The Fiddler’s Companion

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

[COMMENT1] [COMMENT2] 

AR

[COMMENT3] 

 

Notation Note: The tunes below are recorded in what is called “abc notation.” They can easily be converted to standard musical notation via highlighting with your cursor starting at “X:1” through to the end of the abc’s, then “cutting-and-pasting” the highlighted notation into one of the many abc conversion programs available, or at concertina.net’s incredibly handy “ABC Convert-A-Matic” at

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html 

 

**Please note that the abc’s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc conversion programs. For example, I use abc2win and abcNavigator 2 with no problems whatsoever with direct cut-and-pasting. However, due to an anomaly of the html, pasting the abc’s into the concertina.net converter results in double-spacing. For concertina.net’s conversion program to work you must remove the spaces between all the lines of abc notation after pasting, so that they are single-spaced, with no intervening blank lines. This being done, the F/C abc’s will convert to standard notation nicely. Or, get a copy of abcNavigator 2 – its well worth it.   [AK]

 

[COMMENT4] 

 

AR A' mBAILE SEO TA AN CHIOLFHIONN (In this village dwells the fair lady). AKA and see "Within this Village Dwells a Maid [1]."

                       

AR BRUAC NA ABAINNE. AKA and see "On the River Bank."

                       

'AR ÉIRINN NI 'NEOSFAINN CE HI (“For Ireland I Won't Say Her Name” or “For Ireland I’ll Not Tell Her Name”). AKA and see “For Ireland I Won’t Say Her Name [1].”

                       

AR HYD Y NOS. Welsh, Air. The tune appears in Jones’s first edition of Musical and Poetical Relicks of the Welsh Bards (1784).

                       

AR LAOCHRA. Irish, Air (or Jig). D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Frank Roche, who compiled the early 20th century collection bearing his name. Roche Collection, 1982; vol. III, pg. 11.

                       

AR MAIDIN GO MOC. AKA and see "Early in the Morning [1]."

                       

AR MHUIN NA MUICE.  AKA and see “On the Pig’s Back.” Irish, Reel. Composed by County Tipperary fiddler Seán Ryan (d. 1985). Ryan (Seán Ryan’s Dream); 22.

 

AR n-OILEAN BEAG FEIN. AKA and see "Our Own Little Isle."

                       

AR SLIABH BREAC. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major/Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by fiddler and pianist Josephine Keegan (b. 1935), of Mullaghbawn, south County Armagh. Keegan (The Keegan Tunes), 2002; pg. 85.

                       

AR THAOIBH NA CARRAIGE BAINE. Irish, Air. The tune printed under this title in Petrie’s 1855 collection is, in fact, “Bruach na Carraige Baine” (The Brink of the White Rock), explains Ó Canainn (1978), despite Petrie’s protestations in his introduction that it is not “Bruach na Carraige Baine.”

           

ARABELLA’S (WALTZ).  English (?), Waltz. D Major (‘A’ and ‘B’ parts) & B Minor (‘C’ part). Standard tuning. AABBCC. Kennedy (Fiddler’s Tune-Book: Slip Jigs and Waltzes), 1999; No. 94, pg. 23.

                       

ARABY'S DAUGHTER. Irish, Air (6/8 time, "with spirit"). D Major. Standard tuning. AB. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 305, pg. 53.

X:1

T:Araby’s Daughter

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”With spirit”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 305

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

d | fzd f>ed | e>de fdd | d>cB Adf | egf e2 d/e/ | f>ed f>ed | e>de fdd |

dcB Adf | ede d2 || A | AAA BAA | AAA dAA | AAA f>ed | c<eG A2A |

f>ed f>ed | e>de fdd | dcB Adf | ede d2 ||

                                   

ARAIDH/AIRIDH NA mBADAN. AKA and see "The Glen of Copsewood." See Bayard's notes for "Over the River to Charlie."

                                   

ARAN BOAT SONG. See "The Arran Boat."

                                   

ARBANA. AKA and see "Ben Butler's Reel." American, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 17. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pgs. 42 & 78.

X:1

T:Arbana

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, pg. 42  (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bb

(3F/G/A/|B/F/d/B/ A/F/e/c/|B/F/d/B/ g/f/e/c/|B/F/d/B/ A/F/e/c/|A/F/G/A/ B:|

|:d|c/B/A/G/ F/A/c/e/|d/B/f/d/ b/f/e/d/|c/B/A/G/ F/A/c/e/|d/e/c/A/ B:|

|:(g/f/)|=e/g/B/g/ e/g/B/g/|f/c/a/f/ b/a/g/f/|=e/g/B/g/ e/g/B/g/|f/a/g/=e/ f:|

|:f|f/e/c/A/ F/E/C/E/|D/F/B/d/ f/d/b/f/|f/e/c/A/ F/E/C/E/|D/B/A/c/ B:|

                                   

ARBEADIE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 6.

X:1

T:Arbeadie

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

C:J. Scott Skinner

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A>G F>A D<D F2 | B>A G>B E<E G2 | A>G F>A D<D F2 | G>B C<A F<D D2 :|

|| g | f/g/a (3gfe dFAd | (3gab (3agf eGBe | f/g/a (3gfe dFAd | (3cde (3bag f<d d>g |

(3fga (3gfe dFAd | (3gab (3agf eGBe | f/g/a g/f/e (3dcB (3AGF | (3EFG (3ABc d<D D2 || 

                                   

ARBOE [1]. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; vol. 3, No. 60.

 

ARBOE [2]. AKA and see “Come West Along the Road,” “The Monasteraden Fancy,” “Over the Moor to Peggy.”

           

ARCADIAN CONTEST, THE. English, Jig. England, North‑West. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Knowles (Northern Frisk), 1988; No. 74.

                       

ARCADIAN NUPTIALS. English, American; Country Dance Tune (9/8 time). F Major. Standard tuning. AABBCC. Charles and Samuel Thomson's 200 Country Dances, volume III (London, 1773, pg. 100) contains one of the earliest printings of this melody, however, it is perhaps quite a bit older since the piece by this title was recorded as having been one of the melodies danced to at a 1752 "turtle frolic" at Goats Island, near Newport, Rhode Island (a turtle frolic was a special event when West Indes turtles, towed astern from the Carribean, arrived in port). “Arcadian Nuptials” was reprinted in the Thompson’s 200 Country Dances, vol. IV (London, 1780), and was also published in Longman and Broderip’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances (London, 1781). It appears in America in a Connecticut MS by Asa Willcox from 1793, and in the 1788 music copybook of fiddlers John and William Pitt Turner (Norwich, Conn.). Country dance figures appear in the Thompson’s Twenty-Four Country Dances for the Year 1765 (London), Select Collection, printed in Ostego, New York, in 1808, and in an anonymous country dance book dated 1795 from New Hampshire (see EASMES for detailed information). The Arcadian Nuptials was a masque by renowned English composer Thomas Arne (1710-1778), written in 1764 in celebration of the marriage of Princess Augusta and the Prince of Brunswick. The work marked a high point in his career, after which it declined despite some success with stagings of his works in the last decade of his life. Knowles (A Northern Lass), 1995; pg. 7. Thompson (Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3 (London, 1773; No. 195.

X:1

T:Arcadian Nuptuals

M:9/8

L:1/8

B:Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3 (London, 1773)

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

F3 AFA cAc|F3 dBd G3|F3 AFA cAc|def gfe f3:|

|:a3 afd afd|efg gec|gec|a3 afd gec|def gfe f3:|

|:cAF cAF Acf|dBG dBG Bdg|cAF cAF Acf|cBA GFE F3:||

                       


ARCADIAN ONE STEP. Cajun, One‑step. USA, Louisiana. The tune was originally recorded in 1929 by Cajun accordion player Joseph Falcon. Harry Smith (Folkways FS1952, 1952) writes: “The accordion, one of the most basic Arcadian instruments, is seldom heard in the states north of Louisiana.” Columbia 40513F (78 RPM), Joseph Falcon (1929). Folkways FA 1952, "Anthology of American Folk Music, vol. 2: Social Music" (1952).

                       

ARCHDUKE JOHN OF AUSTRIA. Scottish, Strathspey. D Minor. Standard tuning. AABB'. Archduke John of Austria (1782-1859) was a military leader, unfortunately chiefly remembered in that role for his defeat at the hands of Moreau at the Battle of Hohenlinden in Bavaria in 1800, closing the “War of the Second Coalition” during Europe’s Napoleonic Wars. Later in life he was appointed Regent of the Reich in Germany, replacing the German Confederation. The latter government was forced to reorganize in response to uprisings in many states in Germany after the French Revolution in 1848. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 214.

X:1

T:Archduke John of Austria

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

a|f<d d<c A<d d>f|e>cg>c e/f/g/e/ c<a|f<d d>c A<d d>f|e>c a/g/f/e/ f<dd:|

|:A|d>ef>e d<A A>F|E>cG>c E<C C>A|1 d>e f/g/e/f/ d<A A>F|

E>c A/B/^c/A/ d<DD:|2 D>FE>G F>AG>b|a>A a/g/f/e/ ~f<dd||

                       

ARCHIBALD MACDONALD OF KEPPOCH. Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). D Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. See "Keppoch A Wilderness" for related history of the MacDonalds of Keppoch. The tune was first published by the Scots fiddler, collector and composer Captain Simon Fraser (1773-1852) of Ardachie, near Fort Augustus. Fraser's work The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles contained many works collected from vaious sources during the period 1715-1745. The MacDonalds of Keppoch were a distinguished branch of Clan MacDonald, who supported the Stewart monarchs in the 17th century, culminating with their participation in the Jacobite risings of the 18th century. As a result of their support for the Jacobite cause they lost their lands in Lochaber/ Roy Bridge and they are currently without an officially recognized clan chief. Although it has not been determined which individual has been honored in the title, an Archibald MacDonald lived from 1678 to 1745, dying just prior to the entrance of the MacDonald’s of Keppoch on the side of Bonnie Prince Charlie in his ill-fated attempt to gain the crown of Scotland and England. Lerwick (Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 71. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 2, 1988; pg. 20 (includes a harmony part). Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 2. Culburnie Records CUL 121D, Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas – “Fire and Grace” (2004). Green Linnet SIF 1047, Johnny Cunningham ‑ "Fair Warning" (1985). Elke Baker & Liz Donaldson - "Terpsichore."

