The Fiddler’s Companion

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

[COMMENT1] [COMMENT2] 

MAC

 

 

Notation Note: The tunes below are recorded in what is called “abc notation.” They can easily be converted to standard musical notation via highlighting with your cursor starting at “X:1” through to the end of the abc’s, then “cutting-and-pasting” the highlighted notation into one of the many abc conversion programs available, or at concertina.net’s incredibly handy “ABC Convert-A-Matic” at

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html 

 

**Please note that the abc’s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc conversion programs. For example, I use abc2win and abcNavigator 2 with no problems whatsoever with direct cut-and-pasting. However, due to an anomaly of the html, pasting the abc’s into the concertina.net converter results in double-spacing. For concertina.net’s conversion program to work you must remove the spaces between all the lines of abc notation after pasting, so that they are single-spaced, with no intervening blank lines. This being done, the F/C abc’s will convert to standard notation nicely. Or, get a copy of abcNavigator 2 – its well worth it.   [AK]

 

 

 

MAC... See also Mc...

                       

MAC A' BHAILLIDH A UIST. AKA and see "Darling of the Uist Lasses."

                       

MAC-ALLA, AN. AKA and see "The Echo."

                       

MAC AN PIOBAIRE. AKA and see "The Piper's Son."

                       

MAC AOIDH. AKA and see "Lord Reay."

                       


MAC ARDLE’S FAVOURITE. AKA and see “The Maidens of Tir Eoghain.” The tune appears in O’Neill’s Music of Ireland as “McArdle’s Favorite.”

                       

MAC DHOMHNUIL MOR NAN EILEAN. AKA and see "MacDonald, Lord of the Isles."

                       

MAC MHIC AILEIN. AKA and see "Clanranald."

                       

MAC MHIC ALASTAIR. AKA and see "Glengarry."

                       

MAC MORIN’S JIG. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. E Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB’. Composed by the late Inverness, Cape Breton, fiddler and composer Jerry Holland (1955-2009), for a young piano player who visited him occasionally. Cranford (Jerry Holland: The Second Collection), 2000; No. 280, pg. 100. Odyssey ORCS 1051, Jerry Holland – “Fiddler’s Choice” (1999).

                                   

MAC SHIMI MOR A BASACHADH. AKA and see "Lord Lovat Beheaded."

                       

MAC SUIBHNE'S REEL. Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) relates that the famous Donegal fiddlers, Mickey and John Doherty, spun the tale that their father (who was a fiddler also) on his death-bed asked for his fiddle and proceeded to play "Mac Suibhne's Reel." His playing was so masterful, even at the end, that the tip of his bow whistled (a mark of accomplished musicianship which the Dohertys said happened regularly in the old man's playing), and, finished with the tune, he directed the fiddle be hung back up on the wall. When he died shortly thereafter the fiddle burst into pieces, never to be played again.  Mac Aoidh points out that the shattering of the fiddle upon death is a bit of supernatural lore commonly found in the British Isles, where musicianship was once thought to have been divinely inspired.

 

MACALISTER WEARS A DIRK (Biodag Air Mac Alasdair). Scottish, Reel. E Dorian ('A' part) & A Mixolydian ('B' part). Standard tuning. AAB. MacDonald (The Skye Collecton), 1887; pg. 15.

X:1

T:Biodag Air Mac Alasdair

T:MacAlister Wears a Dirk

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:MacDonald – Skye Collection  (1887)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

B(ee)d cA B2|cA AB =GA B2|B(ee)=g dgBd|cA A/A/A ^GEE:|

e|cA A/A/A d=GdB|cAAc dB=GB|cA A/A/A d=GdB|cAAB =GEEe|

cA A/A/A d=GdB|cAAc dB=GB|cA A/A/A (dB) B/B/B|[cf]A A/A/A =GEE||

 

MACALISDRUM'S MARCH (“Máirseáil Alasdroin” or “Máirseáil Alasdruim”). AKA and see “Allistrum’s March [1],” "Alasdruim's March," "The Church Hill [2]," "Kitty the Rag, I'm in Love with You,” "MacDonnell's March,” “Máirseáil Alasdruim [1], [2], [3],” “Ollistrum Jig" (O’Neill). Irish, Scottish; March (6/8 time). Ireland, Munster. D Major. Standard tuning. AABBCC (Bunting): ABCD (O’Neill): AABBCCDD (Johnson).

***

Alaster or Alexander MacDonnell, also known as Alasdair Mac Allisdrum/MacAllistrum or Colkittu (Colkitto), was a commander who was killed at the battle of Knockinoss (Cnoc na nDos, or Shrub Hill), near Mallow, County Cork, in the south of Ireland, in September, 1647. The famous martial hero was a Scotsman, a brave and skilful warrior who commanded Lord Antrim's Irish in Scotland under Montrose, and when Montrose's army was broken up he and his Irish returned to Ireland, joining the confederation of Catholics under Lord Taaffe in Munster. At the battle of Cnoc na nDos (Knockinoss) one account (quoted by Grattan Flood, 1906) gives that he was assassinated while parlaying with the English Parliamentary forces under Lord Inchiquinn, while Bunting (1840) states that "after the rout of the main body of the Irish, Macdonnell and his people held their ground till they were cut to pieces by the English. It is said that none escaped.” MacDonnell’s  sword, which had a steel apple running in a groove on the back supposedly to increase the striking force, was in Bunting's time said to still have been preserved in Loghan Castle, County Tipperary. Bunting (1840) states Allisdrum was the son of Coll Kittogh (Ciotach) or Left-handed Coll, also a famous warrior whose name has been preserved by Milton in the lines:

***

Why, it is harder, Sirs, than Gordon,

Colkittor, or MacDonnall, or Galasp.

***

Flood (1906) states: “We may form some idea of the desperate courage which inspired these men from the impetuous energy and wild shrilly fervour of this strain, which is undoubtedly the same pibroach (pipe tune) that they marched to on the morning of their last battle…This march was played at his funeral by war‑pipers when his remains were interred in the ancestral tomb of the O'Callaghans at Clonmeen (near Kanturk), County Cork, and ever since has been called "Máirseáil Alasdroim." Breathnach (1966) believes that Flood’s statement that the piece was a death-march especially composed by the Irish warpipers at the time is almost certainly untrue, and notes Flood now has a reputation for repeating some extremely questionable assertions.

***

In 1750 Dr. Charles Smith (in his History of Cork, volume II, pg. 159) noted the tune was "well‑known in Munster...a wild rhapsody...much esteemed by the Irish and played at all their feasts" (Flood, 1906; Bunting, 1840). Despite its supposed age, however, the oldest appearance of the noted music is to be found in a MS collection from Lisronagh (near Clonmel), County Tipperary, dating from 1784, and Crofton Croker's 1824 Researches in the South of Ireland also contains a printing of the piece. According to O’Neill (1913), Croker acknowledged its popularity in the south of Ireland but thought that “Ollistrum’s March” (as he called it) should not be considered an Irish air, but rather Scottish due to its stylistic similarity to the pibroch of that country. Again, Breathnach (1966) demures, saying that there is no good grounds for Croker’s assertion that “Allasdrum’s March” is not Irish. Paddy Moloney of the Chieftains seems to split the difference when he states the tune reflects the "rich fertilisation between Irish and Scottish harpers and pipers."

***

Croker goes on to say: “The estimation in which it is held in Ireland is wonderful. I have heard this march, as it is called, sung by hundreds of the Irish peasantry who imitate the drone of the bagpipe in their manner of singing it. On that instrument I have also heard it played and occasionally with much pleasure from the peculiar and powerful expression given by the performer.” O'Sullivan (1983) notes the piece is printed by Bunting (1840) but that his version is only a section of a longer descriptive piece for pipers called "Máriseáil Alasdruim." It is a relatively complicated programmatic tune, in its entirety. Goodman, writing in 1861, described the piece as he heard it from Kerry pipers:

***

…(It) contains in addition to the March, the Gathering, the Battle,

the shouts on the fall of Allisdrum, and the cries, first of the mother,

the Munsterwoman, then that of his nurse, a Leinsterwoman, with

the lament of his wife, the Ulsterwoman, and the piece concludes

with the old jig ‘Cnocán an Teampuill’ which she is said to have

struck up so soon as she ascertained that her husband was really dead.

***

A variant of the piece is called “Sarsfield’s Quickstep” and appears in Haverty’s Three Hundred Irish Airs (1858-1859). See also the Kerry variant “Micky "Cumbaw" O’Sullivan’s.” Sources for notated versions: Bunting noted the piece from "a piper at Westport (Co. Mayo), 1802"; Willie Clancy (Miltown Malbay, County Clare), who had his version from an old piper, Mickey McMahon, who lived at Kilcororan (County Clare) and called it “Alexander’s March” [Breathnach]. O’Neill (1913), pg. 124 (appears as “Allistrum’s March”). Breathnach (Ceol II, 3), 1966. Breathnach (The Man and His Music), 1997; pg. 18. Bunting (Ancient Music of Ireland), 1840 (appears as “Allistrum’s March”). Heymann (Off the Record), 1990; pgs. 10-11. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician No. 5: Mostly Irish Airs), 1985 (revised 2000); pg. 17. O’Neill (Music of Ireland), 1903; No. 1802. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 112, pgs. 161-162. Claddagh CC17, Sean Keane - "Gusty's Frolics" (1975. Appears as “Micky ‘Cumbaw’ O’Sullivan’s”). Island ILPS9432, The Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat" (1976). RCA 09026-61490-2, The Chieftains - "The Celtic Harp" (1993). Temple Records 013, Ann Heymann & Alison Kinnaird – “Harper’s Land” (1983).

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:MacAllistrum's March

R:march

D:Chieftain's - Celtic Harp

Z:Michael Hogan

M:6/8

L:1/8

K:D

|:Fdd fee|fdd dBA|Fdd fee|fdd B2A:|

|:~F2E FDD|Fdd dBA|~F2E FDD|Fdd B2A:|

|:d2f e2f|ded dBA|d2f e2f|ded B2A:|

|~B2A B2E|~B2A BAF|(3Bcd B c2F|(3Bcd B cAF|

~B2A B2E|~B2A BAF|BdB c2F|Bdc BAG||

X:2

T:Máirseáil Alasdruim

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Breathnach (Man and His Music, 1997)

K:G

c|ABG AGF|G2g fdc|ABG AGF|Ggf d2c|

ABG AGF|Ggg fdc|ABB cBc|dgf d2c:|

|:Aff Agg|age fdc|Aff Agg|age (3dedc|

Aff Agg|bag fde|fef g3|age d2:|


 

MACALLAN. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 10.

X:1

T:MacAllan

M:C
L:1/8

R:Strathspey

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

D | C<E {G}(A>B) (c/B/).A/.G/ ({G}A>)c | d>ef>e (d/c/).B/.A/ G<B |

(C<E) [AA>]B (c/B/).A/.G/ A>a | f/g/a/f/ ea {c/d/}cA[EA] :|

|| g | ({g}a>)A .c/.d/.e (f>a)(e>a) | (d>a)(c>a) ({B/c/}B>)A G<B |

({g}a>)A .c/.d/.e (f>a)(e>a) | d>fB>e ({B/c/}c>)A[EA>]g |

({g}a>)A .c/.d/.e (f>a)(e>a) | (d>a)(c>a) ({B/c/}B>)A G<B |

(3.A/.B/.c/ (3.d/.e/.f/ (3.c/d./e/ ({g}a>)g | (f/g/a) (e>a) ({c/d/}c)A[EA] ||

                       

MACALLISTRUM'S MARCH (Mairseail Alasdroim). See "Mac Alisdrum's March." 

                       

MACANIRISH. AKA and see “Innis Dhombs’ Ca’l Cadal.” Scottish, Strathspey.

           

MACARONI.  English, Country Dance Tune (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Macaroni was 18th century slang for a dandified young gentleman; a preening aristocrat. The melody also appears in Straight & Skillern’s Two Hundred and Four Favourite Country Dances, vol. 1 (London, 1775) and Longman, Lukey and Broderip’s Bride’s Favourite Collection of 200 Select Country Dances, Cotillions (London, 1776). Thompson (Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3), 1773; No. 8.

