The Fiddler’s Companion

© 1996-2009 Andrew Kuntz

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

[COMMENT1] [COMMENT2] 

BI - BILE

[COMMENT3] 

 

Notation Note: The tunes below are recorded in what is called “abc notation.” They can easily be converted to standard musical notation via highlighting with your cursor starting at “X:1” through to the end of the abc’s, then “cutting-and-pasting” the highlighted notation into one of the many abc conversion programs available, or at concertina.net’s incredibly handy “ABC Convert-A-Matic” at

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html 

 

**Please note that the abc’s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc conversion programs. For example, I use abc2win and abcNavigator 2 with no problems whatsoever with direct cut-and-pasting. However, due to an anomaly of the html, pasting the abc’s into the concertina.net converter results in double-spacing. For concertina.net’s conversion program to work you must remove the spaces between all the lines of abc notation after pasting, so that they are single-spaced, with no intervening blank lines. This being done, the F/C abc’s will convert to standard notation nicely. Or, get a copy of abcNavigator 2 – its well worth it.   [AK]

 

 

[COMMENT4] 

BÍ AG BUAIDREAD, NA. AKA and see "Don't Be Teasing."

 

BÍ AG TREABHADH LEAT. AKA and see "Speed the Plow/Plough [1]."

           

BI FALBH ANNS A MHIONAID (Go Immediately). AKA and see “Weary We Have Been.” Canadian, Scottish; Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. A variant of the Cape Breton version of the tune is published by the Scots Guards under the title “Weary We Have Been.” Shears’ setting is from the music manuscript of Captain Angus J. MacNeil of Gillis Point, Cape Breton, compiled in 1915. According to Shears (1986) MacNeil was an officer-piper with the 94th Regiment, Victoria Battalion, organized for home defense during World War I. His unit had the distinction of being the only British Empire unit with over 80% of its officers and enlisted being Gaelic speakers! Shears (Gathering of the Clans Collection, vol. 1), 1986; pg. 48 (pipe setting).

                       

BIADANAI, AN (The Cabin Hunter). AKA and see “The Cabin Hunter.”

 

BIB COUNTY HOEDOWN. AKA – “Bibb County Breakdown.” Old-Time, Breakdown. C Major. Standard tuning. AB. In the repertoire of Seven Foot Dilly and His Dill Pickles (A.A. Gray, fiddle), north Georgia, who recorded it in 1930. Bibb County is in Georgia, created in 1822 and named after William Wyatt Bibb (1790-1820), a United States Senator and Governor of the Territory of Alabama. Macon is the county seat. Source for notated version: Greg Canote [Silberberg]. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 8 (appears as “Bibb County Breakdown”).

           

BIBY, LA.  French, Country Dance (2/4 time). C Major (‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘D’ parts) & C Minor (‘C’ part). Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. From the contradance book (tunes with dance instructions) of Robert Daubat (who styled himself Robert d’Aubat de Saint-Flour), born in Saint-Flour, Cantal, France, in 1714, dying in Gent, Belgium, in 1782. According to Belgian fiddler Luc De Cat, at the time of the publication of his collection (1757) Daubat was a dancing master in Gent and taught at several schools and theaters.  He also was the leader of a choir and was a violin player in a theater. Mr. De Cat identifies a list of subscribers of the original publication, numbering 132 individuals, of the higher level of society and the nobility, but also including musicians and dance-masters (including the ballet-master from the Italian opera in London). Many of the tunes are written with parts for various instruments, and include a numbered bass. Daubat (Cent Contredanses en Rond), 1757; No. 5.

X:1

T:Biby, La

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Daubat – Cent Contredanses en Rond (1757), No. 5

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

c>d | c>Gc>d | {d}e2 g>a | g>fe>d | {f}(e/d/c) c>d | c>Gc>d | {d}e2 g>a |

g>fe>d | c2 :: G>A | G>gg>f | “tr”f2 G>A | G>ff>e | “tr”e2 c>d | c>aa>g |

g2 {f}ed/c/ | BcGB| {d} c2 :|

K:C Minor

(e/d/c) | cG (e/d/c) | c2 G>A | G>FE>D | (E/D/C) (e/d/)c | cG e/d/c | c G>A |

G>FE>D | {D}C2 :|

K:C

G>B | B2 G>g | “tr” g2 G>A | G>g {g}f>e | {e}d2 c>d | c>aa>g | {a}g2 {f}ed/c/ |

BcGB | {d}c2 :|

                       

BICYCLE [1], THE. Irish, Slide. Ireland, Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border. E Dorian. Standard tuning. AB. A kind of slip-slide local to Sliabh Luachra, often performed for dancing by Johnny O’Leary. O’Leary remarks that the tune is “kind of slip slide, if you like”--similarities to a slip jig and a slide. He remembers that the associated dance had a double wheel at the end:

