel

K:D

AB|d2 dB dA F2|ABAF EDEF|(3AAA AF ABde|f2 ed B2:|

|:AB|d2 fd adfd|d2 fd eAAf|(a2 a)e fdef|dBAF E2:|

                       

FOREHEID OF THE SIXEREEN, DA. AKA and see "Andrew's Spring." Shetland, Shetland Reel (asymmetrical reel). Shetland, Whalsay (?). C Major. Standard tuning. AA'BB'. The title refers to the bow of a boat. Source for notated version: Andrew Poleson (Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 9, pg. 60.

                       

FOREST, THE.  Scottish, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. Gow labels the tune as “Irish.” Gow (Second Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels), 1788, 3rd edition; pg. 6.

X:1

T:Forrest [sic], The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

N:”Irish”

B:Gow – 2nd Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels, 3rd ed., pg. 6  (1788)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

(DED) “tr”(FEF)|d2d def|(DED) “tr”F2G|AFD “tr”E2D|DED “tr”FEF|

d2d d2e|fdc “tr”B>cd|1 AFD E2D:|2 AGF EFA||:B>cB “tr”BAF|

A>BA AFA|B>cB “tr”BAF|{B}AGF EFG|B>cB “tr”BAF|

AFG ABc|1 dfe dcB|{B}AGF EFA:|2 def efd|ABG FGE||

 

FOREST AND GLEN. See "Highlander's Jig." AKA‑ "Cold Winds from Ben Wyviss."

                       

FOREST DE BONDI. See "Forest of Bondi."

           

FOREST FLOOR, THE. American, Reel. E Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Vermont fiddler Pete Sutherland. Sutherland (Bareface), 1984; pg. 11.

           

FOREST FLOWER. American, Strathspey. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 169.

 

FOREST FLOWER WALTZ. AKA and see "Metsakukkia."


                       

FOREST LODGE. Scottish, Reel. Composed by John Crerar (1750‑1840), and included in McGlashan's second collection in 1786. The title has Atholl connections; he was gameskeeper at the estate, and may have taken lessons from Niel Gow, who also worked there for a time.

                       

FOREST OF BONDI. See "Forest de Bondi." English?, Country Dance (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune, titled after a forest near Paris, France, has a long history in New England. It appears in a musician’s manuscript copy-book called the Read Manuscript, from New Haven, Connecticut, dated 1798. As "Forest de Bondi‑Square Dance," the tune appears in the repertoire list of Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham (Bronner, 1987). The elderly Dunham was Henry Ford's champion fiddler in the late 1920's. Howe (c. 1867) prints instructions for a contra-dance to the tune.

***

I believe the title refers to a once well-known tale of canine attachment that is said to have occurred during the reign of Charles V:

***

A gentleman named Macaire, an officer of the king's body-guard, entertained, for some reason, a bitter hatred against another gentleman, named Aubry de Montdidier, his comrade in service. These two having met in the Forest of Bondi, near Paris, Macaire took an opportunity of treacherously murdering his brother officer, and buried him in a ditch. Montdidier was unaccompanied at the moment, excepting by a dog with which he had gone out, perhaps to hunt. It is not known whether the dog was muzzled, or from what other cause it permitted the deed to be accomplished without its interference. Be this as it might, the hound lay down on the grave of its master, and there remained till hunger compelled it to rise. It then went to the kitchen of one of Aubry de Montdidier's dearest friends, where it was welcomed warmly, and fed. As soon as its hunger was appeased, the dog disappeared. For several days this coming and going was repeated, till at last the curiosity of those who saw its movements was excited, and it was resolved to follow the animal, and see if anything could be learned in explanation of Montdidier's sudden disappearance. The dog was accordingly followed, and was seen to come to a pause on some newly-turned-up earth, where it set up the most mournful wailings and howlings. These cries were so touching, that passengers were attracted; and finally digging into the ground at the spot, they found there the body of Aubry de Montdidier. It was raised and conveyed to Paris, where it was soon after- wards interred in one of the city's cemeteries.