X:1

T:Archibald MacDonald of Keppoch

R:Slow Air

M:6/8

L:1/8

K:Dmin

D/E/|F>GA f>ed|c<AF G2 D/E/|F>GA f>ed |A<d^c d2:|

d/e/||f>ed c>BA|B>AG A2 D/E/|F>GA f>ed|A<d^c d2 f/g/|

a>gf A<fd|c>AF G2 D/E/|F>GA f>ga|A<d^c d2||

                       

ARCHY BOYLAN. Irish, Air (2/4 time). E Flat Major/Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AB. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 744, pg. 186.

X:1

T:Archy Boylan

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 744

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

G/A/ | BB BA/B/ | c>B AF | AF EE | E3 || G/A/ | BB Bc/d/ |

ee ed/e/ | f>e _dc/B/ | c3 c/B/ | BB Bc/d/ | ee ed/e/ | f>e _dc/B/ |

c3 d/c/ | BB BA/B/ | c>B AF | AF EE | E3 ||

                       

ARCHIE/AIRCHE BROWN. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 20.

                       


ARCHIE MENZIE'S REEL. AKA and see "Bells of St. Louis." Scottish, Canadian, New England; Reel. Canada; Ontario, Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. F Major (Brody, Cranford, Hunter, Martin & Hughes, Perlman, Phillips, Welling): D Major (Begin, Bohrer/Kibler). Standard tuning. AB (Hunter): AABB (most versions). Composed by Scottish musician John Lowe (1797-1866), father of the Joseph Lowe who published a collection in 1840, who also wrote the classic tune “Rachael Rae.” Menzies was originally a Norman name, introduced into Scotland in the half-century after the conquest of England by William the Conqueror; it is pronounced in Scotland ‘Minghees’. Lowe may have composed his tune in honor of Archibald Menzies (1754-1842), a Perthshire doctor/surgeon who gained fame as the naturalist attached to a Royal Navy expedition to explore the west coast of America. More likely, the title honors Archibald Menzies, born in Dull Perthshire, about 1806. Menzies earned a reputation as on e of the best strathspey and reel players of his day, taking many prizes at competitions. He played at the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh, for several years until his death in that city in the year 1856 [George Robertson]. Or, he could have composed it for (a young) Archie Menzies, also a musician—see his composition “Miller of Camserney”—who eventually became first conductor of the Highland Reel and Strathspey Society in 1889.  It is a very popular tune among Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, fiddlers. Perlman (1996) notes that Prince Edward Island fiddlers often play the ‘b’ flat notes almost natural at several points in the tune. See also the Québec version called “Rêve du Quêteux (Tremblay).” Sources for notated versions: the late Graham Townsend (d. 1999, Ontario, Canada) [Brody]; Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ontario) [Begin]; Winston Scotty Fitzgerald (Cape Breton) [Phillips]; unnamed Canadian fiddler [Bohrer/Kibler]; Francis MacDonald (b. 1940, Morell Rear, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 14, pg. 27 (appears as “Archie Menzies Hornpipe”). Bohrer (Vic Kibler), 1992; No. 11, pg. 11. Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 24. Cranford (Jerry Holland’s), 1995; No. 147, pg. 42.  Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 259. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 116. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 9. Welling (Welling’s Hartford Tune Book), 1976; pg. 17. Avoca 139, Sean Maguire‑‑"Music of Ireland." Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston “Scotty” Fitzgerald - “Classic Cuts” (reissue of Celtic Records CX17). Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert (Cape Breton) - “In Jig Time!” (1995). Celtic 17, "Winston Scotty Fitzgerald." Rounder 7002, Graham Townsend‑ "Le Violin/ The Fiddle." Rounder 7004, Joseph Cormier‑ "The Dances Down Home" (1977).

X:1

T:Archie Menzies Reel

M:C|

L:1/8

S:From a transcription by Carmelle Begin of the playing of fiddler Dawson Girdwood.

K:D

A,2|:D2 (A,D) FDA,D|FABc dAFD|({E/F/}E2) (B,E) GEB,E|GABc dBAF|

D2 (A,D) FDA,D|FABc dAFD|G2 (EG) (FE)(DE/F/)|1 EDCE D2 (A,B,/C/):|2

EDCE D2 (3ABc||

|:d2 (A>d) f>DA>d|f>de>c d>AFA|e2 (Be) geBe|gefd e(dc>A)|

d2 (A>d) fdAd|fdec dA FD|G>FE>G F>E (3DEF|1 (3EED C>E D2 (3ABc:|2

E>DC>E D2 (A,B,C||

X:2

T:Archie Menzies Reel

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:F

C2|F2 CF AFEF|Acde fdAF|G2 DG BGDG|Bdef gdBG|

F2 CF AFEF|Acde fcAF|BdGB AcFA|GFDE F2:|

|:e2|f2 cf afef|cfag fedc|g2 dg bg^fg|dgba gfed|cfef afef|cfag fedc|BdGB AcFA|GFDE F2:|

 

ARCHIE NEIL CHISHOLM. Canadian, Pipe March (cut time). Canada, Cape Breton. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB’. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton). Cranford (Brenda Stubbert’s), 1994; No. 3, pg. 2. Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert - “In Jig Time!” (1995).

 

ARCHIE STEWART’S FAVORITE.  Canadian, Jig. Canada, Prince Edward Island. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 3, pg. 15.

 

ARCHIE STEWART’S REEL. Canadian, Reel. Canada; Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: the tune was learned from a broadcast from New Brunswick of a radio fiddler and remembered (though not the title) by Archie Stewart (b. 1917, Milltown Cross, South Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 80.

 

ARCHIE'S FANCY. English, Waltz. England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Northumbrian small-piper Billy Pigg (1902-1968), named in honor of Archie Dagg. Dagg, a farmer and maker of small-pipes, was a member of the concert band The Border Minstrels, and composed “Elsie’s Waltz.” Callaghan (Hardcore English), 2007; pg. 83. Lerwick (The Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 59.

 

ÁRD AN BHÓTHAIR (High Part of the Road). AKA and see “High Part of the Road,” “Blooming Meadows [1].”

 

ÁRD MHÍN, AN. AKA and see “High Level {Hornpipe} [1].”

 

ÁRD NA BRAHAR. AKA and see "Friars' Hill."

 

ARDA BERKSHIRE. AKA and see "The Berkshire Heights."

 

ARDAIDH CUAIN. Irish, Air. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. Ardaidh Cuain (Ardí Cuan or Ardicoan) is a townland in County Antrim, situated on a hill above Knocknacarry and Cushendun in the north-east part of the county.

***

Ardí Cuan (from, Ceolta Gael, ed. Seán óg and Manus O Baoill)
***
Dá mbeinn féin in Airdí Cuan

in aice an tsléibhe úd 'tá i bhfad uaim
b'annamh liom gan dul ar cuairt
go Gleann na gcuach Dé Domhnaigh.

***
Curfá
Agus och, och Éire 'lig is ó
Éire lonndubh agus ó
is é mo chroi  'tá trom is é brónach.

***
Is iomaí Nollaig 'bhi mé féin
i mbun abhann Doinne is mé gan chéill
ag iomáin ar an trá bhán
is mo chamán bán i mo dhorn liom.

Curfá
***
Nach tuirseach mise anseo liom féin
nach n-airim guth coiligh, londubh nó traon,
gaelbhán, smaolach, naoscach féin,
is chan aithnim féin an Domhnach.

Curfá
***
Dá mbeadh agam féin ach coit is rámh
nó go n-iomarfainn ar an tsámh
ag dúil as Dia go sroichfinn slán
is go bhfaighinn bás in Éirinn.

Curfá

***

Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, vol. 1), 1999; pg. 42.

 

ARDCLACH. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AA'B. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 43, pg. 16.

 

ARDERIN. Irish. Composed by County Tipperary fiddler Seán Ryan (d. 1985). Ryan (Seán Ryan’s Dream: The Second Collection), 26.

 

L'ARDEUR DE PARIS. American, Waltz. D Minor. Standard tuning. Composed by Eric Scott (1924-1991) in 1985, who thought the melody reminiscent of French cafe waltzes. His wife suggested the name, which means "glow of Paris." One part. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 3.

 

ARDKINGLAS'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. The tune appears in a MS inscribed "A Collection of the best Highland Reels written by David Young, W.M. & Accomptant."

 

ARDLAMON. Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Ardlamon is a place name from County Limerick. "From Davy Cleary, piper and dancing‑master, Kilfinane: 1842" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 39, pg. 22.

X:1

T:Ardlamon

M:C

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs  (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

DGGF G2 Bc|dgfa gdBG|EAAG A2 BA|GFGE DCB,A,|

G,GGF GABc|dgfa gdBG|Eedc BAGF|G2G2 G3z:|

|:Eeed efga|bagf edBA|G2 GA BABd|egfd e/d/BAF|

E2 ed e2 ga|b/c’/baf edBG|Eedc BAGF|G2G2G2:|

 

ARDOIN TWO-STEP. AKA and see “Perrodin Two Step.” Cajun/Creole, Two-Step. A version of the “Perrodin Two-Step.” Arhoolie CD445, Alphonse “Bois Sec” Ardoin with Canray Fontenot - “La Musique Creole.”

 


ARDRISHAIG. AKA and see “Donald John the Tailor.” Scottish, Cape Breton; Strathspey. Originally published in Robert MacKinnon’s Collection of Highland Pipe Music (1901/6). Ardrishaig (or, in Gaelic, ‘Rudh Ard driseig’) is a place name. A Cape Breton pipe setting can be found in Barry Shears’ Cape Breton Collection of Bagpipe Music (1995).  

 

ARDROSSAN CANAL, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. F Major. Standard Tuning. AB. Composed by Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831). The Glasgow, Paisley and Ardrossan Canal was a project originally designed to connect industrial interior Scotland with the west coast ports. It was the brainchild of Hugh Montgomerie, 12th Earl of Eglinton, in 1891 (to whom the Gows dedicated their Fourth Collection of Strathspeys & Dances, Edinburgh,1803), in part to take advantage of his Ayrshire coal fields and his new deep-water port of Ardrossan. Major portions of the canal were completed by 1811, however, the canal was never completed to its terminus and was outdated almost from the time it started to function. It was quickly replaced in the service it was created for by railroads, and yielded not a dividend for its investors. Poet Robert Tannahill (who suffered from depressive episodes) drowned himself in a culverted stream under the canal in 1810, after receiving a rejection notice from a publisher. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 4. Gow (Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels), 1809; pg. 26.