***

If they were slow dancers they wouldn’t be able to do it then,

do you see. They’d be falling around the house. They couldn’t

get the double wheel at all. They’d be hitting against each

other. The one that could double could do it now, you could

do the double, swinging easy, like. But the one that couldn’t

do that is caught in that slide, if you play it fast.    (Moylan)

***

O’Leary associates the tune with a particular figure of the Sliabh Luachra set, and usually reserves it for the fifth figure and regards only fairly competent dancers can cope with it. Source for notated version: recorded February, 1973, in Ballydesmond from the playing of accordion player Johnny O’Leary (Sliabh Luachra), who had the tune from Mickin Dálaigh [Moylan]. Moylan (Johnny O’Leary) 1994; No. 15, pg. 10.

X:1

T:The Bicycle

M:12/8

L:1/8

Q:160

R:slide

D:Johnny O'Leary of Sliabh Luachra

D:Brendan Begley, "We Won't Go Home Till Morning"

Z:Lorna LaVerne

K:E Aeolian

|:”Em”B2 E E2 F G2 E E3| B2 E E2 F “D”A3 F2 A |

“Em”B2 E E2 F G2 E E2 A | B2 A “Bm”d2 B “Am”A3 “D”F2 A:|

|:”Em”B2e e2d “Bm”B2A “D”F2A|”Em”Bee e2f “Bm”d3 B2A|

“Em”Bee e^de “Bm”B2A “D”=d2B|A^GA “Bm”D2F “Am”A3 “D”F2A:|

"variation, bars 7 and 8"| Bee efe B2A d2B|ABA D2F A3 A2F|

 

BICYCLE [2], THE. Irish, Reel. Ireland, Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border. E Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. A reel-time version of “The Bicycle” [1]. Source for notated version: fiddler Denis Murphy (Sliabh Luachra); after Johnny O’Leary played the slide version of “The Bicycle [1]," Denis Murphy, in attendance at the same 1973 Ballydesmond session, demonstrated the reel version [Moylan]. Moylan (Johnny O’Leary), 1994; No. 16, pg. 11.

 

BIDDLESTONE HORNPIPE, THE.  English, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Northumbrian piper Billy Pigg (1902-1968). Biddlestone is a hamlet in Coquetdale, Northumberland, where Pigg lived for a time. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 275, pg. 165. Northumbrian Pipers’ Second Tune Book, 1981. Pauline Cato – “New Tyne Bridge.” Topic 12TS445, The High Level Ranters – “Four in a Bar” (1979).

 

BIDDY BARRY. Irish, Schottische. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Roche Collection, 1982; vol. 3, No. 158, pg. 53.

 

BIDDY CROWLEY’S BALL. AKA and see “Art O’Keeffe’s [2],” “Johnny Mick Dinny’s,” “Mo Ghrasa Ar Maidin,” “My Love in the Morning.”

 


BIDDY EARLY (Brigidin Ni Maelmoceirige). Irish, Hornpipe. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABB. Early in the 20th century Irish immigrants from County Clare were called (somewhat derisively) ‘Biddy Early’s’. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 946, pg. 162.

X:1

T:Billy Early

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 946

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A Dorian

(3GAB|c2 cB cdeg|dedB GABd|cA (3AAA ecAc|edBA GABd|

c2 cA cdeg|dedB GABd|cBAg edcB|c2A2A2:|

|:ef|gfga gedc|BcdB GABd|agab agea|gede cdef|

geaf gedB|cBAB cdea|gfge dfed|c2A2A2:|

 

BIDDY FROM LIMERICK (Brigidin ua Luimnaig). Irish, Slip Jig. D Major/Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABB. O'Neill (Krassen); pg. 85. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1161, pg. 219.

X:1

T:Biddy From Limerick

M:9/8

L:1/8

R:Slip Jig

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 1161

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

F2D A2F def | F2D A2F GFE | F2D A2F def | g2f e2d cBA :|

|: ABA d2A def | ABA d2A GFE | ABA d2A def | g2f e2d cBA :|

           

BIDDY FROM MUCKCROSS. Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. The tune is associated with the KIilcar region of County Donegal, explains piper Brian McNamara, who says ‘Biddy’ was a lilter from the headland of Muckross, near Kilcar. She lilted at dances when there were no fiddles available [see also Caoimhin Mac Aoidh, Between the Jigs and the Reels]. Drumlin Records BMNCD2, Brian McNamara – “Fort of the Jewels” (2004). Larraga Records, MMR112000, Mike & Mary Rafferty – “The Road to Ballinakill” (2001).