***

Hardings All Round Collection, 1905; No. 132, pg. 41 (appears as “Forest of Bondy”). Howe (1000 Jigs and Reels), c. 1867; pg. 81 (appears as “Forest of Bondi”).

X:1

T:Forest of Bondi

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Howe – 1000 Jigs and Reels (c. 1867)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

F/G/ | AA AA | A/B/A/G/ FA | B/G/B/d/ c/A/B/c/ | dd d/e/f/d/ | AA AA |

A/B/A/G/ FA | B/G/B/d/ c/A/B/c/ | d2 z :: f/g/ | a2 ab | ba fa | ba fd |

e/d/e/f/ e/f/g/e/ | a2 ab | ba f2 | af e/d/e/f/ | d2 z :|

                       

FOREST OF GA-ICK/GAICK, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Minor. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). The Forest of Ga-ick was a deer forest near Glen Feshie, owned by the Duke of Gordon for his hunting pleasure. The Duke, for whom Marshall worked as Steward of the Household, was an excellent shot, as was Marshall himself (Moyra Cowie, The Life and Times of William Marshall, 1999). The deer were protected and well-fed on the lush vegetation of the tract and reportedly grew to enormous size. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 52. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 240.

X:1

T:Forest of Gaick, The

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

E|D<(d d)>^c d2 d>e|c>d e<d c<C C>E|D<(d d)>^c d2 d>e|c<A c>E D2 D>E|

D<(d d)>^c d2 d>e|c>de>f g>ec>e|f>ag>e f>de>c|d<A c>E D2D||

e|f<d d>e c>d e<a|f<d d>e f<df<a|f<d d>e c>d e<g|a<f g>e d2 d>e|

f<d d>e c>d e<a|f<d d>e f<d e>=B|c>dc>G E>CE>G|A>FG>E D2D||

                       

FOREST OF GARTH, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Minor. Standard tuning. AAB (Welling): AABB' (Kerr). Composed by Neil Gow, according to David Green & Phil Hresko. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; No. 167, pg. 20. Welling (Welling’s Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 21 (includes one variation). Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan." Point Records P‑229, Bill Lamey ‑ "Canadian Jigs and Reels."

X:1

T:Forest of Garth, The

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 3, No. 167  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

F | D<(d d>)^c d2 (d>e) | c>de>d c<CC>E | D<(d d>)^c d2 d>e | c>Ac>E ({F/E/}D2)D :|

|: e | f<dd>e c>de<a | f<dd>e f>df<a |1 f<dd>e c>de<a | (3fed (3ed^c (d2d) :|2

c>dc>G E<C E<G | (3AGF (3GFE (D2D) ||

                       

FOREST OF MAR, THE. Scottish, Reel. D Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 101, pg. 35.

                       

FOREST ROAD, THE.  American, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed in the Irish style by Alstead, New Hampshire, fiddler and publisher Randy Miller. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 45, pg. 37.

 

FOREST WHERE THE DEER RESORT, THE (Sud an gleann 'sam be na feidh). Scottish, Strathspey. D Minor. Standard tuning. AA'BB'. "Sung with inimitable humour by the late Alexander Fraser, Esq. of Culduthel, and the editor's grandfather" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 25, pg. 9.

X:1

T:Forest where the Deer resort, The

T:Sud an gleann ‘sam be na feidh

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Fraser Collection  (1874)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

c|:A<d d>f c>fA>a|f>c A<F G/G/G A2|1 A<d d>f c>fA>d|

B>G G/G/G F>D D2:|2 a>gf>d c>BA>d|B>G G/G/G FD D2||

|:D>GG>B c>B A<c|B<GG>B c>A F<A|1 D<G G>B c>B A<d|

B>G G/G/G F>D D2:|2 A<d d/d/d c>A A/A/A|B>G G/G/G F>D D2||

                       

FORESTER, THE. English, Hornpipe and Morris Dance Tune (4/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. ABB. A patently hybrid tune which has the first strain of "Turkey in the Straw" as its first half while the second strain is the second of "College Hornpipe." Morris versions from the villages of Bampton and Field Town (Leafield), Oxfordshire, England. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pg. 151. Journal of the English Folk Song and Dance Socity, VIII, 1956, pg. 6.