X:1

T:Ardrossan Canal, The

M:C
L:1/8

N:”Slow”

R:Strathspey

C:Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831)

B:Gow – Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels (1809)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:F

A|”tr”F2 {FG}A>F c>F AF|(D<F) (C>A,) C2 ~CD/E/|”tr”F2 A>F cA {fg}a>g|f(FAF) {^F}G2 GA|

“tr”F2 {FG}A>F c>FA>F|DE/F/ (E/C/)(B,/A,/) {A,}C2 C>A,|(3#B,/D/F/ (3B/d/f/ b>B, (3A,/C/f/ (3A/c/f/ a>c|a>c f>F {^F}G2G||

c|f2 {fg}a>f {a}(g/f/)(g/e/) f/d/~c/A/|F/c/A/f/ (d/c/).B/.A/ {A}c2 “tr”cd/e/|fF (a/g/).a/.f/ (g/e/)(f/d/) (c/A/)f/A/|(G/A/G/)^f/ (G/A/B/)c/ {Bc}d2 d (c/d/4e/4)|

.fF {b}a/>g/a/f/ {a}g/>f/g/e/ {g}f/>e/f/d/|c/>d/c/A/ (c/A/)f/A/ ~c2 .c/(f/g/a/)|.b/.f/.d/.B/ .F/.D/.B, .a/.f/.c/.A/ .F/.C/.A,|a/>f/g/>e/ f/>c/A/>F/ {^F}G2 G||

 

ARDTAOISEAC FRASER, AN. AKA and see "Colonel Fraser."

 

ARDTAOISEAC MIC BAEITINE, AN. AKA and see "Colonel McBain's."

 

ARDTAOISEAC RODNAIG, AN. AKA and see "Colonel Rodney."

           

ARE YE SLEEPIN’ MAGGIE?  Scottish, Air or March. E Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. A song air employed as a march by fiddler Randy Miller. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 328, pg. 194.

                       

ARE YOU HUNGRY LITTLE SEAMUS? (A Sheamuis Bhig a bhfuil Ocras Ort?). AKA and see “The Roving Bachelor.” Irish, Highland. See “(A) Sheamuis Bhig a bhfuil Ocras Ort?

                                   

ARE YOU NOT THE BRIGHT STAR THAT USED TO BE BEFORE ME? AKA and see “One night I dreamt.”

                       

ARE YOU READY YET? Irish, Reel. E Minor. Standard tuning. AABBCC. Composed by Danú flute player Tom Doorley, “with a little inspiration from his girlfriend Deirdre.” Shanachie 78030, Danú – “Think Before You Think” (2000). 

X:1

T:Are You Ready Yet?

R:Reel

D:Danu: Think Before You Think

Z:Bill Reeder

M:C|

L:1/8

K:Em

B2AF EGFE|FDFA dAFA|BAAF EGFE|FGFD ~B3A|

B2AF EGFE|FDFA dAFA|BAAF EGFE|FGFD ~B3c:||

Beed deef|gefa gfeg|fdBA B2fB|gBfB edBA|

Beed deez|gefa g4|bage agfd|Bgfd e4:||

BAGF ~G3A|dBAG FEDF|E2BA (3Bcd eg|ef~f2 e2fe|

edBe dBAF|BAGF EFGA|BedB AcBA|GAFA E4:||

                       

ARE YOU SHOT?  AKA and see "The Ducks and The Oats." See also "The Tenpenny Bit [2]," "The New Tenpenny."

 

ARE YOU WILLING? (An E Do Toil E?)  Irish, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AA'B (O'Neill/Krassen). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 150. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1494, pg. 276. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 718, pg. 126.

X:1

T:Are You Willing?

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 718

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

A2 EA FAEA|ABcA BABc|A2 EA FAEA|faed cABc|A2 EA FAEA|

ABcA BABc|defg agae|fdBd cA A2||agae fece|dBcA GAFA|

agae fgae|fdBd cAAg|aece fece|dBcA BAFA|A,CEA ceae|fdBd cA A2||

 

AREIR A TEIRIGHIG SCEUL DHOM TREM NEULTA. AKA and see "Last Night a Story Came to Me in My Dreams."

 

AREIR AS ME AG MACHTNAMH AIR BHEARTAIBH AN t-SAOGHAIL. AKA and see "Last Night as I was Thinking of the Ways of the World."

 

ARETHUSA, THE. AKA – ‘The Saucy Arethusa.” AKA and see "The Princess Royal [1]." See also Oswald's "My Love is Lost to Me," which Bayard questions as to whether it is derivative of, or ancestral to, Carolan's tune. The song appeared in the opera The Lock and Key, acted in 1796, with words by Prince Hoare, music composed and selected by William Shield, and relates the engagement of the English frigate The Arethusa with a larger French warship, La Belle Poule, in the English Channel in June, 1778.  Although often attributed to Shield, he himself only claimed to have added the bass.  Irish writers have claimed that Turlough O’Carolan (1670-1738) composed the tune as “The Princess Royal,” in honor of a daughter of Macdermott Roe. Kidson (Groves), however, maintains it was an English country dance from the early 18th century, dedicated to Anne, daughter of George II, who married the Prince of Orange in 1734. For more see Roly Brown’s article at Musical Traditions (http://www.mustrad.org.uk/enthuse.htm), No. 45.

 

ARGAN MOR. AKA and see "The Battle of Argan More."

 

ARGEERS. AKA – “The Wedding Night.” English, Country Dance (2/2 time). B Flat Major (Barnes, Fleming‑Williams, Raven, Sharp): D Major (Johnson, Williamson). Standard tuning. AABB. The tune dates at least to 1651, when it was first published in John Playford’s first edition of his English Dancing Master, with the alternate title “The Wedding Night.” Williamson (1976) identifies the melody as a morris dance tune from southern England, and suggests that the title might have been a garbled version of the North African territory of 'Algiers.' This may be true: the Barbary coast, including Algiers, was long the haven of pirates that prayed on shipping for many centuries. Shakespeare and Dryden both refer to Algerian pirates by the term ‘Argiers’, and Luttrell writes: “His majestie hath granted a brief for making charitable collections for the redemption of captives at Argiers” [I, 37]. The Barbary pirates remained active into the next century, and they were a topic Playford’s day in England, as that country sought to suppress them in support of trade. Samuel Pepys makes mention in his diary for November 22nd, 1662: “News that Sir J. Lawson hath made up a peace now with Tunis and Tripoli, as well as Argiers, by which he will come home very highly honoured.” The entry references Sir John Lawson, born the son of a poor man in Hull, Yorkshire, entered the navy as a common seaman but rose to the rank of vice-admiral. Lawson spent the early 1660’s trying to suppress the pirates of the African coast and, in 1664, he “made the Algerines disgorge eighteen vessels…” after which he proceeded to relieve Tangier. He was killed fighting the Dutch in 1665, acting as Rear-Admiral of the Red under the Duke of York.

***

Algiers’ was also apparently in common use in the 1660’s as a term meaning a ‘haven for thieves’. A London pamphlet issued in 1662 (“printed for W. Gilbertson at the Bible in Giltspur-street without Newgate”), titled “The Life and Death of Mrs. Mary Frith. Commonly Called Mal Cutpurse,” purported to be the ‘diary’ of an infamous Fleet street criminal (and as such, no less fascinating to the public then, as now). She relates that her house received all kinds of stolen goods—“My House was the Algiers where (thieves) trafficked in safety without the Bribes to those Fellows (i.e. thief-catchers, the policemen of the era), and publically exposed what they had got without the danger of Inquisition or Examination or Fees of silence. I could have told in what quarter of the Town a Robberty was don the Evening before by very early day next morning, and had a perfect Inventory of what they had taken as soon as it came to the Dividend…”

***

Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes), 1986. Fleming‑Williams & Shaw (English Dance Airs; Popular Selection, Book 1), 1965; pg. 7. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician No. 14; Songs, Airs and Dances of the 18th Century), 1997; pg. 1. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 20. Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1909/1994; pg. 30. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 17. Maggie’s Music MMCD216, Hesperus - “Early American Roots” (1997).

X:1

T:Argreers

M:2/2

L:1/8

S:Sharp – Country Dance Tunes   (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bb

|: (Bcde c2.B2 | .A2.F2 F4 | (f2c2f3e | d2)B2 B4 |

(Bcde c2B2 | A3B c2 (F2 | GA B2) (ABcd | B6) z2 :|

|: (ABc2 ) (ABc2) .f2.c2.f2c2 | (ABc2) (ABc2) | .f2.c2.f2c2 |

(f2ed e2 fe | d2 cB c3)(F | GABc ABcd | B6z2 :|

 

ARGILE'S BOULING GREEN. Scottish, Country Dance. The melody appears in the Holmain Manuscript (1710‑50), a six‑page book of instructions for country dances.

 


ARGLYE('S) BOWLING GREEN. AKA and see “The Braes of Glencoe.” Scottish, Reel. C Major. Standard tuning. AB (Gow/Repository, Surenne): AAB (most versions): AABBCCDD (Bremner). The melody appears in the Drummond Castle Manuscript, inscribed "A Collection of Country Dances written for the use of his Grace the Duke of Pert by Dav. Young, 1734,” which in the early 1970's was in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle. However, perhaps not aware of that work, Glen finds the earliest appearance of the piece in Robert Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 70). It has been suggested that the ‘bowling green’ title is an Englished corruption of the Gaelic "buaile na greine" (sunny cattle-fold). However, Argyle’s Bowling Green is also the nickname of a range of hills and mountains known as the ‘Arrochar Alps’, especially as seen from the fjord-like Loch Long. A melody by this name (“Argile’s Bouling Green”) appears in the Holmain Manuscript (1710‑50), a six‑page book of instructions for country dances. The name Argyll derives from the Gaelic ‘Airer Gaedel’, or ‘coast of the Gaels,’ and refers to the area of Scotland first invaded by the Irish tribes in the 5th century. Source for notated version: George MacPhee (b. 1941, Monticello, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Bremner (Scots Reels), 1757; pg. 70. Gow (Completre Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 31. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 85, pg. 12. Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 120. Perlman, 1996; pg. 119. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 66. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852; pg. 71. WMT002, Wendy MacIsaac – “That’s What You Get” (1998?).

See also listings at:

Alan Syner’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

X:1

T:Argyle Bowling Green

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

E|C2c2 cded|cdcA G^FED|C2c2 cded|cBcE D3:|

c|GecE GEEA|GecE G2 GA|GecE GEEF|GAGE D2Da|

gec’e geea|gec’e g2ga|gec’e geef|gage d2d||

 

ARGYLE IS MY NAME. Scottish, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The name Argyll derives from the Gaelic ‘Airer Gaedel’, or ‘coast of the Gaels,’ and refers to the area of Scotland first invaded by the Irish tribes in the 5th century. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; No. 15, pg. 32.