X:1

T:Macaroni, The

M:2/4

L:1/8

B:Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3 (London, 1773)

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

df/(g/ a)f|dAFA|(BG)(GE)|(BG)(GE)|df/(g/ a)f|dAFA|(AF)(FD)|(AF)(FD):|

|:EA/(B/ c)A|(ec)(cA)|(fd)(dB)|(fd)(dB)|g(e/f/ g)e|f(d/e/ f)d|e(c/d/ e)c|d2 D2:||

           

MACARTHUR ROAD. English, Reel. E Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. Composed by Boys of the Lough member Dave Richardson, originally from Northumberland (see also his jig “Calliope House”). Culburnie Records CUL 121D, Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas – “Fire and Grace” (2004).

X:1
T:MacArthur Road
R:reel
D:Four Men and a Dog: Barking Mad 

C: Dave RIchardson
Z:id:hn-reel-497

Z:transcribed by henrik.norbeck@mailbox.swipnet.se
M:C|
L:1/8
K:E
B2GB Bcef|~g3e fece|~f3e fece|fage fece|
B2GB Bcef|~g3e fece|~f3g fece|[1 Beef ~e3c:|[2 Beef e2ga||
|:be~e2 bec'e|be~e2 fece|~f3g fece|fage fece|
|[1 be~e2 bec'e|be~e2 fece|~f3g fece|Beef efga:|
|[2 ~B3G Bcef|~g3e fece|~f3g fece|Beef e2ec||

           

MACARTHUR’S TUNE (Port ‘ic Artair). AKA and see “Arthur Murray’s Reel,” “Hills of Cape Mabou,” “Lord Murray’s Strathspey.”

                       

MACBETH. English? Scottish?. Chappell (1859) says that, while the air is sometimes claimed as Scottish, it is in fact of English composition. It appears in the Leyden Manuscript of c. 1692.

                       

MACBETH’S STRATHSPEY. AKA and see “Lady MacKenzie of Seaforth.” Scottish, Strathspey. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AA’B. A traditional pipe tune known under the above title by pipers. Source for notated version: learned by the late Cape Breton fiddler Jerry Holland (1955-2009, Inverness, Cape Breton) from a 78 RPM recording of Little Jack MacDonald [Cranford]. Cranford (Jerry Holland’s), 1995; No. 30, pg. 9. Jerry Holland – “Crystal Clear” (2000).

                       

MACCALLUM’S. AKA and see “The Chapel Bell.” Irish, Jig. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, vol. 3, No. 66.

                       

MACCRAE’S FANCY. Scottish, Country Dance Tune (cut time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Aird (Selections), vol. 2, c. 1786; Pg. 5, No. 12.

X:1

T:MacCrae’s Fancy

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Aird, vol. II  (1786)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A/G/ | FA dd d2 cB | cdec A2 AG | FG dg fedc | d2 AF D3 :|

|: G | GFED FAAF | GFGA B3A | dcde gfed | fgab a2A2 |

GFED FAAF | GFGA B2d2 | AFdA BGFE | D2 DD D3 :|

                       

MACCRIMMONS LAMENT [1] (Cumha MhicCriomain). AKA and see "Cha Till Mi Tuille" (Never More Shall I Return), "Cha Till MacCruimen (Macrimmon Will Never Return)." AKA and see "Cha Till MacCruimen." Scottish, (very) Slow Air (4/4 time). Scotland, Isle of Skye. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AA'BB'. A note in Keith MacDonald's Skye Collection notes the setting of this tune is particular to the Island of Skye. Neil (1991) identifies the air (which originally was in Gaelic, though has a rhyming English version also) as a bagpipe lament and a pibroch (píobaireachd) theme which can be found in numerous versions, originally composed to honor the head of the legendary Macrimmon family. One story (related by Neil) goes that it was the work of a Macrimmon sister, written on the eve of her brother’s departure for the camp of Bonnie Prince Charlie in the mid‑18th century. Another story (from Pulver and Collinson, 1975) is that the MacCrimmons did not support the Jacobite cause and that “MacCrimmon’s Lament” was composed by Domhnall Bŕn MacCrimmon when he left Skye, the chorus of the song predicting that he would never return. The luckless piper was the only person on either side killed at the rout of Moy in 1745, when he was travelling in the company of the MacLeods and Lord Loudon who had hoped capture the Prince. The story goes that their plan, well executed up to a point, was foiled by the bravery and cunning of five or six men who were retainers of Lady MacKintosh of Moy Hall, with whom the Bonnie Prince Charlie was staying.  It came to the Lady’s attention that a body of men were moving to waylay him, and she entrusted Charlie’s defense to this nameless smith, who stationed his few comrades in concealed stations along the line of advance. The men would in turn fire their muskets and call upon the (non-existent) Camerons, Frasers, MacDonalds and other clans to advance, sending Loudon’s forces into a panic. The luckless MacCrimmon (sometimes spelled McCrummen) was the only casualty.

***

Donald Báin was one of the two sons of Patrick Og MacCrimmon, the other being Malcolm MacCimmon, also a famous piper. So great was Donald Bain’s reputation, however, that when he was captured by the Jacobites at the Battle of Inverurie, two months before his death, pipers in the Jacobite army (many of whom had been trained by Donald himself) went on strike and refused to play until he was given his freedom.

***

The Macrimmon family, through several generations, achieved the inherited position of pipers to the lairds of MacLeod of Dunvegan in the Isle of Skye, from 1570 to 1825. They were famous as composers and exponents of the art of pibroach playing, and some say the form originated with them, though the origins of piobraireachd are obscure. They were also associated with a school of piping whose founding has been credited to Patrick Macrimmon (Padruig Mor) around 1664, and which existed until 1770. It was situated in Boreraig in Skye (where the MacCimmons held land, just across the water from Dunvegan castle) and attracted pipers from all over the Highlands. The story is told that the course at one time lasted seven years (Collinson, 1975; Neil, 1991).

***

Source for notated version: Miss Jessie Macleod Gesto (Isle of Skye) [Skye]. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 182. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 160, pg. 207 (appears as "Cha Till MacCruimen").

X:1

T:MacCrimmon’s Lament

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Air

S:MacDonald – Skye Collection  (1887)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Dorian

A>A e2 d2 {d}e2 | A2 {bag}f2 e>deA |1 G2 (3GBd {e}dB dA :|2

G2 (3GBd e2 dB | G>G B2 e2 d>A |: g>feA g>feA | g>feA g>feA |1 g>edG g>edG |

g>edG d>B A2 :|2 G2 (3GBd e2 dB | G2 (3GBd e2 dA ||

 

MACCRIMMON'S LAMENT [2] (“Cumha Mhic Criomain” or “Cha těl Mac Crimman”). Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). A Minor. Standard tuning. One part (Martin/1988): AB (Martin/2002): AABBCCDD (Morison). The melody is a 6/8 setting of version #1. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 2, 1988; pg. 37. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 62. Morison (Highland Airs and Quicksteps, vol. 1), c. 1882; No. 31, pg. 16.

X:1

T:MacCrimmon’s Lament [2]

T:Cha těl Mac Crimmnan

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:March

N:”Slowly”

S:Morison – Highland Airs and Quicksteps, vol. 1 (c. 1882)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Amin

A | e2d e2A | e2d e<AB | d2G d2G | B2d BAA :: A{A}a2g a2A | a2g aAB |

d2G d2G | B2d BAA :: {A}eA (3f/e/d/ eA (3f/e/d/ | eA (3f/e/d/ eAB | dG (3e/d/B/ dG (3e/d/B/ |

dGB BAz :: e2 d/B/ A2 ^f/d/ | e2 d/B/ eAB | B2 e/A/ G2 e/d/ | B2 e/d/ BAz :|

                       

MACDERMOT ROE. Irish, March (6/8 time). F Major. Standard tuning. AB. Credited to Turlough O’Carolan (1670-1738) by O’Neill. The MacDermot Roes were a powerful family from County Roscommon. Donal O’Sullivan records that the MacDermott Roe family, were, "one of the two branches of the ancient Connacht clan, the MacDermotts, Princes of Moylurg. They were also Catholic. O’Neill (1922) remarks: “Among Carolan's many distinguished friends and patrons, no one was more generous and loyal than Mrs. McDermot Roe, of Alderford House, County Roscommon. At the outset of his professional career in 1693, it was she who equipped him with a horse and an attendant harper; and it was to her hospitable home he directed his feeble footsteps in his declining days. Exceptionally honored in death, Carolan's remains were interred near the family vault of his benefactress.” A later MacDermot Roe figures in a story related by the blind harper Arthur O’Neill (1734-1818). O’Neill related in his memoirs meeting many different itinerant harpers in his wanderings, one of whom was named Andrew Victory, a blind harper from County Longford. “He told me once in the County of Roscommon at the house of a Mr. MacDermot Roe, who said to him one day, ‘Th’anam ‘un deabhail’ [damn you], where were you the day the Battle of Culloden was fought?’ (an allusion the harper’s name, Victory, juxtaposed with the defeat of the Jacobite Bonnie Prince Charlie, an Irish and Scottish hope). ‘Och sir,’ says Andrew, ‘it was well for the Duke of Cumberland I was not, otherwise he would not have the honour of being called Billy the Butcher.” The Duke of Cumberland, William, son of George III, was indeed called Butcher Cumberland for his harsh repression of the Jacobite rebels, and Andrew boasts had he been there the outcome would have been different. Source for notated vesion: copied from the Hibernian Muse (1787) [O’Neill]. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 72.

X:1

T:McDermot Roe

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Carolan - Hibernian Muse 1787

Z:Paul Kinder

R:Air

K:F

c|AFF Acc|f2 F fed|e/2f/2gc dcB|Acc f2 g|

ab/2a/2g ab/2a/2g|fdd d2 e/2f/2|gcg ga/2g/2f|ec/2d/2e f2 c|

AFF cA/2B/2c/2A/2|FA/2B/2c/2A/2 F2 f|ecc dB/2c/2d/2B/2|

c/2B/2A/2B/2c/2A/2 G>AG|FAf fFf|gcg afa|agf ece|fFF F3||

GCC GCC|AF/2G/2A/2F/2 BGG|A/2B/2cc d/2e/2ff|e/2f/2gg ece|

fc'b a/2b/2c'/2b/2a/2g/2|fcf fcf|bg/2a/2b/2g/2 fd/2e/2f/2d/2|

Bc/2d/2g ece|f2 F fed|c2 A BAG|A/2B/2cc fg/2f/2e|f3-f2||

                       

MACDONAHUE'S HORNPIPE. American, Hornpipe or Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. Source for notated version: Mrs. Sarah Armstrong, (near) Derry, Pennsylvania, November 18, 1943 [Bayard]. Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 73.

                       

MACDONALD. Scottish, Strathspey (Slow when not danced). C Minor (Gow): E Minor (Johnson). Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Scottish fiddler-composer Niel Gow (1727-1807). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 127. Johnson (Kitchen Musician No. 10: Airs and Melodies of Scotland’s Past), 1991 (revised 2001); pg. 11.

X:1

T:MacDonald

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Gow

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Cmin

E/D/|CGEc GCEc|B<dF<B D>B, D/E/F/D/|CGEc GCE>g|e>c (e/d/)c/B/ “tr”c2 c:||

e/f/|g<c e>c gceg|f>B (e/d/)c/B/ fBdf|g<c e>c gcf(a|g>ef>d ({=B}”tr”c2) (c/d/)e/f/|

g<c e>c gceg|f<B (e/d/)c/B/ fBd(f|g>ef>d e>cd>B|G>c =B/c/d/B/ “tr”c2 c||

                       

MACDONALD MARCH, THE. Canadian, Scottish; March (2/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABBCC. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; pg. 47. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 98 (appears as "The MacDonalds"). Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 180, pg. 124.

X:1

T:Macdonald's March

M:2/4

L:1/16

Z:Transcribed by Bruce Osborne

K:A

ed|c2Bc A2A2|cAce a2ef|=g2ae =g2de|=gdBA =GAB=G|

c2Bc A2A2|cAce a2ef|=gdBA =GABd|c2A2 A2:|

|:e2|AAa2 =g2ea|=gefe a2ef|=g2ae =g2de|=gdBA =GAB=G|

AAa2 =gea2|=gefe a2ef|=gdBA =GABd|c2A2 A2:|

|:E2|ABcd eaec|ABcd ecA2|=GABc d=gdB|=GABc dB=G2|

ABcd eaea|=gefe a2ef|=gdBA =GABd|c2A2 A2:|

           

MACDONALD, LORD OF THE ISLES (Mac Dhomhnuill mňr nan Eilean). Scottish, Slow Air (3/4 time). B Minor. Standard tuning. AB. This tune "is, perhaps, the most ancient air in this volume, and was communicated through the gentlemen mentioned in the Prospectus. It is remarkable that the first measure of it is the air sung in the North to the very ancient Scottish ballad of 'Sir James the Rose'" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 217, pg. 89.