                       

FORESTERS (HORNPIPE), THE. AKA – “Greenfields.” American, Canadian; Hornpipe. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Long a popular dance tune in the Canadian Maritimes and New England. It seems earliest published in a volume called M. Higgens’ Original Dances, Walzes & Hornpipes for the Violin (1829), where it appears under the name of "Greenfields." In Canada it was popularised through the playing of radio and TV fiddler Don Messer, and The Cape Breton Symphony (Winston Fitzgerald et al). Source for notated version: Rodney Miller (N.H.) [Phillips]. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 89. Cranford (Jerry Holland: The Second Collection), 2000; No. 98, pg. 39. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 63. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 109, pg. 70. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 116. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 194. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 123. Songer (Portland Collection, vol. 2). Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1980; pg. 17. Alcazar Dance Series FR 204, "New England Chestnets 2" (1981). Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street – “Made in Cork” (1997. Learned from Dermot McLaughlin). CAT-WMR004, Wendy MacIssac - “The ‘Reel’ Thing” (1994. Appears as “Foresters Clog”). Jerry Holland – “Master Cape Breton Fiddler” (1982. Learned from Winston Fitzgerald).

See also listings at:

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:Forester’s Hornpipe

M:C|

L:1/8

K:D

|:fg|a^g af df bg|a^g af d2cd|eA fA eA fA|ed cB A2 fg|

a^g af df bg|a^g af d2cd|BG FG Ad ce|f2d2d2:|

|:cd|ed cB AG EG|FA df a2 fa|ge Bg fd Af|ed cB A2cd|

ed cB AG EG|FA df af ba|gf ed cA Bc|d2f2d2:|

                       

FOREVER YOUNG.  American, Waltz. Composed by fiddler George Wilson (Wynanskill, New York) on commission of a friend for her aunt’s 90th birthday. RC2000, George Wilson – “Royal Circus” (2000).

                          


FORFAR HUNT, THE. Scottish, Reel. B Minor. Standard tuning. AAB (Lerwick, Shears): AABB' (Athole). Composition credited to A. Allan by MacDonald in the Skye Collection. Forfar, in Angus, is the supposed site of the last great battle between the Picts and the Scots in 845, before Kenneth MacAlpin united the kingdoms. The ‘hunt’ of the title refers to a genteel hunting and social club. Lerwick (Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 22‑23. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 66. Shears (Gathering of the Clans Collection, vol. 1), 1986; pg. 58 (pipe setting). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 133.

X:1

T:Forfar Hunt

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bmin

BFBc d2df|ceAa fedc|BFBc d2df|cAec dBB:|

|:BbBc defd|cAec acec|1 BbBc defd|cAec dBB2:|2

BFBc dcde|fdec dBB2||

                       

FORFEIT OF THE SHIP, THE. See "Forefit O' Da Ship."

                       

FORGE, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. E Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 4; No. 102, pg. 13. 

X:1

T:Forge, The

M:C
L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 4, No. 102  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

B<B B>A G>FE>G|F>DA>D F>DA>d|B<B B>A G>FE>G|B>e g/f/e/^d/ (e2 e)g:|

|:g<g b>g a>fd>f|e<e g>e f>^dB>f|g<g b>g a>fd>f|B>e g/f/e/^d/ (e2 e)g:|

                       

FORGERON, LE (The Blacksmith). AKA and see “Blacksmith’s Reel [2].” French-Canadian, Reel. A Major. AEae tuning. AA’BB’. A ‘crooked’ tune. Source for notated version: Acadien fiddler Pius Boudreault via Jean Carignan (Montreal); also André Alain (St-Basile de Portneuf) [Remon & Bouchard]. Remon & Bouchard (25 Crooked Tunes, vol. 1: Québec Fiddle Tunes), 1996; No. 20. Yvon Mimeault – “Y etait temps!/It’s About Time” (adapted from Jean Carrignan’s version).