X:1

T:Argyle is My Name

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 1, No. 15  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A|d>ed dcd|fee e2g|f>ed (f<a)A|ABc dfe|d>ed dcd|

fee e2g|f>ed (f<a)A|ABc d2::a|afd dfa|agf g2b|

afd dfa|agf eef|g>ag g>ag|A>BA g>ag|fed (f<a)A|ABc d2:|

 

ARGYLL REEL. Scottish, Reel. The name Argyll derives from the Gaelic ‘Airer Gaedel’, or ‘coast of the Gaels,’ and refers to the area of Scotland first invaded by the Irish tribes in the 5th century. Green Linnet SIF‑1094, Capercaillie ‑ "Sidewaulk" (1989).

 

ARIA DI CAMERA.  English, Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). E Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Thomas Farmer, c. 1683. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; pg. 117 (appears as “She Rose and Let Me In”, the name of a 1993 dance by Tom Cook set to the tune).

 

ARIEL HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Ball and Pin Hornpipe." New England, Canadian; Hornpipe. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune may just possibly have been named for the clipper ship Ariel, a name that appears in American Clipper Ships 1833-1858 by Howe and Matthews. “The Ball and Pin” hornpipe also appears in Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883), and is the same tune, with different endings. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 90. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 107, pg. 69. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 124.

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

X:1

T:Ariel Hornpipe

R:Hornpipe

M:2/4

L:1/16

Z:Transcribed by Bruce Osborne

K:A

A2|A,CEA c2BA|BEGB d2cB|cAce aecA|BcdB AGFE|

A,CEA c2BA|BEGB d2cB|Acea gfdB|A2c2 A2:|

|:(3efg|aece a2ga|fdBd f2ed|cAce aecA|BcdB AGFE|

aece a2ga|fdBd f2ed|Acea Begb|gefg a2:|

 

ARISAIG CAIRN. Canadian, March (2/4 time). Canada, Cape Breton. A Major/Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler Dan R. MacDonald (1911-1976). Cameron (Trip to Windsor), 1994; pg. 5.

 

ARISAIG JIG. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. E Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler and composer Dan R. MacDonald (1911-1976). Cameron (Trip to Windsor), 1994; pg. 57.

 

ARISAIG MIST. Canadian, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Dorian. Standard tuning. AABCCD. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler Wilfred Gillis, originally set in D Minor. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 230, pg. 92.

 

ARIZONA STOMP. Old‑Time, Breakdown. The tune was composed by fiddler Huggins Williams of the East Texas Serenaders. The name Arizona had humble origins, and was first used by Spanish explorers referring to ‘the little spring’. It was used by a mining company which brought it to public notice and it soon came to represent an entire territory of the American southwest (Matthews, 1972). County 410, "The East Texas Serenaders, 1927‑1936" (1977).

 


ARIZONA WALTZ. Old-Time, Waltz. D Major. Standard tuning. AA'B. The name Arizona had humble origins, and was first used by Spanish explorers referring to ‘the little spring’. It was used by a mining company which brought it to public notice and it soon came to represent an entire territory of the American southwest (Matthews, 1972). The waltz is copyrighted to Rex Allen, who recorded it in the 1950’s or 60’s. Source for notated version: Clem Myers [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 238.

 

ARK AN D’OR HOUSE. Canadian, Slow Air (4/4 time). Canada, Cape Breton. A Major. Standard tuning. AA’B. Composed by fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton). Cranford (Brenda Stubbert’s), 1994; pg. 1. Brenda Stubbert - “House Sessions” (1992).

 

ARKANSAS JITTERS. American, Breakdown. USA, Arizona. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 98, pg. 35.

X:1

T:Arkansas Jitters

L:1/8

M:2/4

S:Viola “Mom” Ruth – Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G|BB/d/ BB/d/|BGAB|c/B/c/d/ cB|A3 (3A/B/c/|da/g/ fa/g/|

fdef|g/f/g/a/ ge|d/e/d/c/ B/A/G/A/|BB/d/ BB/d/|BGAB|

c/B/c/d/ cB|A3 (3A/B/c/|da/g/ fa/g/|fdef|g/f/g/a/ g/f/e/f/|

[d3g3] (g/a/)||ba g/f/e/f/|ag ff/g/|ag f/e/d/e/|fe d/B/G/A/|BB/d/ BB/d/|

BGAB|c/B/c/d/ cB|A3 (3A/B/c/|da/g/ fa/g/|fdef|g/f/g/a/ g/f/e/f/|[B2g2][Bg]||

 

ARKANSAS HOP.  Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri. A Major. AEae tuning. AA’BBCC. Related to “Rye Straw,” in the opinion of Mark Wilson. Drew Beisswenger (2008) also notes similarties to the Ozark version of “Paddy Won’t You Drink Some Good Old Cider.” The third part is entirely pizzicato, although source Teague strummed instead of plucked the fiddle. Source for notated version: Howe Teague (1913-2005, Dent County, Missouri), learned from Roy Wooliver [Beisswenger & McCann]. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozark Fiddle Music), 2008; pg. 147. Rounder CD 0435, Howe Teague – “Traditional Fiddle Music of the Ozarks, vol. 1” (1999. Various artists).

 

ARKANSAS PUMPKINS. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. Appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes recorded by folklorist Vance Randolph for the Library of Congress in the 1940's.

 

ARKANSAS SHEIK.  See note for “Old Leather Bonnet with a Hole in the Crown.”

 

ARKANSAS STOMP. Old‑Time. Caney Mountain Records CEP 102 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1965‑66.

 

ARKANSAS TRAVELER. Old‑Time, Bluegrass, American; Reel, Country Dance. USA, almost universally known. D Major (Rosenberg, Sweet, Titon, White): G Major (Shaw): A Major (Kerr). Standard or ADae (Edden Hammons, Molsky) tunings. One part (Burchenal): AB (Shaw): AABB (most versions): AABBA'A' (Phillips, 1994). One of, if not the most famous of American fiddle tunes. E. Southern (1983) calls "Arkansas Traveller" a "plantation fiddle tune" (pg. 186), while Cauthen (1990) writes that it "had been played and sung as (an) anonymous folk tune, claimed and popularized by minstrel performers, then passed into the realm of folk music once more" (pg. 15).  It is true that at least some of the elements of the famous dialogue typically attached to the melody  (i.e. the conversation between the 'hick' and the 'city-slicker') were in circulation in the 1820's‑1830's, during the plantation era, and it has been found that the tune and sketch had been joined and were being performed (in minstrel shows) not long after (Yates and Russell, O.T.M. # 31 Winter 78/79).  {For more information see article by H.C. Mercer in JEMFQ VI:2 (18) Summer 1970.} Rosenberg (198‑) records that "Arkansas Traveler" was first published by Oliver Ditson and Company of Boston in 1863 and attributed to an itinerant musician or stage comedian named Mose Case, although Cazden (et al, 1982) reports it had been previously published in Buffalo, N.Y., by Blodgett & Bradford in 1858.

***

The music itself was in print in 1847, Rosenberg states, and both the tune and the accompanying skit are presumed by him to have been in oral circulation at the time. Bayard (1981) thinks the whole melody may be an "American amalgam," as he was unable to locate a recognizable version in British Isles traditions. The second strain became a "floater," according to him, and appears in otherwise unrelated tunes, and he speculates a portion of the first part may itself have been a 'floater' that became attached to the tune. In Francis O'Neill's Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody (1922) "Arkansas Traveler" is regarded as having a 'presumable' Irish history and three tunes are given which are proffered as in part ancestral to the American melody. O’Neill says: “Vying in popularity with ‘Turkey in the Straw’, another American favorite claims our affection. Famous in song and story its origin has baffled investigation. An exhaustive research conducted by Dr. H.C. Mercer, an official of Buck's County Historical Society (Doylestown, Pa) relating to its history and antecedents failed of its purpose. All lines of inquiry extending to Kentucky, Arkansas, and Louisiana, ended in contradiction, and uncertainty. Furthermore, the quaint dialogue between the ‘Traveler’ and the backwoods fiddler was based on nothing more substantial than a fertile imagination. The opening paragraph of Dr. Mercer's essay published in the Century Magazine -On the track of the Arkansas Traveler- is well worth quoting:

***

Sometime about the year 1850 the American musical myth

known as "The Arkansas Traveler" came into vogue among

fiddlers. It is a quick reel tune with a backwoods story

talked to it while played, that caught the ear at sideshows

and circuses, and sounded over the trodden turf of fair

grounds. Bands and foreign-bred musicians were above

noticing it, but the people loved it, and kept time to it,

while tramps and sailors carried it across the seas to vie

merrily in Irish cabins with The Wind that Shakes the Barley

and The Soldier's Joy.

***

Though classed as a reel, the tune as printed with Dr. Mercer's clever essay and elsewhere, is scored as a Buckdance, and in a key much too low for certain instruments. The editor who is responsible for the setting above presented ventures to suggest that like ‘Old Zip Coon’ or ‘Turkey in the Straw’, ‘The Arkansas Traveler’ had been evolved from a venerable Irish strain by some backwoods fiddler whose identity is lost in the oblivion which engulfed the composers of the multitude of Irish melodies that have survived many influences inimical to their preservation.”