X:1

T:MacDonald Lord of the Isles

T:Mac Dhomhnuill mňr nan Eilean

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Slow Air

S:Fraser Collection  (1874)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bmin

F B>d|[^A2c2] F/z/ A B>d|c2 zf d>c|(B2 c/)z/ d c>B|A F>z A F>E|

(F B/)z/ c d>B|(c B>)z||c d>e|(f2 g/)z/ f e>d|c2 zf d>c|(B2 c/)z/ d c>B|

A F>z A F>E|(F2 A/)z/ B A>E|F2 zA F>E|F2 zA F>E|(F2 B/)z/ c d>c| (c B>)z||

           

MACDONALD OF THE ISLES MARCH TO HARLAW. AKA and see “March of Donald Lord of the Isles to the Battle of Harlaw (1411).” Scottish, March (6/8 time). A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. The melody commemorates the Battle of Harlaw, fought in 1411, and is popular as both a pipe and fiddle tune. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 4, 1991; pg. 17. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 70. WMT002, Wendy MacIsaac – “That’s What You Get” (1998?).

                       


MACDONALD OF THE ISLES' SALUTATION. Scottish. From Daniel Dow's 18th century publication "Ancient Scots Music". "MacDonald of the Isles is a poetic title for  the MacDonalds of Sleat, the southerly part of the Isle of Skye" (Williamson). Flying Fish FF 358, Robin Williamson ‑ "Legacy of the Scottish Harpers, vol. 1."

 

MACDONALDS, THE. See "MacDonald March."

 

MACDONALD'S MARCH, THE. Scottish, March (2/4 time) or Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB’ (Perlman): AABBCC (Kerr): AA’BBCC’ (Hart & Sandall). The melody entered French-Canadian tradition through Cape Breton sources, especially fiddler Joseph Cormier. Hart & Sandall call it “a recent arrival.” Sources for notated versions: Johnny Morrissey (1913-1994, Newtown Cross & Vernon River, Queens County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; accordion and piano player Denis Pépin {Breakeyville, near Québec City} [Hart & Sandell]. Hart & Sandall (Danse ce Soir), 2000; No. 69, pg. 104 (appears as “MacDonald’s”). Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; No. 423, pg. 47. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 93. La Bottine souriante – “Tout comme au jour de l’an” (1987). Nightingale – “Sometimes when the Moon is High” (1996). Maggie's Music MM107, "Music in the Great Hall" (1992).

X:1

T:MacDonald’s March, The

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:March

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 3, No. 423  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

(e/A/)|c(B/c/) AA|c/A/c/e/ a(e/f/)|=g(a/e/) g(d/e/)|=g/d/B/A/ =G/A/B/G/|c(B/c/) AA|

c/A/c/e/ a(e/f/)|=g/d/B/A/ =G/A/B/d/|cAA::e|A/A/a =ge/a/|=g/e/f/e/ a(e/f/)|

=g(a/e/) g(d/e/)|=g/d/B/A/ =G/A/B/G/|A/A/a =g/e/a|=g/e/f/e/ a(e/f/)|=g/d/B/A/ =G/A/B/d/|

cAA::E|A/B/c/d/ e/a/e/c/|A/B/c/d/ (e/c/)A|=G/A/B/c/ d/=g/d/B/|=G/A/B/c/ (d/B/G)|

A/B/c/d/ e/a/e/a/|=g/e/f/e/ a(e/f/)|=g/d/B/A/ =G/A/B/d/|cAA:|

 

MACDONALD'S MARCH TO THE WAR. Scottish, March (6/8 time). A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AAB. Gatherer (Gatherer’s Musical Museum), 1987; pg. 45. Scottish Pipers' Society Book of Tunes (1912).

 

MACDONALDS OF HAMILTON, THE. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. F Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by fiddler Jerry Holland (Inverness, Cape Breton). Cranford (Jerry Holland’s), 1995; No. 255, pg. 73.

 

MACDONALD’S OF CLANRANALD’S GATHERING TO SHERIFFMUIR. Scottish, Pipe Pibroch. The tune was composed following the Jacobite rising of 1715.

 

MACDONALD’S QUICKSTEP. AKA and see "Charlie, If You Would Only Come,“ “Charlie’s Welcome [2],” “Flora MacDonald,” “MacDonald’s Reel [2],” “Miss Flora McDonald’s Reel,” “Miss Macdonald’s (Reel) [4],” “Thearlaich! Nan Tigeadh Tu [1],"

 

MACDONALD'S RANT. Scottish, Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). This melody appears in the Bodleian Manuscript (in the Bodelian Library, Oxford), inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland written at Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740."

 

MACDONALD'S REEL. See "Lord MacDonald('s Reel) [4]." Canadian, Shetland; Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. This reel was originally Scottish and imported to other areas, where the "Lord" part of the title was often dropped. Jarman (The Cornhuskers Book of Square Dance Tunes), 1944; pg. 15. Olympic 6151, The Shetland Fiddlers' Society ‑ "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978). Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier ‑ "The Dances Down Home" (1977).

 

MACDONALD’S REEL [2].  AKA and see "Charlie, If You Would Only Come,“ “Charlie’s Welcome [2],” “Flora MacDonald,” “Miss Flora McDonald’s Reel,” “Miss Macdonald’s (Reel) [4],” “Thearlaich! Nan Tigeadh Tu [1].” Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody appears under this title in the 1770 music manuscript of Northumbrian musician William Vickers, about whom unfortunately nothing is known.

X:1

T:MacDonald’s Reel [2]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:William Vickers’ music manuscripts (Northumberland, 1770)

K:D

D|E2 EF BEEF|E2 EF dFDF|E2 EF EFGA|Bc/d/ AF dDD:|

|:F|Eeef eEEF|Eeef dDDF|Eeed Bcde|fg/a/ ec dDD:|

 

MACDONNELL'S MARCH (Mairseail Alasdroin). AKA and see "MacAlisdrum's March."

 

MACDOUGALLS (POLKA), THE. Canadian, Polka. A Major ('A' part) & E Major ('B' part). Standard tuning. AABB. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 58. Fretless Records 132, "Ron West: Vermont Fiddler." RCA Victor LCP 1001, Ned Landry and his New Brunswick Lumberjacks ‑ "Bowing the Strings with Ned Landry."

X:1

T:Macdougall's Polka

R:Polka

M:4/4

L:1/8

Z:Transcribed by Bruce Osborne

K:A

E2|AAEA c2Ac|eece a3e|g2f2 fede|f2e2 edcB|

AAEA c2Ac|eece a3e|g2f2 edcB|A2c2 A2:|

K:E

GA|B2g2 g3B|A2f2 f3e|e2d2 d2A2|c2B2 BAGA|

B2g2 g3B|A2f2 f3e|e2d2 a2d2|e4 e2:|

 

MACDOUGALL'S JIG. Scottish, Jig. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 140, pg. 179.

 

MAC EOGHAN SHEAIN AGUS INION JOHN CHIT. Polka.

 


MACFARLANE'S RANT. See “MacFarlane’s Reel [1].”

MACFARLANE'S REEL [1]. AKA – “MacFarlane’s Rant.” Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AB (Surenne): AABB (Stewart-Robertson): AABBCDE (McGlashan). The melody appears in the 1734 Drummond Castle Manuscript (in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle), inscribed "A Collection of the best Highland Reels written by David Young, W.M. & Accomptant.” McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 17. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 105 (appears as “MacFarlane’s Rant”). Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852; pg. 43 (appears as “The M’Farlane Rant”).

X:1

T:MacFarlane’s Reel

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:McGlashan – Reels (c. 1786)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D
e|fA AA/A/ e>dBe|fA A/A/A e2 de|fA A/A/A e>dBg|aefd e2d:|

|:e|fdfd e>dBe|fdfd e2 de|fdfd e>dBg|a>efd e2 d:|

g|b/a/g/f/ gd BGGB|c>AB>G A>GEg|b/a/g/f/ gd BGGB|c>Ad>B G/G/G Gg||

b/a/g/f/ gd B>GGB|c>aB>g A>GEg|b/a/g/f/ gd B>GGB|c>Ad>B G/G/G G||

g|dgg>e dgb>a|g>edB A>GEA|Ggge dgb>a|g>ed>B G/G/G Gg|Ggg>e dgb>a|

ge/g/ dB/d/ A>GEg/a/|b/a/g a/g/e dg/a/b>a|gedB G/G/G G2||

X:2

T:MacFarlane’s Rant

L:1/8

M:C|

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

K:D

e|fA A/A/A edBe|fA A/A/A e2de|fA A/A/A edBg|aefd e2d:|

|:e|fdfd edBe|eded e2de|fdfd edBg|aefd e2d:|

 

MACFARLANES (REEL) [2], THE. Scottish, Reel. Composed by Pipe Major Donald MacLeod. Piper Major Donald MacLeod Collection. Green Linnet GLCD1182, The Tannahill Weavers - “Choice Cuts 1987-1996.”

 

MACFOSSETT'S FAREWELL. AKA and see "MacPherson's Lament."

 

MACGILLAMUN'S ORAN MOR. Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). A Major. Standard tuning. AA. Composed by George MacIlwham, a piper and flautist with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 32.

 

MACGILLYCUDDY’S. Irish, Polka. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: learned from session musicians in Newmarket, County Cork [Sullivan]. Sullivan (Session Tunes), vol. 3; No. 42, pg. 18.

 

MACGREGOR O’ RUARI.  See “Mac Griogair a Ruaro.”

 

MACGREGOR JIG. AKA and see “The Inverness Jig [2],” “March of Donald Lord of the Isles to the Battle of Harlaw (1411),” “O’Reilly’s Jig,” “The Rover’s Return,” “The Victor’s Return.” PLP-1057, Joe Cormier - “The Cheticamp Connection Phase II” (1986).

 

MACGREGOR MURRAY IN THE CELTIC CHAIR.  Scottish, Air (whole time). D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by famed Inver, Perthshire, fiddler-composer Niel Gow (1727-1807). The Clan MacGregor chief in Gow’s time was John Murray of Lanrick, also known as John MacGregor Murray, who had strong connections with the Highland Society in Edinburgh and London. He served as a general in the East India Company’s army and as auditor-general of Bengal. He died in 1822, the same year he changed his name to MacGregor. He brought back from India an important piping manuscript written by Joseph MacDonald, a young piper who died there also in service to the Company. It was a study of piping at a time when it was in its early-modern phases, and still an aural and hereditary tradition. MacGregor Murray was a fluent native speaker of Gaelic, and held an interest in piping throughout his life. Gow (Sixth Collection of Strathspey Reels), 1822; pg. 36.

X:1

T:MacGregor Murray in the Celtic Chair

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slowly. Bold”

C:Niel Gow (1727-1807)

B:Gow – Sixth Collection of Strathspey Reels (1822)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A2 DF/G/ ADFA|G>=C C>E {F}(G2B2)|A2 DF/G/ ADFA|dD DF (A2.f2):||

d/e/f/g/ a>g fd f/g/a/f/|g=cce g2 a/g/f/e/|d/e/f/g/ a/b/a/g/ fd f/g/a/f/|a/g/f/e/ d/e/f/g/ a2 a/g/f/e/|

d/e/f/g/ a/b/a/f/|g/a/g/e/ f/g/f/d/|e/=f/g/e/ =c/d/e/f/ g/f/e/f/ g/^f/g/e/|f/g/a/f/ e/f/g/e/ d/e/f/d/ c/d/e/c/|dD DF (A2.f2)||

 

MACGREGOR’S GATHERING (Cruuinneach nan Griogarach). Scottish, Pipe Pibroch. The tune was copied by Alexander Campbell in 1815 for his book Albyn’s Anthology from Captain Neil McLeod of Gesto’s manuscript collection of pibrochs, as performed by the famous piping dynasty of the MacCrimmons of Skye. Clan Gregor claims descent from Grigar, third son of Kenneth MacAlpin, first king of Scotland.  Glenorchy was the clan’s original seat but as they prospered lands in Glengyle, Glen Lyon, Glen Straye and Balquidder came under their control. The clan’s prospects waned in response to increasing power of the Campbells, however, resulting in their retreat into the Balquidder area, and at one point they became known as “The landless clan.”