                       

FORGET ME NOT [1]. AKA and see “Gerry Cronin’s Reel,” “Larry Redican’s [3],” “Martin Rocheford’s [1],”  Miss Ramsey’s.” Irish, Reel. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB: AA’BB’ (Connolly & Martin). Composed by New York City fiddler and composer Larry Redican, born in County Roscommon. Redican came to New York via Dublin and Toronto, and became an icon of the New York Irish music scene in the mid-20th century. Redican died on stage at Mineola, Long Island, playing for a céilí. Connolly & Martin (Forget Me Not), 2002; pgs. 34-35.

X:1

T:Forget Me Not

C:Larry Redican

R:reel

M:4/4

L:1/8

Z:Philippe Varlet

K:C

c2ec AGED|CA,~A,2 G,A,CD|EGcd ecdc|Addc dged|

c2ec AGED|CA,~A,2 G,A,CD|EGce dBcA|GEDF ECCG:||

c2gc acgc|fcec dcAc|Gc~c2 Gcea|gece d2eg|

agea gede|cd (3edc dcAG|EGce dBcA|GEDF ECCG:||

 

FORGET ME NOT [2]. Irish, Polka. D Major ('A' part), A Major ('B' part) & G Major (Trio). Standard tuning. AABB, Trio. Roche Collection, 1982, vol. 3; No. 154, pg. 51.

 

FORGET ME NOT [3]. AKA and see “Boy in the Gap,” “Kilkenny Boys,” “Lady Mary Ramsey [2],” “Miss Ramsay [2],” “The Queen’s Shilling.” American?, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), pg. 49. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 77.

X:1

T:Forget Me Not [3]

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G | G>e d/B/B/e/ | d/B/B/e/ d/B/d/g/ | G>.e d/B/B/d/ | e/g/d/B/ A/G/E/D/ |

G>e d/B/B/e/ | d/B/B/e/ d/B/d/g/ | G>e d/B/B/d/ | e/g/d/B/ A :: g/a/ |

b/g/g/b/ a/f/f/a/ | g/e/e/g/ d/B/B/g/ | b/g/g/b/ a/f/f/a/ | g/e/d/B/ .Ag/a/ |

b/g/g/b/ a/f/f/a/ | g/e/e/g/ d/B/B/g/ | b/g/a/f/ g/e/f/d/ | (3e/f/g/.d/.B/ A :|

                       

FORGET NOT THE ANGELS (Na Dearmad Na Aingealaide). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). E Minor. Standard tuning. One part. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 332, pg. 57.

X:1

T:Forget not the Angels

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Slow Air

N:”Slow and tenderly”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 332

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

GA|B2B2 AG|df e>d BA|G2 EG F>E|E4 B^d|e2 egfe|e2d2 ef|g2 fedB|^d2e2 Bd|

E2 egfe|e2 dz ef|g2 fedc|^d2 e2 GA|(B2 B>)A GE|D>de>dBA|G2 EG F>E|(E2 E)z||

                       

FORGET YOUR TROUBLES. AKA and see "Denis O'Keeffe's (Favourite)." Irish, Slide (12/8 time). A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. In liner notes to Jackie Daly's "Many's a Wild Night," Máire O'Keefe says this tune is a great favourite of Maurice O'Keeffe who says he learned it from the playing of Do/nal O'Connor, the great Brosna fiddle player now living in Limerick. Gael Linn CEF176, Jackie Daly - "Many's a Wild Night."