***

In Maine the piece was used for the dance "Green Mountain Volunteers" by the Singing Smiths (South Parsonfield, Me.), though the traditional tune for that dance was "Green Mountain Boys." It was one of the 'tune catagories' for an 1899 fiddle contest at Gallatin, Tenn.; i.e. the fiddler who played the best rendition of "Arkansas Traveller" won a prize (C. Wolfe, The Devil's Box, Vol. 14, No. 4, 12/1/80). Arthur Tanner (Ga.) remembers his father (Gid Tanner of Sillet Lickers fame) and uncle (Arthur Hugh Tanner) playing it "from the stage (in the 1920's/30's) and setting around the house...It would tear the audience up" (Rosenberg). The piece was found in the repertory of most traditional fiddlers in Union and Snyder counties, Pa. (Guntharp), while Cazden (et al, 1982) found the melody and humorous text well known throughout the Catskill Mountain (New York) region (he recorded a version from that locale in 1949). Kentucky fiddlers played the tune: it has been collected from Luther Strong (by Alan Lomax), John Salyer, J.W. Day, Clyde Davenport, African-American fiddler Bill Livers, Walter McNew and Kelly Gilbert (Titon, 2001). Cauthen (1990) notes in a very complete statewide survey that it was variously recorded as having been played throughout Alabama: in the northeast part of the state (in reports of the 1926‑31 De Kalb County Annual Convention), the northwest (mentioned in a 1925 Univ. of Ala. master's thesis), southwest (recorded in a newspaper account of a contest in Grove Hill, May, 1929, and recalled by Alfred Benners in his 1923 book Slavery and Its Results as having been played by slave fiddler Jim Pritchett in Marengo County), southeast (listed by Robert Park in his book Sketch of the 12th Alabama Infantry as played by Ben Smith, a Georgian in the regiment in the Civil War; and recorded as having been played at a fiddlers' convention in July 1926 at the Pike County Fairgrounds), and finally the central part of the state (played at a contest in Verbena in 1921, as recorded by the Union Banner). Seattle fiddler and musicologist Vivian Williams writes: "’Arkansas Traveller’ was played by fiddler Jake Lake (originally from Cook County, Illinois) at the wedding of Henry Van Asselt and Catherine Jane Maple in a cabin on the Duwamish River, near Seattle, on Christmas Day, 1862, according to an account written by the bride's brother, John Wesley Maple.  Other tunes played at that wedding:  ‘’The Unfortunate Dog’, ‘Fishers Hornpipe’, ‘The King's Head’, ‘Gal on a Log’, ‘Devil’s Dream’.”

***

In another Deep South state, Mississippi, it was recorded in the field from the playing of old‑time fiddlers Stephen B. Tucker, John Hatcher and W.E. Claunch (Mississippi Department of Archives and History). The tune was listed for sale on cylinders in a 1901 Columbia catalogue, and in the same format the next year by Edison (Standard Cylinder 8202, played by Len Spencer, Oct. 1902 {The tune was re-released as "Return of the Arkansas Traveler" in 1910 by the same company [Standard Cylinder 10356]}). Edison also released a version played by Joseph Samuels in Nov. 1919 contained in the "Devil's Dream Medley" (1st tune). Texas fiddler Eck Robertson's (a duet with fiddler and Confederate veteran Henry Gilliland) recording of the piece for Victor records (backed by "Sallie Gooden") was the third best-selling record of 1923 (although it had been released in a limited pressing a year earlier). The piece was "very popular" at Southwest dances around turn of the century, according to Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner. It was cited as having commonly been played for dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly), and appears in Vance Randolph's list of traditional Ozark Mountain tunes he recorded for the Library of Congress in the early 1940's. Finally, it was recorded as having been in the repertory of Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham, Henry Ford's national champion old-time fiddler, and regularly played by him in the 1920's. During the 78 RPM era an old recording of “Arkansas Traveler” was released in Québec under the title “Reel des Voyagers.”

***

Sources for notated versions: Frank George (W.Va.) [Krassen]; James Marr (Mo., 1948) [Bayard]; eleven Pa. sources [Bayard]; Gordon Tanner (Dacula, Gwinnett County, Ga.) [Rosenberg]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 20 (appendix), pg. 580; No. 74, pg. 49 (an odd variation); and No. 316, pgs. 267‑271; Jim Bowles (Rock Bridge, Monroe County, Kentucky, 1959, played with fiddle tuned ADae) [Titon]. Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 25‑ 26 (3 versions‑ 1 Bluegrass). Burchenal (American Country Dances, vol. 1), 1917; pg. 58. Cazden (Dances from Woodland), 1945; pg. 25. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 4. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 46. Jarman (Old‑Time Fiddlin' Tunes), 1938. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician: Occasional Collection of Old‑Timey Fiddle Tunes for Hammer Dulcimer, Fiddle, etc.), No. 2, 1988 (revised 2003); pg. 1. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; No. 5, pg. 22. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 44 (includes 'A' part variation). Linscott (Folk Songs from Old New England), 1939 ‑ "The Country Dance," pg. 83. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 238. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 3. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 1, 1994; pg. 17. Rosenberg, 198‑; pg. 106. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 30, pg. 12. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 26. Shaw (Cowboy Dances), 1943; pg. 390. Sweet (Fifer’s Delight), 1964; pg. 53. Titon (Old-Time Kentucky Fiddle Tunes), 2001; No. 3. pg. 34. White’s Unique Collection, 1896; No. 171, pg. 32. American Heritage 516, Jana Greif‑ "I Love Fiddlin.'" Atlantic Records LP1350, Hobart Smith ‑ "American Folk Songs for Children." Brunswick 225 (78 RPM), The Tennessee Ramblers. CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers – “Concert Collection II” (1999). Columbia 15019‑D (78 RPM), Gid Tanner & Riley Pucket. County 412, Doc Roberts. County 514, Earl Johnson and His Clodhoppers‑ "Hell Broke Loose in Georgia" (orig. rec. 1927). County 517, Eck Robertson and Henry Gilliland‑ "Texas Farewell." County 526, Gid Tanner. County 723, Cockerham, Jarrell, and Jenkins‑ "Back Home in the Blue Ridge." County 775, Kenny Baker‑ "Farmyard Swing." Edison 51381 (78 RPM), Jasper Bisbee {appears as 1st tune of "Girl I Left Behind Me" medley}. Flying Fish 102, New Lost City Ramblers ‑ "20 Years/Concert Performances" (1978). Folkways FA2337, Clark Kessinger‑ "Live at Union Grove." Folkways FA2371, Roger Sprung‑ "Ragtime Bluegrass 2." Folkways FTS 31089. Heritage 060, Art Galbraith ‑ "Music of the Ozarks" (Brandywine 1984). Kicking Mule 203, Art Rosenbaum‑ "The Art of the Mountain Banjo." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyril Stinnett - "Plain Old Time Fiddling." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Kelly Jones (b. 1947) - "Authentic Old-Time Fiddle Tunes." Old Homestead OHCS‑145, the Skillet Lickers ‑‑"A Day at the Country Fair" ("The Original Arkansas Traveller"). Paramount 3015 (78 RPM) {the same as Brunswick 8052}, 1927, and Edison 52294 (78 RPM), 1928, John Baltzell (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) {Baltzell was taught to play fiddle in part by minstrel Dan Emmett, d. 1904, who was born in and returned to [1888] the same town}. PearlMae Muisc 004-2, Jim Taylor – “The Civil War Collection” (1996). Rebel 1552, Buck Ryan‑ "Draggin' the Bow." Rebel 1515, Curly Ray Cline‑ "My Little Home in West Virginia." Rounder 0100, Byron Berline‑ "Dad's Favorites." Rounder 0117, "Blaine Sprouse". Rounder 0361, Bruce Molsky – “Lost Boy” (1996). Rounder 1003, Fiddlin’ John Carson. Rounder 1133/1134, Ed Haley. Sonyatone 201, Eck Robertson (Texas) and Henry Gilliland (Ok.) ‑ "Master Fiddler." Supertone 9172 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts. Tennvale 003, Pete Parish‑ "Clawhammer Banjo." Victor 18956 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (Texas) {1922}. Victor 21635 (78 RPM), Jilson Setters (AKA Blind Bill Day, from Rowan Cty. Ky.), 1928. Voyager 301, Byron Berline‑ "Fiddle Jam Session." Voyager 304, Bill Long and Bill Mitchell‑ "More Fiddle Jam Sessions." West Virginia University Press Sound Archives 001, Edden Hammonds, vol. 1 (1999) . Recorded by Franklin County, Va. fiddler J.W. "Peg" Thatcher in 1939 for Library of Congress, and by Clayton McMichen (Ga.) and Dan Hornsby in 1928. In repertoire of Uncle Jimmy Thompson (Texas/Tenn.) {1848‑1931}, Uncle Bunt Stevens (Tenn.), Fiddlin’ Cowan Powers (Russell County, S.W. Va.) {1877‑1952?}.

X:1

T:Arkansas Traveler, The

M:4/4

L:1/8

S:Capt. F. O'Neill

Z:Paul Kinder

R:Reel

K:G

d2|GBAG E2 GE|D2 DD E2 G2|ABAG "tr"B2 BG|ABAG "tr"E2 D2|

GBAG E2 GE|D2 DD G2 Bd|gfgd (3efg dc|BGAF G2||

Bc|dcBd cBAc|BAGB AFDF|GEGB AFAc|BAGB A2 Bc|

dcBd cBAc|BAGB AFDF|gfgd (3efg dc|BGAF G2||

X:2

T:Arkanses Traveller [sic]

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:William Sydney Mount manuscripts

N:Mount annotates his manuscript page with “Stony Brook (Long Island, New York)

N:August 22nd, (18)52” and “As played by P(?).J. Cook.” At the end of the first part is the

N:note “octave 2nd time,” meaning presumably that probably the first eight bars are to be

N:played an octave higher as a variation when the whole tune is repeated, probably with

N:the two bar ending that Mount entered at the top of the page. Interestingly, Mount’s

N:manuscript predates the first known publication of the melody, in Buffalo, N.Y., by

N:Blodgett & Bradford in 1858, although the tune and the story of the traveler and the

N:country fiddler were known to be in circulation some two decades beforehand,

N:stemming probably from plantation sources and then to the minstrel stage.

Z:Transcribed and annotated by Andrew Kuntz

K:D

(D/E/)F/D/ B,B,/D/ | A,A,/B,/ DD | EE FF | D/E/F/D/ B,D |

(D/E/)F/D/ B,(B,/D/) | A,A,/B,/ DA | (d/c/)(d/A/) (B/d/)(A/G/) | (F/D/)(E/F/) D2 :|

|:(a/g/)f/a/ (g/f/)e/g/ | (f/e/)d/f/ (e/c/)A2 | d/d/d e/e/e | (f/e/)d/f/ e2 |

(a/g/)f/a/ (g/f/)e/g/ | (f/e/)d/f/ (e/c/)A | (d/c/)d/A/ (B/d/)A/G/ | (F/D/)E/F/ D2 :|

“variation”

d/c/d/A/ B/c/d/e/ | f/a/e/f/ d2 :|

                                   

ARKANSAS TURNBACK. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Galbraith’s source, Willy Bilyeu, indicated the title was his, although he thought the tune was some “old hornpipe” (Beisswenger & McCann, 2008). Source for notated version: Art Galbraith (1909-1993, near Springfield, Missouri), learned around 1955 from Willy Bilyeu (Ozark, Missouri) [Phillips]. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozarks Fiddle Music), 2008; pg. 36. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 1, 1994; pg. 18. Rounder Records 0133, Art Galbraith – “Dixie Blossoms” (1981).