           

MACGREGGOR’S HIGHLAND FLING. Scottish (?), Highland Fling. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. White’s Unique Collection, 1896; No. 164, pg. 20.

X:1

T:MacGreggor’s Highland Fling

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Highland Fling

S:White’s Unique Collection (1896), No. 164

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D2 | G2 d>B G2 d>B | (c<A) (B>G) A>GF>D | G2 d>B G2 d>B | c>AG>F G2D2 |

G2 d>B G2 d>B | (c<A) (B>G) A>GF>D | G2 d>B G2 d>B | c>AG>F G2 ||

d2 | “tr”g2 (e>g) d>gB>g | “tr”g2 (f>g) a>fe>d | “tr”g2 e>g d>gB>g | e>c A>c (B<G) d2 |

“tr”g2 (e>g) d>gB>g | “tr”g2 (f>g) a>fe>d | “tr” g2 (e>g) d>gB>g | (e<c) (A>c) (B<G) ||

                       

MACGREGOR'S LAMENTATION. See "Mac Griogair a Ruaro."

           

MACGREGOR'S MARCH. AKA and see “Kit White’s No. 2,” “Maurice O’Keeffe’s [5]," “Rob Roy’s March.” Scottish, March (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Clan Gregor claims descent from Grigar, third son of Kenneth MacAlpin, first king of Scotland.  Glenorchy was the clan’s original seat but as they prospered lands in Glengyle, Glen Lyon, Glen Straye and Balquidder came under their control. The clan’s prospects waned in response to increasing power of the Campbells, however, resulting in their retreat into the Balquidder area, and at one point they became known as “The landless clan.” In Ireland the tune is set as a polka, called “Maurice O’Keefe’s” and “Kit White’s No. 2.” The song “Donal Don” from Ford's Vagabond Songs and Ballads of Scotland (1899 & 1901) uses the melody. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; No. 418, pg. 46.

X:1

T:MacGregor's March

S:Howard & Co's Melodion Tutor, London, n.d.

Z:Nigel Gatherer

N:Transposed from C for comparison

M:2/4

L:1/8

K:D

AA/B/ AA/B/|Ad d2|BB/c/ BB/c/|Be Bc|AA/B/ AA/B/|

Ad d2|Be Bc|d z d2::f2 f2|fB B2|

BB/c/ Bc|dA A2|f2 f2|fB B2|Be Bc|d z d2:|]

 

MACGREGOR'S SEARCH. Scottish. From Daniel Dow's "Ancient Scots Music." Dow was a teacher of music in Edinburgh in the 18th century. Tune associated with 'the landless clan', the MacGregors. Flying Fish FF358, Robin Williamson‑ "Legacy of the Scottish Harpers, vol. 1."

 

MAC GRIOGAIR A RUARO (Lamentation for MacGregor of Roro). AKA ‑ "MacGregor's Lamentation." Scottish, Slow Air and Waltz. A Major. Standard tuning. One part. From Daniel Dow's Ancient Scots Music. Clan Gregor claims descent from Grigar, third son of Kenneth MacAlpin, first king of Scotland.  Glenorchy was the clan’s original seat but as they prospered lands in Glengyle, Glen Lyon, Glen Straye and Balquidder came under their control. The clan’s prospects waned in response to increasing power of the Campbells, however, resulting in their retreat into the Balquidder area, and at one point they became known as “The landless clan.” Gow (1802) says: “Very slow with much expression.” Morison also indicates a slow tempo and says the composition is “Old”. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 594. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 2. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 153. Morison (Highland Airs and Quicksteps, vol. 2), c. 1882; No. 25, pg. 14. Flying Fish FF358, Robin Williamson, "Legacy of the Scottish Harpers, vol. 1" (appears as "MacGregor's Lamentation").

X:1

T:Lamentation for Mac Gregor of Roro

T:Mac Griogair a Ruaro

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

Q:80

S:MacDonald – Skye Collection   (1887)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

E>F|A2 A2 BA/B/|(c2E) z E>F|A2 ~A2 {c}B(A/B/)|(c2E2) (A,/C/E)|c2 ~c2 e>c|

B2A2F2|E2 C>B,CE|F2 A,z E>F|A2A2 BA/B/|(c2E2) ~E>F|A2A2 BA/B/|

c2 E2 (A,/C/E/A/)|c2 ~c2 {c}e>c|{c}B2 A2 A>F|(E2C2) E>C|B,2 A,2||

X:2

T:Macgregor o’ Ruari

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow”

S:Morison – Highland Airs and Quicksteps, vol. 2 (c. 1882)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

EF | A2A2 BA/B/ | c2E2 EE | A2A2 BA/B/ | c2E2 A,/>C/E | c2c2 e>c |

{c}B2A2E2 | E2 CB,CE | {E}F2A,2 EF | A2A2 BA/B/ | c2E2 EF |

A2A B{c/B/}A/B/ | c2E2 A,/C/E | c2c2 ec | {c}B2A2 AF | {F}E2C2 EC | (B,2A,2) ||

 

MACGUIRE’S KICK [1]. Irish, March (6/8 time). C Minor. Standard tuning. AB. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 409, pg. 103.

X:1

T:MacGuire’s Kick [1]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:March

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 409

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Cmin

B | cde f2g | {d/f/}e2d {B/d/}c2B | cde f2g | e3 c2B | cde f2g | {d/f/}e2d {B/d/}c2B |

BGF FGB | e2f g2 || e/c/ | BGF {E/G/}F2F | GFE {E/F/}E2G | BGF FGB | e2f gec |

BGF F2F | GFE E2G | BGF FGB | “tr”c3 e2 ||

 


MACGUIRE’S KICK [2]. Irish, March (6/8 time). G Minor. Standard tuning. AB. Petrie notes this is “The rebels’ march in 1798" [Stanford/Petrie], referring to the rebellion by the largely Catholic Irish against the occupying English in that year. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 410, pg. 104.

X:1

T:MacGuire’s Kick [1]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:March

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 410

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Gmin
B/>F/ | D2C C>B,C | D2B, B,A,B, | D2C CDF | ~B2c dBF | D2C C>B,C |

D2B, B,>A,B, | D2C CD~F | G3B2 || F | (FG)B c2d | {c}B2A G2F |

(FG)B c2d | B3 G2F | (FG)B c>Bc | dBG GFD | FDC CDF | B3 (dB)F |

D2C CB,C | D2B, B,A,B, | D2C CDF | “tr”B2c dBF |

D2C CB,C | D2B, B,2D | F>DC (CD)F | ~G3 B2 ||

 

MACHINE WITHOUT HORSES, THE. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. G Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 207, pg. 80.

 

MACHYNLLETH.  Welsh. From Robin Huw Bowen's Blodau'r Grug.

 

MACINTOSH OF MACINTOSH. AKA and see “The Bridge of Inver." Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by James MacIntosh. James Macintosh (1791-1879) was, according to J. Murray Neil (The Scots Fiddle, 1991), a member of a musical family that produced six skilled fiddlers in three generations. James’ father was a contemporary, friend and neighbour of the famous Scots fiddler Niel Gow’s in Inver, Dunkeld, Perthshire, and played in the latter’s band. James and his brother Charles took lessons from Niel and remained close to the family. James attempted a career as a joiner, explains J. Murray Neil, but, when invited to Edinburgh by the Gow sons to play in their band (the ‘Reel players of Scotland’, a celebrated string band of up to 20 skilled musicians), he at once departed for the city. In addition to his professional playing, Macintosh established a reputation as a music teacher in Edinburgh and had several compositions printed by Lowe (1844) and later Kerr. Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 129.

X:1

T:MacIntosh of MacIntosh

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:MacDonald – Skye Collection  (1887)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bb

d|B2 FE DB,B,D|ECCE DFFA|B2 FE (DF)BF|GEcA B2B:|

f|dBdf gabg|fdcB Acce|dBdf gabg|fdec B2 Bf|

dBdf gabg|fdcB Accd|BGFE DFBF|GEcA B2B||

                       

MACINTOSH’S LAMENT.  See “McIntosh’s Lament.”

 

MACINTYRE’S FAREWELL [1].  Scottish, Air (whole time). G Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. “By Himself” (Gow). Duncan MacIntyre (c. 1765-1807) was a contemporary of publisher, composer and performer Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831). Several of his tunes appear in the later Gow collections.  Gow (Sixth Collection of Strathspey Reels), 1822; pg. 36.

X:1

T:MacIntyre’s Farewell [1]

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow”

C:”By Himself” (Gow)

B:Gow – Sixth Collection of Strathspey Reels (1822)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Gmin

d|(BG) ~G.A .G/.A/.B/.c/ .d/.=e/.^f/.g/|d>e c>d BFFd|(BG) ~G>A .G/.A/.B/.c/ .d/.=e/.^f/.g/|d>e c>d BGG:||

g>a {ga}bg (d<g) B2|(A<c)c>d BFFd|”tr”g>a bg d<g B2|(A<d)cd BGGd|

”tr”g>a {ga}bg (d<g) B2|(A<c)c>d BFFd|B<G (G/B/)(A/c/) B>d c>e|d<b “tr”c>d BGG||

 

MACINTYRE’S FAREWELL [2]. Canadian, Pipe March (2/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by piper Barry W. Shears in memorium of Duncan MacIntyre, Amherst, formerly of French Road, Cape Breton. Shears (Gathering of the Clans Collection, vol. 1), 1986; pg. 35.

           

MACISSAC’S REEL. AKA and see “John o’ Badenyond,” “Old Time Wedding Reel [1].”

                       

MACIVAR'S. Scottish, Strathspey. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB'. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 2; No. 86, pg. 12.

X:1

T:MacIvar’s

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

B:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 2, No. 86  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

c|G<EE>c G<EE>c|G<Ec>E D3c|G<EE>G c>de>d|c>AG>E D3:|

|e|c(e/f/g>)e c<ge<a|g<cg>e d2 (d>e)|c(e/f/ g>)e c<ge>d|c<A c>E D3e|

c(e/f/g>)e c<ge<a|g<cg>e d2 (d>e)|g>ef>d e>c d>B|c<A G>E D3||

 

MACKENNA'S DREAM. AKA and see "Captain Rock(e's) [1]," "John Doe," "The Grand Conversation of Napoleon," "Greenfields of America [1]," "Pretty Molly Bralligan," "Molly Brallaghan [1]." Irish, Air (4/4 time). D Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AB. "The air of this song, which I remember from my childhood, was otherwise called 'John Doe,' and also 'The Grand Conversation', from a song about Napoleon, of which every verse ended in this, which is the only verse I remember:‑‑

***

As Mars and Apollo were viewing some implements,

Bellona stepped forward and asked them what news;

Or were they preparing those warlike fine instruments

That had been got rusty for the want of being used.

The actions of Napoleon that made the money fly about,

Until the powers of Europe they did him depose;

But the All‑Seeing Eye would not let him run through the world:

This grand conversation was under the rose.

***

The air may be compared with two others:‑‑  'The Greenfields of America' and 'Purty (Pretty) Molly Brallagan.' All are evidently varied forms of the same original; but this‑‑which has not been printed until now‑‑is by far the finest of the group. The words of MacKenn'a Dream, in their original form, as they came from MacKenna's own brain, and as I give them here, have not been hitherto published. But a version is given in 'Ballads, Popular Poetry and Household Songs,' by 'Duncathail,' with much literary polishing up; and this, with some further literary alterations, is published by Mr. Halliday Sparling in his 'Irish Minstrelsy'. But somehow when these simple old peasant songs are altered in this manner, they are seldom improved; and they always lose the fresh racy flavour. I have taken my version, partly from memory, and partly from a ballad‑sheet copy in my collection, printed in Cork some seventy years ago. But I have other and later printed ballad‑sheet copies with some differences, and all much corrupted. MacKenna, in his vision, sees advance many historical Irish warriors and patriots, from Brian Boru down to the heroes of Ninety‑eight" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 373, pgs. 176‑178.