X:1
T:Biddy from Muckcross
C:from Robbie Hannan
O:Donegal
R:reel
B:J. Schiefner "Queen of Diamonds) p. 21
Z:id:js_638
M:4/4
K:D
BGB|ADDE FAAc|d2fd BGBd|ADDE FAed|BdAG FDDB|
ADDE FAAc|dgfd BGBd|ADDE FAed|BdAG FDDf||
a{b}afd Adfg|ad (3.g.f.d cdef|a{b}afa gfed|BdAG FDDf|
a{b}afd Adfg|adfd cdef|gbaf gece|dBAG FDDF|]

           

BIDDY FROM SLIGO. AKA and see “Biddy of Sligo.”

 

BIDDY, I'M NOT JESTING. Irish (originally), New England; March (4/4 or 2/4 time). G Major (O’Neill, Reiner & Anick): A Flat Major (Stanford/Petrie). Standard tuning. AB (Stanford/Petrie): AABB (O'Neill): AA'BB'AB (Reiner & Ancik). Sources for notated versions: piper Paddy Coneely (Galway) [Stanford/Petrie]; Adirondack, New York, fiddler and former lumberjack Larry Older via Rodney Miller (Antrim, N.H.) [Reiner & Anick]. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1817, pg. 341. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 67. Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 47. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 307, pg. 77.

X:1

T:Biddy I'm Not Jesting

M:4/4

L:1/8

S:Capt. F. O'Neill

Z:Paul Kinder

K:G

D2|DEGA B2 AG|AGAB d2 BG|E2 DB, DEGA|B2 A>A A2 D2|

DEGA B2 AG|AGAB d2 BG|E2 DB, DEGA|B2 G>G G2:|

|:D2|GABd e2 ge|dBGE c2 Bc|dBGE DEGA|B2 A>A A2 D2|

DEGA B2 AG|AGAB d2 BG|E2 DB, DEGA|B2 G>G G2:||

 

BIDDY IS MY DARLING. Irish, Air (6/8 time). G Major. Standard. AA'BB. The unrelated, but similarly-titled slide “Biddy the Darling” is below. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 564, pg. 99.

X:1

T:Biddy is My Darling

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Cheerfully”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 564

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

d|BzG czA|BdB Gzd|ezc ezf|{z}gfe d2f|gfe dcB|edc BAG|1

FGA ABc BcB A2:|2 FGA ABA|G3 G2||

|:d|gzd Bcd|efg dzd|gzf efg|age dzd|gaz bag|efg d2c|BAG FGA|G3 G2:|

 

BIDDY MALONEY (Brigidin Ni Maoldomnaig). AKA and see “Malowney's/Maloney’s Wife.” Irish, Double Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABBCCDDEEFFGG. Source for notated version: from the manuscript collection of retired businessman and Irish music enthusiast John Gillan, collected from musicians in his home county of Longford and the adjoining Leitrim [O’Neill]. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1010, pg. 188. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 224, pg. 51.

X:1

T:Biddy Maloney

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 224

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A/G/|FGA AFA|AFA AFA|BGG AGF|BGE EGE|

FGA AFA|AFA d2A|B/c/dB Afd|AFD D2:|

|:c/d/|ecA AcA|ecA d2A|GBG FGA|BGE E2 c/d/|ecA dfa|gfe d2A|dcB AFd|AFD D2:|

|:f/g/|a3g3|fed cBA|GBG FGA|BGE E2 f/g/|agf gbg|fed cBA|dcB AFd|AFD D2:|

|:f/g/|af/g/a/f/ dfg|af/g/a/f/ dga|bg/a/b/g/ ega|bg/a/b/g/ efg|af/g/a/f/ bgg|af/g/a/f/ d2A|

B/c/dB AFd|AFD D2:|

|:A|d/e/dc dAF|d/e/dc dAF|GBG FGA|BGE E2A|d/e/dc dAF|d/e/dc dAF|dcd efg|fdd d2:|

|:g|f/g/ab afd|fdf/g/ afd|g2e f2d|efe efg|f/g/ab afd|f/d/fg afd|gfg eag|fdd d2:|

|:g|fdf ece|dcB AGF|GBG FGA|BGE E2g|fdf ece|dcB AGF|B/c/dB AFd|AFD D2:|

X:2

T:Biddy Maloney

R:jig

Z:id:hn-jig-243

Z:transcribed by henrik.norbeck@mailbox.swipnet.se

M:6/8

L:1/8

K:D

F2A AFA|ABA FED|GBG FGA|BGE EAG|

F2A AFA|AFA d2A|Bcd edB|1 AFD D2E:|2 AFD D2d||

|:ecA Bcd|ecA AGF|GBG FGA|BGE E2d|

ecA Bcd|ecA d2A|Bcd edB|1 AFD D2d:|2 AFD D2f||

|:~g3 ~f3|gfe def|~g3 fga|bge e2f|

~g3 ~f3|gfe d2A|Bcd edB|1 AFD D2f:|2 AFD D2E||

 

BIDDY MARTIN (Bidí Mháirtín). AKA and see "(Hi) Betty Martin," "Tip Toe Fine." Irish, Polka. D Major. Standard tuning. AB (Breathnach): AABB (Mallinson). Breathnach (1985) said his source, Leahy, told him this tune was much referred to in dancing schools as the steps of the reel set to it were easy for youngsters.