                       

ARKANSAS TWO-STEP.  Old-Time, Two-Step. USA, Missouri. C Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB. Fiddler Bob Holt told Mark Wilson that this was a part of the common fiddling repertory when he was young, played by most and often as the first tune for a dance. Source for notated version: Bob Holt (1930-2004, Ava, Missouri) [Beisswenger & McCann]. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozarks Fiddle Music), 2008; pg. 60. Rounder CD-0432, Bob Holt – “Got a Little Home to Go To” (1998).

 

ARKIES DELIGHT. New England, Reel. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB.

                       

ARKLOW LASSES. Irish, Slip Jig (9/8 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Kennedy (Fiddler’s Tune-Book: Slip Jigs and Waltzes), 1999; pg. 3, No. 2.

 

l’ARLICHINA MILANESE.  French, Country Dance (2/4 time). A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. From the contradance book (tunes with dance instructions) of Robert Daubat (who styled himself Robert d’Aubat de Saint-Flour), born in Saint-Flour, Cantal, France, in 1714, dying in Gent, Belgium, in 1782. According to Belgian fiddler Luc De Cat, at the time of the publication of his collection (1757) Daubat was a dancing master in Gent and taught at several schools and theaters.  He also was the leader of a choir and was a violin player in a theater. Mr. De Cat identifies a list of subscribers of the original publication, numbering 132 individuals, of the higher level of society and the nobility, but also including musicians and dance-masters (including the ballet-master from the Italian opera in London). Many of the tunes are written with parts for various instruments, and include a numbered bass. Daubat (Cent Contredanses en Rond), 1757; No. 62.

X:1

T:l’Arlichina Milanese

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Daubat – Cent Contredanses en Rond (1757), No. 62

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

e>ae>d | c2B2 | A>GA>B | c>B A2 | B>cd>c | B>cd>c | B>AG>F | {F}E2E2 :|

|: E>e E>F | E>e E>F | G>A B>c | d2c2 | f>eg>a | f>eg>a | c2”tr”B2 | A2A2 :|

                       


ARLINGTON. Canadian, Hornpipe. Canada, Cape Breton. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler and composer Dan R. MacDonald (1911-1976). Editor John Donald Cameron notes the tune may be played as a clog. Cameron (Trip to Windsor), 1994; pg. 73.

                       

ARMAGH POLKA. AKA and see “Egan’s Polka [2].” Irish, Polka. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. 
X: 1
T: Armagh Polka
T: Egan's
M: 2/4
L: 1/16
R: Polka
K: D
d2 d2 BcdB|A2F2 A2F2|d2 d2 BcdB|A2F2 E2D2|
d2 d2 BcdB|A2F2 A2de|f2d2 e2c2|d4 d4 :|
f2d2 d2ef|g2f2 e2de|f2d2 A2d2|f2df a3g|

f2d2 d2ef|g2f2 e2de|f2d2 e2c2|d4 d4 :|

                       

ARMY AND NAVY. American, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 39. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 66.

                       

ARMSTRONG'S FAREWELL. AKA and see "The Wild Geese [1].”

                       

ARNAUDVILLE TWO-STEP. AKA and see "Two-Step d'Arnaudville." See also related tune "Lake Arthur Stomp [1]."

                       

ARNDILLY'S REEL. AKA and see "Canty Brody/Body." Scottish, Reel. John Glen finds the piece first published in Angus Cumming's 1780 collection (pg. 8).

                       

ARNE'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. John Glen finds the piece first published in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection (pg. 60).

                       

ARNISTON HOUSE. Scottish, Air (6/8 time). C Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Arniston House, Gorebridge, Midlothian, Scotland, is a Georgian mansion designed by architect William Adam, and built between 1726 and 1750. Adam was commissioned by the third Lord Arniston, Robert Dundas. Arniston House remains a residence of the Dundas family. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 320. Gow (Fourth Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels), 2nd ed., originally 1800; pgs. 6-7.

X:1

T:Arniston House

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slow”

B:Gow – Fourth Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels (1800)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Cmin

Ccc “tr”c2G|~B2G FDB,|Ccc ~c2G|(cd).e (ed).c|Ccc “tr”c2=A|B2G FDB,|”tr”E3 {G}FEF|GEC C2:||

a|g2c “tr”c>de|{e}dcB fdB|(gf)g c>de/f/|(ga).f gec|{a}gfg cde|{e}dcB fed|~e>fg {g}fed|gec c2a|

g2c cde|{e}dcB fdB|(gf).g c>de/f/|(ga).f gec|(gc’).g (eg).e|(fb).f def|”tr”E>FG “tr”D>EF|GEC C2||

                       

ARNOLD KENNEDY’S JIG.  Canadian, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’.

X:1

T:Arnold Kennedy’s Jig

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

K:G

Bc^c|:d^cd b2f|agf gdB|DGB edB|c3 cBc|D2F A2d|1

fag f2e|d^cd ed=c|B3 Bc^c:|2 fag f2d|cAF DEF|G[GB][GB] [G2B2]z||

|:G,B,D G2B|d3 d^cd|DGB edB|c3 cBc|D2F A2d|1fag f2e|

d^cd ed=c|BBB BzG,:|2 fag f2d|cAF DEF|G2z Bc^c||

 

ARNOLD VAN PELT’S TUNE. Old-Time, Breakdown. Copper Creek CCCD-0196, Tom, Brad & Alice – “We’ll Die in the Pig Pen Fighting.”

                       

ARNOLD’S DUCK. Irish, Jig. D Major (‘A’ part) & B Minor (‘B’ part). Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 52, pg. 27.

X:1

T: Arnold's Duck

C: © B.Black

Q: 300

R: jig

M: 6/8

L: 1/8

K: D

A | d2 F AFE | DFB AFE | dcd FAd | BAF E2 A |

d2 F AFE | DEF ABA | dfa gfe | dBB B2 :|

A | BFF cAA | dcd efe | fBB gBB | afe cBA |

BFF cAA | dcd efg | faf ece | dBB B2 :|

                       

ARON'S MAGGOT. English, Country Dance Tune (cut time). England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard tuning. AABBCC. A maggot was a longways country dance from late 16th century England, often dedicated to a personage whose name appears in the title. The term comes from the Italian magioletta and means a plaything, or a slight thing of little consequence. Another meaning for maggot was as another name for a dram, a small unit of liquid measure. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987; No. 241.

                       

AROUND KILLAVILLE. Irish, Double Jig. E Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. An unsual spelling for the Sligo town of Killavil. Source for notated version: Brendan Mulvihill (Baltimore, Md.) [Mulvihill]. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 89, pg. 83.

                       

AROUND THE HOUSE AND MIND THE DRESSER. Irish, Slide (12/8 time).  D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Ciaran Carson references the title in his book Last Night’s Fun (1996), in regards to his observations on the spatial changes a room undergoes during a ceili:

***

When a ceili is made the dimensions of the room change subtly as the

talk includes some news of the outside world. Music starts up, and the

dimensions alter once again as dancers take the floor and those not

dancing make space and squeeze up against each other, backs to the

wall. ‘Around the House and Mind the Dresser’. The room seems to

expand or contract in Tardis-like defiance of the laws of time and space. (pg. 114)

***

House dances, popular in the years before the move to dance-halls in Ireland, were held in the central room of a cottage—the kitchen. Table, chairs, benches and other pieces of furniture were moved to the walls, leaving room for a set in the middle. Donal Hickey, in his book Stone Mad for Music (1999), recalls a time that Sliabh Luachra musicians Pádraig O’Keeffe and Paddy Cronin played a house dance in Cordal.  The hostess, noting her rather cramped quarters and seeking to conserve space for dancing, asked the pair to mount chairs set on the top of a table and play there. “Christ, Paddy,” said O’Keeffe, “we’ll g’up in the gallery”—and there they played. 

***

Shanachie 79026, Chieftains - “Bonaparte’s Retreat.” Shanachie SHA79027, the Chieftains - “Live.”

X:1

T:Around the House and Mind the Dresser

M:12/8

L:1/8

C:D Major

S:Trad.

R:slide

D:Chieftains "Live”

Z:Gary Chapin

K:D

g|f2d A2=c B2A G2g|f2d ABc d3 d2g|f2d A2=c B2A G3|fag fBc d3 d2:!:a|

f2g agf e2f gfe|f2g agf e3 g3|f2g agf e2f g2{a}g|gfe ABc d3 d2:||

                       

AROUND THE HOUSES. English, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. A modern composition by Tony Doyle, a member of the Plain Brown Wrapper Band. Plain Brown Tune Book, 1997; pg. 4.

 

AROUND THE LAKE.  American, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by New Hampshire fiddler Randy Miller, who says “It’s a three mile walk around Lake Warren in (his home town) East Alstead.” Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 114, pg. 78.

                       


AROUND THE WORLD [1]. AKA and see “The Highland Man That Kissed his Grannie [1],” “Jolly Seven,” “Miss Kelly's.” American, Reel. C Major ('A' part) & A Minor ('B' part). Standard tuning. AABB. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 29. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 54.

X:1

T:Around the World [1]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

c2 ec gcec | c2 ec dBGB | c2 ec gcec | afge dBGB :|

|: ceAe ceAe | ceAe dBGB | ceAe ceAe | afge dBGB :|

AROUND THE WORLD [2]. AKA and see “All Around the World,” “Cooley’s (Reel) [2],” “The Connemara Rake,” “Doherty’s (Reel) [2],” “Grehan’s,” “John Doherty’s Reel [1],” “Johnny Doherty’s Reel [1],” “Jolly Beggar [2],” “Matt Molloy’s [1],” “The Mistress,” “Mot Malloy,” “Tinker Doherty’s,” “The Wise Maid [1]."

                       

(A)ROUND THE WORLD FOR SPORT [1] (Mor-timcioll an Doman l'e h-Aeract). AKA - “Round the World [1].” AKA and see "Diversion Everywhere," "Fairies are Dancing." Irish, Reel. G Major ('A' part) & E Minor ('B' part). Standard tuning. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AA'B (O'Neill/Krassen): AABB (Kerr, Levey): AABBCCDD (Kennedy). Kennedy (Traditional Dance Music of Britain and Ireland: Rants & Reels), 1997; No. 1, pg. 3. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 19, pg. 35. Levey (Dance Music of Ireland, 2nd Collection), 1873; No. 54, pg. 23. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 139. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1442, pg. 267. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 679, pg. 120. Hemisphere 7243 8 31216 25, The Bothy Band - “Celtic Graces” (1994). Mulligan, The Bothy Band - “Out of the Wind into the Sun” (1977).