X:1

T:MacKenna’s Dream

T:Captain Rock

L:1/8

M:C

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs  (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

AG|FD FG AG E C2|D2 DD GE =CD|FE FG A2 GE|E2 DD D3E|FE FG AG EC|

D2 DD GE =C2 D|FE FG A2 GE|E2 DD D3||D|DE FG AG AB|=cB cA GE D>C|

DE FG AB =cA|dB GB A2 (3ABc|d2 ec dc AG|FE FD E D2 =C>D|

FE FG A2 GE|E2 DD D2||

                       

MACKENZIE AND MACPHEE. American, Reel. Composed by fiddler Frank Ferrel in honor of two of Cape Breton’s most famous musicians, fiddler Carl Mackenzie and pianist Doug MacPhee. Flying Fish FF70572, Frank Ferrel – “Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England” (1991).

                       

MACKENZIE FRASER. Scottish. Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner “The Starthspey King.”

                       

MACKENZIE HAY. Scottish, Strathspey. D Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, who recorded it himself on a wax cylinder in London in 1906. MacKenzie Hay, to who the tune was dedicated, was the President of the Highland Strathspey and Reel Society in London. Cape Breton fiddler Bill Lamey recorded the tune (in medley with Skinner’s “Kirrie Kebbuck”) on 78 RPM. Source for notated version: fiddler Jean-Ann Callender (Aberdeen) [Martin]. Cranford (Jerry Holland: The Second Collection), 2000; No. 116, pg. 45. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 2, 1988; pg. 20. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 129. Beltona 78 RPM 2313, Jimmy Shand. Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner “The Starthspey King.”

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources

X: 1
T: MacKenzie Hay
C: J.S.Skinner
R: strathspey
B: Christine Martin "Ceol na Fidhle" v.2 p.15 1988
D: J.S.Skinner 1906 (wax cylinder)
Z: 2008 John Chambers <jc:trillian.mit.edu>
M: C
L: 1/8
K: D
G \
| "D"F<D F>A {c}d2 d>f | "A"e>c "E"d>B "A"c<A A>=c \
| "G"B<G d>B "D"A2 F>D | "A"E>A "E7"^G>B "A"(3ABA "A7"=GFE |
y2 \
| "D"F<D F>A {c}d2 d>f | "A"e>c "E"d>B "A"c<A A>=c \
| "G"(3BGB (3dcB "D"(3Afe (3dcB | "A7"(3ABA (3GFE "D"F<D D |]
g \
| "D"f<d "A7"g>e "(D)"{^g}a2 "D"f>d | "A"e>c "E7"d>B "A"c<A "A7"A>g \
| "D"f>d "A"g>e "D"a>f "G"b>g | "D"a>f "A"g>e "D"f<d d>g |
y2 \
| "D"f<d "A7"g>e "(D)"{^g}a2 "D"f>d | "A"e>c "E7"d>B "A"c<A "A7"A>=c \
| "G"(3BGB (3dcB "D"(3Aag (3fed | "A7"(3cBA (3GFE "D"F<D D |]

 

MACKENZIE HIGHLANDERS. Scottish, March (2/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB’. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 4, 1991; pg. 34.

                       

MACKENZIE'S FAREWELL. See "Mackenzie's Farewell to Sutherland."


                       

MACKENZIE’S FAREWELL TO ROSS-SHIRE. Scottish, March (2/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB’. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 4, 1991; pg. 34.

                       

MACKENZIE'S FAREWELL TO SUTHERLAND. AKA - "Mackenzie's Farewell." Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). D Major. Standard. AABB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; No. 5, pg. 47 (appears as "Mackenzie's Farewell"). Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 1, 1991; pg. 8.

 

MACKENZIE'S RANT. Scottish, Strathspey. A Dorian. Standard. AAB (Cranford): AABB' (Kerr, Stewart-Robertson). The tune appears first in print in Niel Gow’s 2nd Repository (Edinburgh, 1788). The MacKenzies were a very powerful clan in the north of Scotland, who had many subordinate tribes who followed their banner. A gathering signal of the MacKenzie’s was a beacon fire on the Tullorh ard, or high hilloch.  Then the Croishtaraidh, or fiery cross, was sent through every strath and glen to warn of impending danger and to rouse and summon the inhabitants for action. The fiery hill was incorporated into the crest of the family of Seaforth (where it is often mistaken for a volcano), along with the motto Luceo non uro (“I englighten, I do not burn”). Cranford (Jerry Holland’s), 1995; No. 35, pg. 10. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 22. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 2; No. 59, pg. 9. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 47. Fiddlesticks cass., Jerry Holland - “A Session with Jerry Holland” (1990).

X:1

T:MacKenzie’s Rant

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Minor

e|A<A c>d e>A c>e|G<G B>A G2 G|A<A c>d e>Ac>e|a>e g>B A2A:|

e|c>BA>^g a<e g>B|GGB>A G2 G>B|c>B Af/^g/ a>eg>B|a>egB A2 A>e|

c>BA>^g a>eg>B|G<G B>A G>AB>G|A>Bc>e d>eg>a|g<e g>B A2A||

 

MACKILMOYLE REEL. AKA and see "Galop de Malbie," “Galope de la Mal Baie.” French Canadian, New England; Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. A popular dance tune in Eastern Canada and New England. Amherst, Mass., fiddler Donna Hebert (Hinds, 1981) related that the late Ontario fiddler Graham Townsend said Joe Bouchard of Canada probably wrote the tune, however, this is may not be entirely true given the relationship between this tune and the south-west Virginia-collected “Folding Down the Sheets,” a similar tune especially in the ‘B’ parts. “Folding Down the Sheets” dates back to at least the middle of the second half of the 19th century. There are two versions of  “The Mackilmoyle” tune extent; one treats the first four notes of the tune as the pickup notes to a first measure, the other treats them as the beginning of the tune. Seattle accordion player Laurie Andres (according to Clyde Curley in The Portland Collection) believes the confusion came about because of the similarity to the tune “Galope de la Mal Baie.” “Galop begins on the downbeat, while “Mackilmoyle” begins on the upbeat. Sources for notated versions: ‘Down-East’ fiddler Don Messer [Hinds/Hébert]; Donna Hébert [Hart & Sandell]. Hart & Sandell (Dance ce Soir), 2001; No. 26, pg. 57. Hinds/Hébert (Grumbling Old Woman), 1981; pg. 13. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 25. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 45, pg. 31. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 150. Sannella, Balance and Swing (CDSS). Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 128. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 17. Fretless FR200, Yankee Ingenuity ‑ "Kitchen Junket" (1977). Rounder 7002, Graham Townsend, "Le Violon/ The Fiddle" (appears as "Galop de Malbaie").

X:1

T:Mackilmoyle Reel

M:C|

L:1/8

K:D

DFAd fdfd|cdec dBAF|DFA=c BGBG|FGAF E2FE|

DFAd fdfd|cdec dBAF|DFA=c BGBd|cdec d2d2:|

|:cdef gfg2|Ace^g aga2|Acef gfge|dfed cBA2|

cdef gfg2|Ace^g aga2|Acef gfge|cdec d2d2:|

 

MACKINNON WEDDING, THE. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler and composer Dan R. MacDonald (1911-1976). Cameron (Trip to Windsor), 1994; pg. 9.

 

MACKINNON'S BROOK [1]. Canadian, Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. Kate Dunlay and David Greenberg note that source Mary MacDonald made extensive use of droned strings throughout the tune. MacKinnon’s Brook is a place-name in Inverness County, Cape Breton. Source for notated version: fiddler Mary (Beaton) MacDonald (Cape Breton) [Dunaly & Greenberg, Dunlay & Reich]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 27. Dunlay & Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music of Cape Breton), 1986; pg. 34. Little (Scottish and Cape Breton Fiddle Music in New Hampshire), 1984; pg. 32. Shears (Gathering of the Clans Collection, vol. 1), 1986; pg. 41 (pipe setting). Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). DMP 6‑27‑1, Doug MacPhee‑ "Cape Breton Piano III." Kicking Mule 231, Cathie Whitesides – “Gems of Irish and Cape Breton Fiddling” (1983). Rounder 7011, "The Beatons of Mabou: Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton" (1978). Wendy Mac Isaac – “That’s What You Get.”

X:1

T:MacKinnon's Brook

M:C

L:1/8

Q:144

R:Strathspey

K:ADor

B|A/2A/2A A>G E/2E/2E E>D|E<GE>D C>DE>G|

A/2A/2A A>B c>d e<a|g>e d<B A2 A:|!

G|A/2A/2A A>B c>d e<a|g>d e<g d<g B<G|

A<AA>B c>d e<a|g>e d<B A2 A:|

 


MACKINNON’S BROOK [2]. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. E Dorian. Standard. AB. Dunlay and Greenberg (1996) suggest this reel may be related to “Clanranald [2]” in MacDonald’s Skye Collection. Source for notated version: Mary MacDonald (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 87. Rounder 7009, Doug MacPhee - “Cape Breton Piano” (1977). David Greenberg & Doug MacPhee – “Tunes Until Dawn.”

 

MACKINNON’S OTHER RANT. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. A Dorian. Standard. AAB. Dunlay & Greenberg (1996) report that master Cape Breton fiddler Buddy MacMaster often plays this tune paired with “MacKinnon’s Rant.” Source for notated version: Donald Angus Beaton (1912-1982, Mabou, Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 63. BSFC:PAD 105, Jerry Holland & Alasdair Fraser - “Scottish Fiddle Rally, Concert Highlights 1985-1995" (1996. Appears mistakenly as “Hamish the Carpenter”). DAB4-1985, Donald Angus Beaton - “A Musical Legacy” (1985. Appears as “Traditional A Minor Reel”). DAB-3, 26-1, Kinnon Beaton “Cape Breton Fiddle 1" (1982. Appears as 2nd “Traditional Reel” side 1). JAD-1, Jackie Dunn - “Dunn to a T” (1995. Appears as “Traditional Reel” in the “Thorn Bush” medley). Smithsonian Folkways Records, SFW CD 40507, The Beaton Family of Mabou – “Cape Breton Fiddle and Piano Music” (2004). 

 

MACKINNON'S RANT. AKA and see “Thro’ the World Wou’d I Gang Wi’ the Lad that Loves Me [2]." Canadian, Rant or Reel. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Dorian (Dunlay/MacMaster, Dunlay/Gillis, Perlman): A Mixolydian (Dunlay/MacDonald). Standard. AB (Dunlay/MacDonald): AAB (Dunlay/MacMaster, Dunlay/Gillis, Perlman). Paul Cranford suggests that “MacKinnon’s Rant” is related to the strathspey “Craig O’ Barns,” while John Shaw (in the booklet to Topic 12TS354) attributed it to the 18th century Scottish composer Robert MacKintosh. In the William Christie Collection (1820) the melody is printed under the title “Thro’ the World Wou’d I Gang Wi’ the Lad that Loves Me.” Sources for notated versions: Buddy MacMaster (Cape Breton) [Dunlay and Reich]; Alex Gillis and Mary MacDonald (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]; George MacPhee (b. 1941, Monticello, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music from Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 62. Dunlay and Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music from Cape Breton), 1986; pg. 44. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 89. Culburnie Records CUL 102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher – “The Driven Bow” (1988. From the playing of Buddy MacMaster). Decca 14024 (78 RPM), Alex Gillis‑ "The Inverness Serenaders" (c. 1930's). DMP 6‑27, Doug MacPhee‑ "Cape Breton Piano II" (1979. Appears as "Traditional Reel”). Sea-Cape Music ACR4-12940, Buddy MacMaster - “Judique on the Floor” (1989. Appears as “Traditional Reel”). Topic 12TS354, Mary MacDonald‑ "Cape Breton Scottish Fiddle" (1978. Appears as "Untitled" after “Crubach”). WMT002, Wendy MacIsaac – “That’s What You Get” (appears as “The Craig of Barns Reel”). WRCI-4772, Unity Gain U-1002, Dave MacIsaac - “Celtic Guitar” (1986. Appears after “The Mystery).

           

MACKINNON’S REEL. Scottish, Reel. John Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing of the tune in Robert Ross's 1780 collection (pg. 36).

           


MACKINTOSH’S LAMENT. Scottish, Pibroch (3/4 time, "very slow"). A Mixolydian (for fiddlers; it is played by pipers in the key of D). Scordatura (AEAC#). AABB'CCDDEEGGGGHHII. This pibroch (originally a bagpipe tune) was supposed to have been written in the year 1526; Johnson states it is still part of the pipe repertory today. It was one of the tunes Niel Gow played for Robert Burns when the latter visited him at his home in Dunkeld in October 1787.