X:1

T:Forget Your Troubles

D:Jackie Daly, "Many's a Wild Night", track 6(a)

M:12/8

L:1/8

R:slide

Z:Paul de Grae

K:Ador

"Am" E2 A ABA "G" G2 A B2 d | "Am" e2 B dBA "G" G3 "Em" GED |

"Am" E2 A ABA "G" G2 A B2 d | 1 "Em" e2 d BdB "Am" A3 "Em" e3 :||

2 "Em" e2 d BdB "D" A3 A3 ||

||: "Am" e2 e efe "D" d2 d dBd | "Am" e2 B dBA"G" G3 "Em" GED |

"Am" E2 A ABA "G" G2 A B2 d | "Em" e2 d BdB "D" A3 A3 :||

***

Am / G / | Am / G Em | Am /  G / | 1 Em / Am Em :|| 2 Em / D / ||

||: Am / D / | Am / G Em | Am / G / | Em / D / :||

                       

FORGIVE THE MUSE THAT SLUMBERED.  AKA and see “Bhíosa lá I bport láirge,” "The Dainty Besom Maker," "The Gimlet," “I’d  mourn the hopes that leave me,” “Johnny’s Grey Breeks [2],” "The Old Lea Rigg," "Little Mary Cullinan," "Little Sheila Connellan,” “Maureen from Giberland,” “Port Láirge,” “The Rose Tree [1],” “The Rose Tree in Full Bearing."

                       

FORGLEN HOUSE. Scottish, Strathspey. C Minor. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). A note in Marshall’s collection reads: "Although this strathspey was composed by Mr. Marshall, it appears in Mr. C. Duff's Collection under another name.” Duff was a dancing master and music publisher in Dundee. Many of Marshall's tunes entered general circulation before he himself published them, and many were published by others, before Marshall’s publications and sometimes with other names. Forglen House in on the banks of the River Deveron, near Turriff, Aberdeenshire, home of a branch of the Abercromby of Birkenbog family. The name Forglen or Foreglen distinguishes it from the neighboring parish of Alvah or Back Glen. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 28.

X:1

T:Forglen House

M:C

L:1/8
R:Strathspey
S:Marshall – 1822 Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Cmin

G|cccG [A,3A3]F|GG GE/G/ F/E/D/C/ B,D|E/D/E/F/ G/F/G/=A/ B/A/B/c/ BG|

G/F/E/D/ BD C2 CG|cccG [A,3A3] F|GG GE/G/ F/E/D/C/ B,D|

E/D/E/F/ G/F/G/=A/ B/A/B/c/ Bf|e/d/c/B/ fd ~c2 c/d/e/f/||g<c g>f gccd/e/|

~f>gfd ~B>cdf|g<c g>f gcce|e/d/c/B/ g/f/e/d/ c2 c/d/e/f/|gcg>f gc cd/e/|

f/g/a/b/ f/e/d/c/ ~B>cdf|gbfg df cd|BF/B/ G/F/E/D/ C2C||

                       

FORGOTTEN WALTZ. American, Waltz. G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Source for notated versions: Lyman Enloe (1906-1997, Missouri), learned at the age of 17 when confined to a sickbed with the measles, from the playing of his father Lige and his father’s friend Lee Carpenter (Eldon, Missouri), who had come to visit [Beisswenger & McCann, Phillips]. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozarks Fiddle Tunes), 2008; pg. 29. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 255. Grey Eagle Records, Lyman Enloe – “Now That’s a Good Tune” (1991).

                       

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

Please help maintain the viability of the Fiddler’s Companion on the Web by respecting the copyright.

For further information see Copyright and Permissions Policy or contact the author.

 

 

 


 [COMMENT1]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT2]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - On.

 [COMMENT3]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT4]Note:  The change to pitch (12) and font (1) must be converted manually.