X:1

T:Around the World for Sport [1]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – 1001 Gems (1907), No. 679

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

GFGB A2 dc | BdAc BEEF | GFGB A2 dc | BGAG FDEF |GFGB A2 dc |

(3Bcd Ac BEEF | G2 {A}GF GAB^c| dBAG FD D || f | gfef g2 ef|geag fddf |

gfef gfed | BdAG FDDf | gfef g2 bg | fgag fddf | gbaf gfed | (3B^cd AG FDEF ||

 

(A)ROUND THE WORLD FOR SPORT [2]. AKA and see “Conlon’s Dream,” “Little Pig Lamenting the Empty Trough,” “Sword in (the) Hand.” Irish, Reel. G Major (‘A’ part) & D Major (‘B’ part). Standard tuning. AA’BB. Vallely (Armagh Pipers Club Play 50 Reels), 1982; No. 17, pg. 10.

See also listing at: 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

 

(A)ROUND THE WORLD FOR SPORT [3]. Irish, March (6/8 time) or Single Jig. G Major/E Minor. Standard tuning. AB (Stanford/Petrie): AABB (Joyce, O’Neill). A 6/8 rendering of version #1. O’Neill’s version is nearly identical to that printed earlier by Howe and Joyce. Source for notated versions: “Taken down in 1850 from Ned Goggin of Glenosheen, in the county Limerick” [P.W. Joyce]; “Set from Edward Goggin, Glenosheen. (From the Irish collector) Mr. Joyce” [Stanford/Petrie]. Howe (1000 Jigs and Reels), c. 1867; pg. 19. Joyce (Ancient Irish Music), 1873; No. 70, pg. 71. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 958, pg. 241. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1828, pg. 343.

X:1

T:Around the World for Sport [3]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:March or Single Jig

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 679

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G3G3|ABA A2G|B3 BAG|B2E E2F|G3 G3|ABA ABc|d2A BAG|F2D D2z:|

|:g3 e2f|g3 e2f|g2e a2g|f2d d2f|g2d d2f|g2e a2f|g2e edc|BcB BAG|F2D D2z:|

 

(A)ROUND THE WORLD FOR SPORT [4]. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. O’Farrell (National Irish Music for the Union Pipes), 1804; pg. 28.

X:1

T:Round the World for Sport [4]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:O’Farrell – National Irish Music for the Union Pipes (1804)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D | GBB BAB | GBd def | gfe edB | dBA A2B | GBB BAB |

GBd def | gfe edB | dBG G2 || def gfg | abg fed | gfe edB |

dBA A2B | GBB BAB | GBd def | gfe edB | AGG G2 ||

                                   

AROUND THE WORLD ON A DIME. Old-Time, Blues. USA, Missouri. C Major. Standard tuning. AA’B. A unique tune in the repertoire of southern Missouri fiddler Ray Curbow, who said he learned it in the 1970’s from Ozark, Missouri, fiddler Johnny Boyd. Curbow told Mark Wilson the story that Boyd and his brother were sitting on their home porch playing, when a black man walked by with a fiddle in his sack. Hearing the brothers, he approached and asked if he could sit in, eventually playing this tune for them. Source for notated version: Ray Curbow (b. 1936, southern Missouri) [Beisswenger & McCann]. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozark Fiddle Music), 2008; pg. 178. Rounder 0436, Ray Curbow – “Traditional Fiddle Music of the Ozarks, vol. 2: On the Springfield Plain” (2000).

                                   

ARQUENNIERE, L'. French, Polka. France, Central France. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Stevens (Massif Central), 1987; No. 112.

                                   

ARRA KITTY BE EASY. See the "An Bothar o thuaidh go dti Arainn" (South Road to Aran) and “Billy O’Rouke’s the Buachaill [1]” family of tunes. See "Kitty be Aisy"???

                                   

ARRAGH MOUNTAINS. AKA - “Arra Mountains.” Irish, Slip Jig. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB’. Composed by Paddy O’Brien (1922-1981) of Newtown, Co. Tipperary), recorded on his E.P. “The Banks of the Shannon” (1973, with Seamus Connolly and Charlie Lennon). The Arra Mountains are in County Tipperary, on the eastern shore of Lough Derg. Drumlin Records BMNCD2, Brian McNamara – “Fort of the Jewels” (2004). Klang Welten Records, Gráinne Hambly – “Golden Lights and Green Shadows” (2003). Philo FI 20188, "Jean Carignan Plays the Music of Coleman, Morrison & Skinner."

                       

ARRAH MY DEAR EVELEEN (Ara Mo Eiblin Dileas). AKA and see "Silent O Moyle!" "Song of Finnula." Irish, Air (4/4 time). A Minor. Standard tuning. AB. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 376, pg. 65.

X:1

T:Arrah My Dear Eveleen!

M:C

L:1/8

N:”Tenderly”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 376

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Amin

c2 c>c cBBB|AcBA ^G E2 z|A2 A>A ^G<E zE|A2 B>B c2 zB|

c2 ec cBcB|AcBA ^G E2 z|A2 A>A cBA^G|A2 B>B c2 z2||

ABcd e2 ze|f2 ed eA z2|A3A f3e|d2c2B2 z2|

e3A A2 zc|BcBA ^G E2 z|A3 A cBA^G|A2 B>B c2 z2||

                       

ARRAN AIR (Fonn n-Arainn). Irish, Air (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AB. A tune by this generic title appears in Hoffman’s 1877 arrangement of melodies from the George Petrie collection--it is in actuallity “Cill Chais.” O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 541, pg. 94.

X:1

T:Arran Air

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 541

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A/F/ | DF/G/ AB/c/ | d/e/f/d/ ed/B/ | AA/B/ A/F/ d/e/ | fe e2 A/F/ | DF/G/ AB/c/ |

d/e/f/d/ ed/B/ | AA/B/ A/F/D/F/ | ED D2 || A/F/ | A/B/d/e/ fe/f/ | g/e/f/d/ ed/e/ |

fe d/B/A/F/ | FE EA/F/ | DF/G/ AB/c/ | d/e/f/d/ ed/B/ | AA/B/ A/F/D/F/ | ED D2 ||

           

ARRAN BOAT, THE. AKA and see "The Highland Boat Song." Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). E Dorian. Standard tuning. AAB. The Island of Arran lies off the southwest coast of Scotland in the Firth of Clyde, and should not to be confused with the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; No. 2, pg. 47. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 1, 1991; pg. 11. Shanachie Records 79017, John & Phil Cunningham ‑ "Against the Storm" (1980).

X:1

T:Arran Boat, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

B:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 1, pg. 47  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

E>FE B>^cd|A<FD A<FD|E>FE B>^cd|F<EF E2:||

e>fe {f}g>fe|d>BG A>FD|e>fe {f}g>fe |^dB>d e2B|

e>fe {f}g>fe|d>BG A>FD|E>FE B>^cd|F>EF E2||

                       

ARRAN LILT, AN. Scottish, Air (2/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; No. 8, pg. 47.

X:1

T:Arran Lilt, An

M:2/4

L:1/8

B:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 1, pg. 47  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

(3A/B/c/|d>B G>A|A(3c/B/A/ Bd|e(3f/e/d/ gB|A/G/A/B/ A(3A/B/c/|d>B G>A|

B(3c/B/A/ Bd|e(3f/e/d/ gB|A/G/A/B/ G::d|gg/e/ ff/d/|ee/d/ Bd|gg/e/ ff/d/|

ee/d/ Bd|gg/e/ ff/d/|ee/d/ Bd|e(3f/e/d/ gB|A/G/A/B/ A2:|

                       


ARRANE GHELBY. Scottish, Slow Air or Waltz. Scotland, Isle of Man. B Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Source for notated version: Scottish style fiddler Elke Baker (Washington, D.C.) [Matthiesen]. Mattheisen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 35.

 

ARRANMORE FERRY, THE. AKA and see “Staten Island (Hornpipe).” Irish, Hornpipe.

 

ARRANMORE TUNE, AN. See “Lament for Eoghan Rua.”

 

ARRAVALE ROVERS, THE. Irish, Quadrille. G Major & D Major. Standard tuning. Five parts plus trios. Roche Collection, 1982; vol. III, pg. 75‑76.

 

ARROCHAR BRIDGE. Canadian, Reel. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Major. AEae tuning. AAB. Dunlay & Greenberg state the reel is often associated with “The Bridge of Bamore.” Sources for notated versions: Carl MacKenzie (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]; Allan MacDonald (b. c. 1950, Bangor, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlamn]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 136. Dunlay & Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music of Cape Breton), 1986; No. 13, pg. 36 (appears as “A High Bass Reel”). Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 99. Sea-Cape Music ACR4-12940, Buddy MacMaster - “Judique on the Floor” (1989. Appears as “Traditional Reel”). NQD-5447, Doug MacPhee - “Cape Breton Master of the Keyboard” (appears as “Traditional High Bass Reel”). WRC1-1548, Carl MacKenzie - “And His Sound is Cape Breton” (1981. Appears as “Traditional Reel”). WRC1-6100, Atlantica 04 50222, Kyle and Lucy MacNeill - “Atlantic Fiddles” (Appears as “Traditional Reel”).

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

 

ART McBRIDE. See “Arthur McBride [2]."

 

ART OG UA DÁLAIG. AKA and see "Young Arthur Daly."

 

ART O’KEEFFE’S POLKA [1]. AKA and see “Carroll’s (Polka).” Irish, Polka. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB. A pentatonic melody. See also the related “Dan Sweeney’s.” Breathnach (CRÉ II), 1976; No. 125 (appears as untitled polka). Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 68.

 

ART O’KEEFFE’S POLKA [2]. AKA and see “The Newmarket (Polka) [3]," “The Sliabh Luachra [2].” Irish, Polka. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Taylor (Traditional Irish Music: Karen Tweed’s Irish Choice), 1994; pg. 37.

 

ART O'KEEFFE'S [1]. AKA and see “The Hare in the Corn [5]." Irish, Slide (12/8 time) or Double Jig. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. Art O’Keeffe was a fiddler and tin whistle player from Gneeveguilla (pronounced “Guinea-gulla”), west Kerry, near Killarney. Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O’Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]. Moylan (Johnny O’Leary), 1994; No. 268, pgs. 152-153. Front Hall 018, How to Change a Flat Tire ‑ "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland" (learned from Kerry fiddler Julia Clifford). Gael-Linn CEF092, Julia and Billy Clifford - “Ceol as Sliabh Luachra.” Ossian OSS CD 130, Sliabh Notes – “Along Blackwater’s Banks” (2002). Topic 12T311, John & Julia Clifford - “Humours of Lisheen.”