***

Nigel Gatherer found the following passage in an old book called The Fiddle in Scotland (n.d.) by Alexander G. Murdoch, from an account by Peter Stewart, who accompanied Niel Gow during the Burns visit:

***

Arriving at Dunkeld, [Burns]...put up at the principal inn...[He] was
fortunate in making the acquaintance of Dr Stewart, an enthusiastic
amateur violin player. At the dinner table he quoted to his guests the
well-known local ditty-
.
     Dunkeld it is a little toon,
.        An' lies intil a howe;
.     An' if ye want a fiddler loon,
.        Spier ye for Niel Gow.
Burns expressed much delight at the proposal...a visit was at once
agreed to.
***
The greeting was a cordial one on both sides, and the meeting of Burns
and Gow - both geniuses of the first order in their respective lines -
was mutually worthy of each other. The magician of the bow gave them a
selection of north-country airs mostly of his own spirited composition.
The first tune was "Loch Erroch Side" which greatly delighted the poet,
who long afterwards wrote for the same melody his touching lyric "Oh,
stay, sweet warbling woodlark, stay!"

At Burns's request, Niel next gave them his pathetic "Lament for
Abercairney" and afterwards one of the best-known compositions in the
Highlands, "McIntosh's Lament". "Tullochgorum" was also duly honoured,
after which the whole party adjourned to the little old-fashioned inn
at Inver, where there was a famous deoch, or parting friendly drink.

***

Source for notated version: Macdonald's 1784 Highland Vocal Airs, pg. 40. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1984; No. 56, pgs. 134‑135. Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Donald MacDonell (1888-1967) - “Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art” (1993).

 

MACKINTOSHES REEL, THE. Scottish, Pipe Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB'. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 135, pg. 174.

 

MACK'S BREAKDOWN. Old‑Time, Breakdown. Named for fiddler Mack Blalock. Rounder 0175, James Bryan ‑ "Lookout Blues" (1983).

 

MACK’S HORNPIPE. Old-Time, Breakdown. B Flat Major. A version of “Niagara Hornpipe.”

 

MACK'S RAG. In the repertory of Buffalo Valley, Pa., region dance fiddler Ralph Sauers.

 

MACK’S RAMBLES. Irish, Polka. G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB’. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 84, pg. 32.

 

MACKWORTH. Scottish, Slow Strathspey. B Flat Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AB. Composed by J.S. Skinner. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 172 (arranged by J.M. Hunter). Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 140. Olympic 6151, Arthur Robertson ‑ "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

 

MACLACHLAN'S REEL. Scottish, Strathspey. C Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AAB. John Glen (1891) finds the earliest appearance of the tune in print in Angus Cumming's 1780 collection (pg. 16). Glen notes similarities with Henry Playford’s “Cronstoune”, printed in 1700. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Dance Music), vol. 1, 1891; pg. 11.

X:1

T:MacLachlan’s Reel

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey
S:Glen Collection, vol. 1 (1891)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

E>G G<c G/G/G c2|c>de>c d2 D2|(EGG)g e>gd>e|c>AG>E C/C/C C2:|

(G/F/E/D/) C>E G>Ac>G|A>cE>c d2 d>e|g>ec>g a>eg>d|e>cg>e c/c/c cg|

a>eg>d e>cg>e|fage d2 D2|(EGG)g e>gd>e|c>AG>E C/C/C C2||

 

MACLACHLAN'S RANT. Scottish, Strathspey. D Mixolydian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABBCC. John Glen (1891) finds the earliest appearance of the tune in print in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection (pg. 29). McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg. 18.

X:1

T:MacLachlan’s Rant

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:McGlashan – Strathspey Reels (c. 1780)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmix

A|F>EDg a/g/f/e/ fd|e/f/g f/g/a eEEA|F>EDg a/g/f/e/ fd|f/g/a e/e/f dDD:|

|:A|F>EDA D/D/D F>D|ECCE G/F/E/D/ CE|F>EDA D/D/D F>D|

ECCE G/F/E/D/ CE|F>EDA D/D/D FD|f/g/a e/e/f dDD:|

|:e|f>df>d f>df>d|ecce g/f/e/d/ ce|f>df>d f>df>d|f/g/a e/e/f dDD:|

 

MACLACHLAN'S SCOTS MEASURE. AKA ‑ "MacLauchlane's Scotch Measure." Scottish, Scottish Measure. D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. The melody appears in the McGlashan Collection of Scots Measures (late 18th century). Emmerson (1971) believes it likely that MacLachlan was a dancer or a musician, otherwise the honorific "Mr." would have been inserted in the title. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 152.

X:1

T:MacLauchlane’s Scotch Measure

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Country Dances

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

F>E|D2 DF EDEF|A2 (E2E2)F>E|D2 DF EDEF|AFED d2 d>e|

f>edf edBe|dBAF E2 F>E|DEFG ABdA|F2D2D2:|

|:f>d|d2a2 fgaf|b2 (e2e2)f>e|d2a2 fgab|agfe d2d>e|

f>edf e>dBe|dBAF E2 F>E|DEFG ABdA|F2D2D2:|

 


MACLAINE OF LOCH BUIE'S REEL. AKA and see: "The Highlander's Rant," "Greetings to the Beatons of Mabou," “Mabou Reel [2]," "MacLean of Loch Ban,” "Wildcat Reel" (a similar tune), “Willy McKenzie’s.” Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AAB. The melody appears in Ross’s Collection of Pipe Music (1885). Donald Angus Beaton (Mabou, Cape Breton) [Dunlay and Reich]. Dunlay and Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music of Cape Breton), 1986; pg. 40. Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Celtic 13 Rodeo (Banff) 1257, The MacLellan Trio‑ "The Music of Cape Breton" (appears as "Wildcat Reel"). Celtic CX11, John A. MacDonald‑ "Scottish Fiddling" (appears as "The Highlander's Reel"). DAB4‑1985, Donald Angus Beaton‑ "A Musical Legacy" (appears as "A Mabou Reel"). PLP4‑1012, Joe Cormier‑ "The Cheticamp Connection" (appears as "Greetings to the Beatons of Mabou"). Rounder 7003, John Campbell‑ "Cape Breton Violin Music" (appears as "Traditional Reel"). STEPH 1-94, Stephanie Wills - “Tradition Continued” (1994). University College of Cape Breton UCCBP 1007, Dan Joe MacInnis‑ "Celtic Music of Cape Breton, Vol. I" (various artists){appears as "MacLean of Loch Ban"}.

X:1

T:MacLaine of Loch Buie’s Reel

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Reel

K:Amix
e2 de AAAB | g2 fg BGBd | e2 de edea |1gedB BAAA :|2gedB A3 e :|
|: a2 ag aeef | gage fdcd | eaag aeea | gedB BAAA |
a2 ag aeef | gage fdcd | g2 ag geea | gedB A4 |:

 

MACLAUCHLANE'S SCOTCH MEASURE. AKA and see "MacLachlan's Scots Measure."

 

MACLEAN OF LOACH BAN. See "MacLaine of Loch Buie's Reel."

 

MACLEAN OF PENNYCROSS. Scottish, March. A Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB’CCDD’. Composed by Pipe Major A. Ferguson. Christine Martin (2002) says this Highland pipe march has crept into the North East fiddle tradition, albeit rendered with different bowings and style to West Coast Scottish playing. Source for notated version: the Inverness Fiddlers [Martin]. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 118. Olympic 6151, Arthur Robertson ‑ "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

 

MACLEAN SCOTS MEASURE. Scottish, Scottish Measure. The melody appears in the Blaikie MS., and the title is the earliest use of the term "Scots Measure" (Emmerson, 1971). There was a noted dancing master in Edinburgh named Maclean; Emmerson (1971) points out that 'Maclean' must have been a musician or dancer, otherwise the honorific "Mr." would have been inserted in the title.

 

MACLEAN'S FAVORITE. AKA and see “McLean’s Favorite.” Irish, Reel. E Minor ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard tuning (fiddle). AA'BB'. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 177. O’Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 579, pg. 106.

X:1

T:MacLean’s Favorite

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 579

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

gf|:edBA GABc|dGBG dGBe|edBA GABA|1 Beed efgf:|2 Beed e2||

e2|defg afdf|faec BAFE|Aceg a2 ae|gbeg afec|

Aceg a2 ae|faec BAFE|Aceg a2 ge|fefg agaf||

 

MACLEAN’S WELCOME.  See “Come Over the Stream to Charlie.”

 

MACLEOD OF MACLEOD’S CHORUS SONG (Luinneag Mhic Leoid). Scottish, Air (6/8 time). D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. “This is another of the genuine compositions of M’Leod’s female bard, formerly mentioned, and patronimically called, Mairi nighean Alastair Ruaidh, being a lullaby to her patron Sir Roderick.” Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 65, pg. 23.

X:1

T:Macleod of Macleod’s Chorus Song

T:Luinneag Mhic Leoid

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

S:Fraser Collection  (1874)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

(3d/4c/4B/4|A2D F2A|F2E F2 (3d/c/B/|A2D F2A|E2D D2 (3d/c/B/|

A2D F2A|F>(G/F/E/) F2A|d>ef F2A|[C2E2][DF][D2F2]:|

|:A,|D>EF (G>FG)|AGF G>AB|(B>A)d A>G/(F/G/)|AFD E2 (D/A,/)|
D>EF (G>FG)|AGF G>A z/B/|B>Ad A>G/(F/G/)|AA,D (E2 D/)||

 

MACLEOD OF MULL. Scottish, March (6/8 time). B Minor. Standard tuning. AABB'CC'. Composed by Pipe Major D. MacLeod. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 1, 1991; pg. 22.

 

MACLEOD'S DAUGHTER (Nighean Thormaid). Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Minor. Standard tuning. ABCD. "There are words of various merit to this air, often imperfectly sung. Those which bear the name given in this work suit it best, and relate to some occasion the Macleod family had for recruiting men, when the heir was a minor, and a lady the active instrument. The words profess the warmest attachment to her and the family interests" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 65, pg. 23.

X:1

T:Macleod’s Daughter

T:Nighean Thormaid

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

S:Fraser Collection  (1874)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Gmin

A|B>AG>^F d2 =F2|F<B D>=E F3A|B>AG>^F d2 F2|G<B D>^F G3A|

B>AG>^F d3 ^f|g>b=f>g d>fcd|B>ABc d>BA>c|B>GA>^F G2 G||A|

B<G G>^F d3 g/4^f/4g/4a/4|b>ag>=f d2 cB|c>=Bc>e d>_Bc>A|

B>GA^F G2 GA|B<G G>^F d3 g/4^f/4g/4a/4|b>ag>=f d2 cB|c>=Bce dg f/e/d/c/|

B>GA>^F G3||A|B>AG>^F d2 =F2|F<B D>=E F3A|B>AG>^F d2F2|

G<B D>^F G3A|B>AG>^F d3^f|g>b=f>g d>fcd|B>AB>c d>BA>c|B>GA>^F G2G||

b/a/|g>fd>e f<b d>e|f>d B/c/d/e/ (f2 f)b/a/|g>fd>e f<b d>c|

B>d c/=B/c/d/ e>(3g/4f/4e/4 d>e|d>cB>c d<f F2|F<B D>=E F3A|

G>AB>c d>Bc>A|B>GA>^F G2G||

 

MACLEOD'S FAREWELL. Scottish, Composed by D. Shaw. Green Linnet SIF‑1094, Capercaillie ‑ "Sidewaulk" (1991).

 

MACLEOD’S QUICKSTEP. Scottish, March (2/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Scots fiddler-composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904; pg. 45.

X:1

T:MacLeod’s Quickstep

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:March

C:J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927)

S:Skinner – Harp and Claymore (1904)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Mix

.c/.B/ | Ac/e/ ag/a/ | ({a}f)e/c/ ({c}e2) | fe/c/ eA | gG B/c/d/B/ | Ac/e/ ag/a/ | fe/c/ ({c}e2) |

d/c/B/A/ gB/d/ | ({d}e)(AA) :: A | aA c/d/e/A/ | ee/c/ ({c}e2) | fe/c/ eA | gG B/c/d/B/ |

aA c/d/e/A/ | fe/c/ ({c}ea | d/c/B/A/ “tr”gB/d/ | ({c}e)(AA) :|

 

MACLEOD'S REEL [1]. AKA and see "Miss McLeod's/MacLeod's Reel [1]."

 

MACLEOD’S REEL [2]. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg. 8.

X:1

T:MacLeod’s Reel

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:McGlashan – Strathspey Reels (c. 1780)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

B|A>BAF A>BdB|AfdF E/E/E B2|A>FD>F A/A/A a>g|f>def d/d/d d:|

f/g/|a>fd>f a>gf>d|g>bf>a e/e/e ef/g/|a>fdf a>baf|g>ea>f d/d/d df/g/|

a>fd>f d>AF>D|F>Ad>F E/E/E B2|F>AG>B F>AD>g|f>def d/d/d d||

 


MACLELLANS’ STRATHSPEY, THE. Canadian, Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. A Major. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler Dan R. MacDonald (1911-1976). Cameron (Trip to Windsor), 1994; pg. 4.

                                   

MACMAHON'S HORNPIPE. Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Miller & Perron (Traditional Irish Fiddle Music), 1977; vol. 2, No. 32. Leader LER 2086, "The Boys of the Lough."

                                   

MACMURRAY OF AUCHIMEYERS REEL. Scottish (?), Reel. F Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: the music manuscript book of Ellis Knowles, a musician from Radcliffe, Lancashire, England, written c. 1845-1847 [Plain Brown]. Plain Brown Tune Book, 1997; pg. 13.

X:1

T:Mac Murray of Auchimeyers Reel

M:C|

L:1/8

K:F

B | A/B/c fc dcfc | A/B/c fc dcdf | A/B/c fc cf/g/ ag | fdcA F3 :|

|: A/B/ | cFAF cFBd | cF d/c/B/A/ G3 A/B/ | cFAF faga | fdcA F2 :|

                                   

MACMURROUGH, THE. Scottish?, Jig. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Harding’s All Round Collection, 1905; No. 60, pg. 18.

X:1

T:MacMurrough, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

B:Harding’s All-Round Collection, No. 60  (1905)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

G|cGE Cce|dBG Gdf|edc gfe|e3 d2G|cGE Cce|

dBG Gdf|ege fdB|(d3 c)z::e|gec ceg|afc cfa|gec gec|

e3 d2e|gec ceg|afc cfa|gec GAB|(d3 c)z:|

                                   

MACNAMARA’S JIG, THE. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. A Major. Standard tuning. AA;BB. Composed by fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia). Cranford (Brenda Stubbert’s), 1994; No. 86, pg. 32.

                                   

MACNEILS OF UGADALE, THE. Canadian, March (6/8 time). Canada, Cape Breton. Composed by John M. MacKenzie. Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993).

X:1
T:MACNEILS OF UGADALE
R:march
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:Hp
a|c>dB A2A|c<ee e>cA|f>ec e>fa|a>ec B2a|!
c>dB A2A|c<ee e>cA|c<dB e>fc|A3 A2:||!
e|a>gf e2a|e>fe e3/2c/A|a>gf e2a|a>ec B2e|!
a>gf e2a|e>fe e3/2c/A|c<dB e>fc|A3 A2e|!
a>gf e2a|e>fe e3/2c/A|a>gf e2a|a>ec B2a|!
c>dB A2A|c<ee e>cA|c<dB e>fc|A3 A2||!
a|c3 A3|c<ee e3/2c/A|f3 d2a|a>ec B2a|!
c3 A3|c<ee e3/2c/A|c<dB e>fc|A3 A2 :||!
e|f2a d2a|e>fe e>cA|f2a d2a|a>ec B2e|!
f2a d2a|e>fe e>cA|c>dB e>fc|A3 A2e|!
f2a d2a|e>fe e>cA|f2a d2a|a>ec B2a|!
c<dB e>fc|a>gf e2a|c<dB e>fc|A3 ||

                                   

MACPADDIN’S FAVORITE. AKA and see “The Priests Leap [1].”

                                   

MACPHERSON OF STRATHMASHY (Strath-Mhathaisidh). Scottish, Slow Strathspey. E Flat Major. Standard tuning. AB. "The editor never heard, but from his father, this choice air, to which he could sing but one verse, by MacPherson of Strathmashy. The world is so much and so unconsciously indebted to this gentleman's recitations of Ossian, and urging his friend to the publication of that celebrated work, that every memorial of him is worthy of preservation. The genuine humour of many of his songs, requiring an astonishing rapidity of utterance, by being associated with several strathspeys and reels now in circulation, and known as his composition, would entitle him to this notice, were his merits otherwise less" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 216, pg. 89.

X:1

T:Macpherson of Strathmashy

T:Strath-Mhathaisidh

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Fraser Collection  (1874)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C Minor

e|B>GG>F E>C C<E|B,<G, E>G, B,3 e|B<G G>F E>C C<E|=B,<G, G>B, C2 C<e|

B<G G>F E>C C<E|B,<G, E>G, B,3e|B>GG>F E>C D<G|=B,<G, G>B, (C2C)||

G|c>de>^f g>GG>=A|B<e G>_A B2 (3Bed|c>de>^f g>GG>c|G<c d>B c2 cd|

~e>fg>e f<d b>d|B<G e>G B2 Ba|g>fe>d c>de>g|G<c d>B c2c||

 

MACPHERSON'S BLADE. Scottish, Marching Air. E Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, first appearing in his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 41.

 

MACPHERSON’S CAVE.  Scottish, Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Skinner (Harp and Claymore Collection), 1904; pg. 17.

X:1

T:MacPherson’s Cave

M:C

L:1/8

C:J. Scott Skinner

R:”Pastoral” Air

N:”Fiercely”

Q:112

S:Skinner – Harp and Claymore (1904)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

({^e}f2) .F/.G/.A/.B/ cC .F2 | d>cBA GF ^Ec | ({g}a2) A/B/c/d/ eEAc | fg/a/ g({g}a) f2f :|

c | (fg/a/) g({b}a) f2 f>B | (ef/g/) fg e2 e>c | (fg/a/) g({b}a) f/g/a/f/ c’c | f/c/A/F/ c^e f2 f>c |

(fg/a/) g({b}a) f2 f>B | (ef/g/) fg e2 ef/g/ | (a/g/).f/.e/ ({g}aA B/c/d/B/ c^e | f/c/A/F/ cC F2F ||

 

MACPHERSON'S FAREWELL. See "Macpherson's Lament." An alternate title for “MacPherson’s Lament.” "M'Pherson's Farewell" is the title poet Robert Burns's used in his famous reworking of the traditional verses.

 


MACPHERSON'S LAMENT. AKA and see "Antarctic Ice," "Macpherson's Rant," "Macpherson's Farewell," "McFarsance's Tes(ta)ment," "MacFossett's Farewell," "The Freebooter." Scottish (originally), English; Air, Country Dance or Lament. England, Northumberland. F Major (Gow, Neil): G Major (Hardie, Johnson, McGibbon, Skinner): D Major (Lerwick): A Major (Carlin). Standard tuning. AB (Skinner): AAB (Johnson): ABCD (Hardie): AABBCCDD (Gow, McGibbon, Neil): ABCDEF (Lerwick). Though there is no proof, the melody is popularly thought to have been composed by one of Scotland's first so called fiddle composers, the legendary James Macpherson, "on the eve of execution, by Himself, 1700" (Skinner). It appears in a manuscript by an anonymous publisher, c. 1730, under the title "MacFossett's Farewell," and, still earlier, in the Margaret Sinkler Manuscript (1710) under the title "McFarsance's Tes(ta)ment." MacPherson was born in Banffshire about 1675, the son, it is said, of a beautiful gypsy woman and a Highland laird, MacPherson of Invershire, Inverness‑shire. He was raised by his father who unfortunately died young, at which time he went to live with his mother (whose good looks he had inherited, though perhaps he acquired his immense physical presence and strength from his father).  As MacPherson grew to adulthood he was lured to the wilder life and became the leader of a lawless gypsy roving band, and he developed a reputation as a freebooter who operated in the counties of Aberdeen, Banff and Moray.  Highwaymen were not rare in Scotland, and once he was captured and condemned it is likely he would have been forgotten, but MacPherson insured his lasting fame with a grand gesture on the cold November morning of his execution (11/7/1700) on the scaffold at Market Cross in Banff. 

***

Though various legends differ in the details the main thread has MacPherson, with his fiddle in his hand, stepping onto the platform whereupon he took up his bow and proceeded to play his last communication to the world, his rant (or sometimes three tunes: "MacPherson's Rant," "MacPherson's  Pibroch" and "MacPherson's Farewell"). At the conclusion of his performance he offered his violin to the assembled spectators (or, as one version goes, "to anyone in the crowd who would think well of him"), but either no one was brave enough to take it from the hands of a condemned man, or he had no well-wishers in attendance, or no one wished to implicate themselves by receiving the instrument. He looked around scornfully, lifted the fiddle and broke it over his knee in a grand gesture of contempt, though (as if the shattering were not dramatic enough) some versions have him dashing the instrument over the head of his executioner and flinging himself headlong off the scaffold and into oblivion.  At least one version has him throwing the pieces of the instrument into his awaiting grave, though the broken remains of the fiddle he supposedly played that day can be seen in the Macpherson Clan Museum at Newtonmore.

***

It seems the best legends are those that embroider true facts, and that a freebooter named MacPherson was hanged in Banff in 1700 is a matter of record.  It is a matter of belief, however, that he composed and played the rant which now bears his name. Alburger (1983) finds that there is no contemporary evidence that the outlaw was a fiddler, much less a composer:

***

Turning to the trial records, published in 1846, one finds this sole reference

to MacPherson and anything musical: 'M'Pherson...wes one night in the

house at that tyme, and drunk with the res, and danced all night.' The only

musician mentioned in this account is Peter Broune, who 'went sometymes

to Elchies, and played on the wiol' and 'got money sometyms for playing on

the wiol...' (He may have been one of the 'Browns of Kincardine' referred to

later in this chapter as early strathspey players and composers.)  Nor is the

earliest broadside helpful. 'The Last Words of James Macpherson, Murderer',

printed about 1705, contains nothing about the dramatic gesture with which

he is thought to have ended his life, and nothing about fiddling. Apparently

there is a later version, which adds to the title the words 'To its own proper

tune'. It is quite likely that the tune was written after the event to suit the

broadside, for it fits the words perfectly...It may be that over the years

tradtional memory fused MacPherson's story with the musical facts about

Peter Broune, who was on trial at the same time.

***

There is another legend also connected with the execution which states that the local powers that were, being cognisant that a reprieve was on the way, moved the town clock ahead one hour so that it would arrive only after the hanging. Neil (1991) reports that the magistrates of the town were punished for this perfidious act for many years in that they were forced to keep the town clock 20 minutes behind the right time, and remarks that even to this day jests are still made about the veracity of the time in Banff. Collinson (1966, pgs. 210‑211) also gives a similar thorough treatment of the legend of the highwayman and his melody.

***

The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. Robert Burns also wrote a famous song to the tune, called "MacPherson's Farewell," which begins

***

Farewell, ye dungeons dark and strong,

The wretch's destinie!

MacPherson's time will not be long

On yonder gallows‑tree.

Sae rantingly, sae wantonly,

Sae dauntingly gaed he,

He play'd a spring, and danc'd it round

Below the gallows‑tree.

***

D.K. Wilgus, in his article "The Hanged Fiddler Legend in Anglo-American Tradition," finds evidence of an earlier MacPherson in Ireland with an almost identical story. He cites a chapbook called The Lives and Actions of the Most Notorioius Irish Highwaymen Tories and Rapparees, from Redmond O'Hanlon to Cahier Na Gappul, printed in Dublin in the early 19th century which contains a section entitled "Some Passages of the Life of Strong John Macpherson, a notorious Robber."  The chapbook relates that the Irish highwayman, at the age of nineteen inherited:

***

A pretty little incomeĽwhich he made a shift to spend in the company of

pert women and gamesters, in less than three years, during which he was

always a leading man at hurlings, patrons, and matches of foot-ballĽHe

was accounted in his time the strongest man in the nation; he could hold

a hundred weight at arms' length in one hand, and would make little or

nothing of twisting a new horse-shoe round like a gad; yet nothwithstanding

all this activity he was soon reduced to poverty, and so, from one step after

another, brought to the gallowsĽHe was never known to murder anybody;

nay he was very cautious of striking unless in his own defence; though in

his time he committed more robberies single handed by far than Redmond

O'Hanlon did, with whom he was acquainted, but with none of his gang.