 

ART O’KEEFFE’S [2]. AKA and see “Biddy Crowley’s Ball,” “Johnny Mick Dinny’s,” “My Love in the Morning.” Irish, Slide. (May be same tune as “Art O’Keeffe’s” [1]).

 

ART O’KEEFFE’s [3]. AKA and see “Echoes of Killarney.” Irish, Slide. G Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB.

X:1

T:Art O'Keeffe's [3]

T:Echoes of Killarney

D:Denis Murphy, Music from Sliabh Luachra (RTE)

R:slide

M:12/8

Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae

L:1/8

K:G

B2 A|:GEG G2 A B2 d ege|d2 B BAB g2 B BAB|

GEG G2 A B2 d ege|1 d2 B ABA G3 B2 A:|

2 d2 B ABA G3 G3||

|:gfg edd e2 f g2 e|d2 B BAB g2 B BAB|

gfg edd e2 f g3|BcB ABA G3 G3:|

"variation, bars 2 and 6"|d2 B BAB d2 B BAB|

 


ART WOOTEN'S HORNPIPE.  Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. G Major. Standard tuning. AA'BBCCDD (Phillips): AABBCCDD (Christeson). Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler’s Repertory, vol. 1), 1973; pg. 96. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 181. Bee Balm 302, “The Corndrinkers.”

 

ART WOOTEN'S QUADRILLE.  Old‑Time, Quadrille. USA, Nebraska. B Flat Major. Standard. AB. “Art Wooten’s Quadrille” is one of the ‘100 essential Missouri fiddle tunes’ according to Missouri fiddler Charlie Walden. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, vol. 1), 1973; pg. 117.

                       

ARTHUR BERRY. AKA – “Arthur Barry,” “Arthur Barrie.” AKA and see "Yellow Barber" {Ky.). Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA; eastern Kentucky, southern Ohio, Indiana. D Major. Standard or ADae. AABB. Kerry Blech remarks that source John Summers (Indiana) learned the tune from fiddler named Tom Riley, originally from Bath County, Kentucky, who also was a mentor to George Lee Hawkins. Hawkins himself had a great influence on the style and repertoire of Lewis County, Kentucky fiddlers (such as Buddy Thomas and Roger Cooper) and nearby Portsmouth, Ohio, fiddlers (such as Jimmy Wheeler). The tune is known as “Yellow Barber” in the Portsmouth area of Kentucky, however, south and east the “Arthur Barry” title is more common. Blech suggests that Arthur Barry might have been the name of the yellow (mulatto) barber. Source for notated version: John W. Summers (Indiana) [Krassen]. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1983, pg. 131. Rounder Records 0032, Buddy Thomas (under "Yellow Barber"). Rounder Records 0194, John W. Summers ‑ "Indiana Fiddler" (1984).

                       

ARTHUR BIGNALD OF LOCHROSQUE. Scottish, March (2/4 time). A Mixolydian. AABBCCDD’. Composed by John MacColl. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 4, 1991; pg. 30. Beltona 78 RPM 2439, Jimmy Shand.

                       

ARTHUR DARLEY’S. AKA and see “The Bruckless Shore,” “The Swedish Jig.” Irish, Slow Air. Ireland, County Donegal. Gael-Linn CEF060, “Paddy Glackin.”

                                   

ARTHUR McBRIDE [1]. AKA and see "The Castle Street Jig," "The Blackthorn Stick [5]," "The Maid at the Well," "The Black Stripper," "Kilkenny Jig," "The Milkmaid [2]," "The Maids of Glenroe."

 

ART McBRIDE [2]. AKA - "Arthur McBride." Irish, Air or Jig. Ireland; Counties Limerick, Donegal. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. P.W. Joyce’s air “Arthur McBride,” printed in his Old Irish Folk Music and Songs, is almost identical to Petrie’s. Joyce collected his version in Limerick in the 1840's, while Petrie's air comes from County Donegal. John Loesberg (1980) states that several versions of the song have been found variously in Scotland, Suffolk and Devon, though the tunes in most cases differ slightly. John Moulden notes that the first Scottish sets appear to be in Greig Duncan.  Those looking for Paul Brady's famous tune will not find it in older Irish collections, for it was taken from a book of folk songs collected in the state of Maine.

***

I had a first cousin called Arthur McBride, he and I took a stroll down by the seaside,

A-seeking good fortune and what might betide, 'twas just as the day was a dawning.

Then after resting we both took a tramp, we met Sergeant Harper and corporal Cramp,

Besides the wee drummer who beat up for camp, with his rowdy-dow-dow in the morning.

***

Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 846, pg. 211.

X:1

T:Art McBride

M:6/8

L:1/8

N:”A county of Donegal air.”

R:Air

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 846

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D | GAG GDE | GAG GAB | cec BdB | ABG E2D | GDE GDE | GAG Bcd |

edc B{c/B/}AG | “tr”A3 {G/A/}G2 || A/B/ | c2c cde | edd d2B | cdc BdB |

ABG E D>D | GDD EDD | GAG Bcd | edc B{c/B/}AG | “tr”A3 G2 ||

                       

ARTHUR FINLEY. Canadian, Reel. Flying Fish FF70572, Frank Ferrel – “Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England” (1991. Learned from repertoire of Boston/Nova Scotia fiddler Tom Doucet).

                       

ARTHUR MUISE [1]. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. G Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by the late fiddler Jerry Holland (1955-2009, Inverness, Cape Breton) in honor of Cheticamp, Cape Breton, fiddler Arthur Muise. Cranford (Jerry Holland’s), 1995; No. 188, pg. 53. Fiddlesticks cass., Jerry Holland - “A Session with Jerry Holland” (1990). Green Linnett, Jerry Holland - “The Fiddlesticks Collection” (1995). Odyssey ORCS 1051, Jerry Holland – “Fiddler’s Choice” (1999). Rounder Records 7057, Jerry Holland – “Parlor Music” (2005).

 

ARTHUR MUISE [2]. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. A Mixolydian (‘A’ part) & A Dorian/Mixolydian (‘B’ part). Standard tuning. AABB. A modern composition by fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton) in honor of fiddler Arthur Muise (Cheticamp, Cape Breton). Cranford (Brenda Stubbert’s), 1994; No. 5, pg. 2. Brenda Stubbert - “Tamerack ‘er Down” (1985). Rounder RO7023, Natalie MacMaster - “No Boundaries” (1996. Learned from Arthur Muise).

 


ARTHUR MUISE [3]. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB’. Composed by the late fiddler Jerry Holland (1955-2009, Inverness, Cape Breton) for fiddler Arthur Muise (Cheticamp, Cape Breton). Cranford (Jerry Holland’s), 1995; No. 220, pg. 64.

 

ARTHUR MUISE’S [4]. Canadian, Strathspey. CAT-WMR004, Wendy MacIssac - “The ‘Reel’ Thing” (1994).

                       

ARTHUR MURRAY’S REEL. AKA and see “Antony Murray(‘s Reel),” “Christie’s Sister,” “Hills of Cape Mabou,” “Lord Murray’s Strathspey.”

                       

ARTHUR STEVENS THE BLACKSMITH. American, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AA'BB. Source for notated version: Kerry Blech (Seattle, Washington) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 180.

                       

ARTHUR('S) SEAT [1]. Scottish, Hornpipe. B‑Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB (Hardie): AA'BB (Brody). Composed by the famous Scots composer and fiddler J. Scott Skinner, appearing first in his Cairngorm Series (Pt. 6), titled after a prominent Edinburgh landmark, a high volcanic plug. In fact, the name is quite ancient having been first recorded by Giraldus Cambrensis in the 12th century as ‘Cathedra Arturi’ (the Greek word cathedra means throne), and stems from the time the area was Brittonic, prior to the invasions of the Anglo-Saxon tribes. Bill Hardie notes that the cross bowing he indicates in his printed version of the tune "is particularly suited to the chromatic writing in the second strain." Skinner recorded the tune in the early 1920’s as part of “The Celebrated Hornpipes” medley.

***

Arthur’s Seat

***

Source for notated version: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 26. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 39. Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel – “Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England” (1991). Folkways FG3531, Jean Carignan‑ "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (first tune of 'Bank'). Great Meadow Music GMM 2002, Rodney Miller & David Surette – “New Leaf” (2000). Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (first tune of 'Banks Medley'). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner‑ "The Strathspey King."

 

ARTHUR'S SEAT [2]. Scottish, Reel. E Major. Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833), first published in his 1781 Collection. Susan Cowie, in her book The Life and Times of William Marshall (1999), writes that Marshall, in his position of House Steward for Gordon Castle, accompanied the Duke of Gordon and his family on their frequent trips to Edinburgh. It was the Duke’s custom to climb Arthur’s Seat on the first of May with his old friend, Professor Andrew Duncan, a habit they continued into Duncan’s eightieth year. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; pg. 2 of 1781 Collection and pg. 38 of 1822 Collection.

X:1

T:Arthur’s Seat [2]

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Marshall – 1822 Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:E

EGBe gfeg|fgag f/f/f f2|EGBe gfed|ecBG E/E/E E2:|

|:cBeB cBAG|AcBG F/F/F F2|cBeB cBAG|AcBG E/E/E E:|

|:egBg faBa|g>abg f/f/f f2|egBg faBa|g>abg e/e/e e2:|

|:edcB cBAG|AcBG F/F/F F2|edcB cBAG|A>c B<G E/E/E E2:|

 

ARTHUR'S SEAT [3]. Scottish, Reel. B Minor. Standard tuning. AB. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 133.

X:1

T:Arthur’s Seat [3]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)
Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bmin

c|BF F/F/F d2de|cAeA fedc|BF F/F/F d2de|fedc dBBc|BF F/F/F d2de|

cBAa fedc|BF F/F/F d2de|fedc dBB||c|Bbba gfed|caed cAAc|Bbba gfed|

caec dBBc|Bbba gfed|caed cAAc|BFBc dcde|fedc dBB||

 

ARTHUR'S SEAT [4]. Scottish, Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). A tune by this name (version #3???) appears in the Bodleian Manuscript, inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland written at Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740" which is located in the Bodleian Library, Oxford.

                       

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

Please help maintain the viability of the Fiddler’s Companion on the Web by respecting the copyright.

For further information see Copyright and Permissions Policy or contact the author.

 

 


 [COMMENT1]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT2]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - On.

 [COMMENT3]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT4]Note:  The change to pitch (12) and font (1) must be converted manually.