However, he was at last taken by treachery, and after being tried and found

Guilty was despatched by the common finisher of the law about 1678. As

he was carried to the gallows, he played a fine tune of his own composing

on the bagpipe, which retains the name of Macpherson's tune to this day.

***

Source for notated version: Dr. John Turner, director of the Jink and Diddle School of Scottish Fiddling, held yearly in Valle Crucis, North Carolina [Johnson/2003]. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 131, pg. 81. Gow (Complete Collection), Part 1, 1799; pg. 4. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 115. Johnson (A Twenty Year Anniversary Collection), 2003; pg. 1. Lerwick (Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 76‑77. McGibbon (Scots Tunes, book III), 1762; pg. 92. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 80, pg. 107. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, includes the 'traditional' and 'unwritten' melodies), pg. 40.

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:MacPherson’s Lament

L:1/8

M:C

S:Gow – 1st Repository  (1799)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

(C/D/E)|F3G F2A2|GFGA {A}G2FE|F3G (AG)(FE)|{E}D4 D2 (C/D/E)|F3G F2A2|

{A}G>FGA {A}G2FE|F2 ED (GE)(FD)|C4 C2::d2|c2F2c2d2|c3A (GA)Bd|c2F2(c2d2)|

D4 ~D2d2|c2F2c3A|{A}c3A (GB)AG|F2 ED (GE)(FD)|C4 C2::(c/d/e)|f3g f2a2|{a}gfga {a}g2 fe|

f3g (ag)fe|d4 d2 (c/d/e)|f3g f2a2|{a}gfga {a}g2fe|f2 ed (ge)(fd)|c4c2::a>g|

f2F2 (BA)(GF)|{AB}c2 F2F2 a>g|f2 F2 (c2d2)|D4 ~D2 a>g|

f>F (F2 {EF}A>)F (F2{EF})|{=B}c3A G2A2|F2 EF (GF)(ED)|C4 C2:|

X:2

T:McPherson’s farewell

M:C

L:1/8

N:”Lively”

S:McGibbon  - Scots Tunes, book III, pg. 92  (1762)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

(D/4E/4F/) | G>AGB “tr”(A/G/A/)B/ A(G/F/) | G/B/A/)G/ (F/A/G/)F/ “tr”(E2 E)D/E/ |

G>AGB “tr”(A/G/A/)B/ A(G/F/) | G(F/E/) (A/F/)(G/E/) (D2D :: “tr”(f/e/) | dGeG c>BA”tr”(g/e/) |

dGeG (E2 E)”tr”(f/e/) | dG e/f/g/B/ “tr”c>BAB | GF/E/ A/F/G/E/ (D2D) :: (d/4e/4f/) |

g>agb “tr”(a/g/a/)b/ a”tr”(g/f/) | (g/b/a/g/) (f/a/g/f/) “tr”(e2 d)(d/4/e/4f/) | g>agb “tr”a/g/a/)b/ a(g/f/) |

g(f/e/) (a/f/)(g/e/) (d2d) :: “tr”(f/e/) | (d/G/)(e/G/) (d/G/)(e/G/) c>B A”tr”(f/e/) | (d/G/)(e/G/) (f/G/)(g/G/) (E2 E)”tr”(f/e/) |

d/(g/”tr”f/e/) (d/c/B/)d/ (c/B/A/)c/ (B/A/)(G/F/) | (G/F/G/)E/ A/F/G/E/ (D2D) :|

           


MACPHERSON'S RANT. AKA‑ "MacPherson's Lament," "Macpherson's Testament." Scottish, English; Slow Air, Rant, Reel or Strathspey. England, Northumberland. F Major (Emmerson, Gow, Vickers): C Major (Johnson): G Major (Martin, Skinner). Standard. AB (Martin, Skinner): AABB (Emmerson/Gow): AABBCC (Vickers): ABCB (Johnson). Essentially the same tune as that entitled "MacPherson's Lament;" see notes for that tune. The melody appears in the Bodleian Manuscript (in the Bodleian Library,  Oxford), inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland written by Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740." It also appears in Angus Cumming's 1780 collection (pg. 12), and Gow's Repository, Part First, 1799. "Although I have seen a version identical to Vicker's uncorrected version (in the "Dancing Master"...), its third strain has such awkward intervals that I doubt if anyone today would consider it worth playing, even if it were thought to be correct, which seems unlikely. Hence my reworking of this part, giving a version still fairly different from others current today; c.f. Hunter, 1979 (Fiddle Music of Scotland), No. 10, 'Macpherson's Testament'" (Seattle). Johnson (1984) states that his version, reprinted from the Sinkler Manuscript (1710), is the earliest known fiddle tune in strathspey rhythm. Source for notated version: Sinkler Manuscript, pg. Emmerson (Rantin’ Pipe and Tremblin’ String), 1971; No. 47, pg. 139. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 10. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1984; No. 5, pg. 23. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 2, 1988; pg. 27. Martin (Traditional Scottish Fiddling), 2002; pg. 32. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 397. Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904; pg. 149.

X:1

T:MacPherson’s Rant

M:C

L:1/8

S:Skinner – Harp and Claymore (1904)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D | G>AGB | A/G/A/B/ AG/F/ | G>A (B/A/).G/.F/ (E2 E) D | G>A GB A/G/A/B/ A(G/F/) |

G>E (A/F/G/E/) (D2D) || B | .d.G.d.e .B.A.A.B | dG de E2 E2B | dG de BAA (G/F/) |

G>E A/F/G/E/ (D2D) | d | g>agb a/g/a/b/ a(g/f/) | g>a (b/a/g/f/) (e2e) d |

g>agb a/g/a/b/ a(g/f/) | g>e (a/f/g/e/) (d2d) ||

           

MACPHERSON'S TESTAMENT. AKA and see "MacPherson's Rant."

           

MACRIMMON'S FAREWELL. See "The Piper's Weird."

           

MACRIMMON'S WEIRD. Scottish. One of the tunes included by J. Scott Skinner in his 1921 concert set romantically entitled "Warblings From the Hills." It is, perhaps, an amalgamation of the alternate titles "Macrimmon's Farewell" and "The Piper's Weird."

           

MACROOM LASSES, THE ("Na Cailinide Ua Mag-Cromp" or "Cailini Mag-Crompa"). AKA and see "Farrell O'Gara's Favorite Reel," “Last Night in Leadville,” "Last Night's Fun [1]," “More Power to Your Elbow,” "Old Joe Sife’s Reel," “Pretty Jane’s Reel,” “Stick it in the Ashes.” Irish; Reel, Highland or Fling. A Major. Standard tuning. AAB. The ‘B’ part requires playing in third position on the fiddle. A member of the “Farrel O’Gara” family of tunes (see note under that title). Philippe Varlet identifies the tune as a highland from the Scottish tune “Farrell O’Gara’s Favourite.” The great New York/County Sligo fiddler Michael Coleman recorded the tune under the title “The Killarney Wonder Schottische [1].” “Stick it in the Ashes” and “More Power to Your Elbow” are related tunes. O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915/1987; No. 233, pg. 124. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1219, pg. 230. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 496, pg. 94. CEF  057, “Jackie Daly & Seamus Creagh.”

X:1

T:Macroom Lasses

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 496

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

AF | EAAc BAaf | ecBd cAFA | EAAc BAaf | ecBc A2 :|

|| (3efg | agaf eace | dBcA BAfg | agaf eac’a | babc’ a2 ab |

c’afa eace | dBcA BAFA | EFAB cAaf | ecBc A2 ||

           

MAC'S FANCY. AKA and see “The Inverness Jig [2],” “MacGregor Jig,” “March of Donald Lord of the Isles to the Battle of Harlaw (1411),” “O’Reilly’s Jig,” “The Rover’s Return,” “The Victor’s Return.” Irish, Jig. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB.  A version of a Scottish tune entitled “March of Donald Lord of the Isles to the Battle of Harlaw.” Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 203, pg. 108. Green Linnnet SIF 3037, Silly Wizard - "Golden, Golden" (1985). Shanachie 79005, De Dannann - “The Mist Covered Mountain” (appears as 1st tune on album).

X:1

T:Mac's Fancy

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

Z:Transcribed by Caroline Foty

K:AMix

|: eAA fed|eAA Bcd|eAA gfe|dBG Bcd|eAA fed|eAA Bcd|~g3 gfe|dBG Bcd:|

|:A2a aga|aga aga|A2a aga|gfe dBG|A2a aga|aga agf|~g3 gfe|dBG Bcd:|

X:2

T: Mac's Fancy

S: De Danaan

Q: 325

R: jig

Z:Transcribed by Bill Black

M: 6/8

L: 1/8

K: Dmix

ADD BAG | ADD EFG | ADD c2 A | GEC CEG |

ADD BAG | ADD EFG | AdB cBA | GEC CEG :|

Add ^cdd | Add dAB | c2 c cBA | GEC CEG |

Add ^cdd | Add dAB | cde dcA | GEC CEG :|


           

MACSWAIN’S REEL. Canadian, Reel. Canada; Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune comes from the whistling of Prince Edward Island accompanist Charlie MacSwain’s father, who learned the tune in Nova Scotia. Source for notated version: Archie Stewart {from the elder MacSwain’s whistling} (b. 1917, Milltown Cross, South Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 80.

 

MACSWEENEY’S MARCH. Irish, March. A tune played by the great Donegal piper Tarlach Mac Suibhne, the Piobaire Mor, who was one of seven pipers who performed at the first Feis Ceoil in Dublin, 1897 (as recorded by the Evening Telegraph). Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) thinks it must be the tune of the same name published by Mac Suibne’s brother Padraig in Songs of Uladh. It is a MacSweeney chieftain who is depicted in a famous 1581 woodcut by John Derricke, sitting at a feast being entertained by a bard and a harper, one of the most famous Tudor images of Ireland. The MacSweeney family derived from the Mac Sween’s of Scotland, a Norse-Scots clan who emigrated to Ireland as galloglasses (from the Gaelic word Gallaglach, meaning ‘foreign soldiers’) to help in the wars against the English. In Scotland the Sweens had entered into a treaty in 1310 with the Plantagenet king Edward II, against John, Earl of Menteith, in a bid to regain their ancestral lands in Knapdale. This attempt failed and the family fled to Ireland where they established themselves in Ulster, Munster and Connaught, particulary in Tir Connell (Donegal) where they became lords of a quarter of the region (Sanger & Kinnaird, Tree of Strings, 1992).

                       

MACTON REEL. Canadian, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by one-time Canadian Champion fiddler Ward Allen. GRT Records 9230-1031, “The Best of Ward Allen” (1973). Sparton Records SP 213, “Ward Allen Presents Maple Leaf Hoedown, vol. 3.”

X:1

T:Macton Reel

C:Ward Allen

R:reel

M:4/4

L:1/8

Z:Transcribed by Bruce Osborne

K:D

(3A,B,C|D2 DC DEFG|EDEF G2 FG|AFGE FEDB,|CFED CA,B,C|

D2 DC DEFG|EDEF G2 FG|AFGE FEDB,|CDEC D2:|

|:(3ABc|d2 dc dAFA|dfed cABc|d2 cd BdAF|GBAG FDCE|

D2 DC DEFG|EDEF G2 FG|AFGE FEDB,|CDEF D2:|

                       

MACVICAR'S. Scottish, Strathspey. C Major. Standard tuning. AABCCD. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 68.

X:1

T:MacVicar’s

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

c|G<E E>c G<E E>c|G<E c>E D2 D>e|G<E E>G c>de>d|c>AG>E D2 D:|

e|ce/f/ g>e c<ge<a|g<c g>e d2 d>e|ce/f/ g>e c<g e>d|c>Ac>E D2 D>e|

ce/f/ g>e c<ge<a|g<c g>e d2 de/f/|g>ef>d e>cd>B|c>AG>E D2D||

|:E|C>GE>c G>cE>c|C>GE>c D2 D>E|C>GE>G c>de>d|c>Ac>E D2D:|

e/f/|g>ce>c g<cf<a|g>cg>e d2 de/f/|g<c e>d c>de>d|c>AG>E D2 De/f/|

g<c e>c g<c f>a|g<c g>e d2 d^c/d/|e>cd>B c>AG>E|F>dE>c D2D||

 

_________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

Please help maintain the viability of the Fiddler’s Companion on the Web by respecting the copyright.

For further information see Copyright and Permissions Policy or contact the author.

 

 


 [COMMENT1]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT2]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - On.