***

Hie, Biddy Martin, tip toe, tip toe,

Hie, Biddy Martin, tip toe, tie.

***

Source for notated version: accordion player Tim Leahy, 1968 (Listowel, Co. Kerry, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 111, pg. 62. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 39, pg. 15. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. Learned from accordion player Jackie Daly).

                       

BIDDY MICKEY’S. AKA and see “The Humours of Tuamgraney,” “Tuamgraney Castle.” Outlet OAS 3002, Paddy Cronin - "Kerry's Own Paddy Cronin" (1977),

                       

BIDDY OATS. American, Quickstep (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. In 1862 Bruce and Emmett’s Drummers’ and Fifers’ Guide was published to help codify and train the hordes of new musicians in Union Army service early in the American Civil War. George Bruce was a drum major in the New York National Guard, 7th Regiment, and had served in the United States Army as principal drum instructor at the installation at Governor’s Island in New York harbor. Emmett was none-other than Daniel Decatur Emmett, a principal figure in the mid-19th century minstrel craze and composer of “Dixie” (ironically turned into a Confederate anthem during the war) and “Old Dan Tucker,” among other favorites. Emmett had been a fifer for the 6th U.S. Infantry in the mid-1850’s. Bruce & Emmett’s Drummers’ and Fifers’ Guide, 1862; pg. 56. Sweet (Fifer’s Delight), 1964; pg. 54.

X:1

T:Biddy Oats

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Quickstep March

S:Bruce & Emmett’s Drummers’ & Fifers’ Guide  (1862)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

(3A/B/c/ | df/d/ Ad/A/ | FA/F/ DA | d/c/B/A/ g/f/e/d/ | d/f/c/e/ d/c/B/A/ |

df/d/ Ad/A/ | FA/F/ De/f/ | g/e/f/d/ e/c/d/B/ | A/d/A/F/ D :: f/e/ | dF/G/ Ag/f/ |

eE/F/ Gf/e/ | d/A/F/A/ g/f/e/d/ | c/e/d/B/ Af/e/ | d/A/B/c/ d/A/g/f/ |

e/d/c/d/ e/A/a/g/ | f/e/d/c/ B/g/e/c/ | dfd :|

                       

BIDDY OF BARNES.. Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. McGuire & Keegan (Irish Tunes by the 100), 1975; No. 74, pg. 20.

                       


BIDDY OF SLIGO. AKA and see “Biddy from Sligo,” "Kitty O'Lynn." Irish, Double Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB (Jarman, Kennedy, Kerr): AA’BB’ (Songer). As “Biddy from Sligo” it is a popular jig in County Donegal. Source for notated version: Sean Smyth (Ireland) via Dan Compton (Portland, Oregon) [Songer]. Jarman, Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes; No. or pg. 18. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), vol. 2; No. 37. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; No. 6, pg. 36. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 28 (appears as “Biddy from Sligo”). Bellbridge Records, Bobby Casey – “Casey in the Cowhouse” (1992. Originally recorded 1959). Sean Smyth - “The Blue Fiddle” (appears under the title “Soweto Slide”).

                       

BIDDY ROWAN. Irish, Air (4/4 time). E Minor. Standard tuning. One part. "From a MS. lent by Denny Lane of Cork" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 777, pg. 380.

X:1

T:Biddy Rowan

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:E Minor

.e.e.e.e e3d | e3f g3e | edBA G2 EF | G3A G2 zA | BBBA Bgfg | e3f d2 BA | G2 BE E3E | E6F2 |

GFED E3F | G3F EFGA | .B.BBA G3A | B3A G3A | BBBA Bgfg | e3fd2BA | GB E2 E3E | E6 z2 ||

 

BIDDY THE BOWL WIFE. AKA – “Biddy the Boul Wife.” English, Irish; Jig. A Major. Standard. AABB. Kennedy, Vol. 2, 1954; pg. 34. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; No. 15, pg. 37. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 110.

X:1

T:Biddy the Boul Wife

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

K:G

DGB d2 e|dBG g2e|dBG DGB|cAA A2d|DGB d2 e|dBG g2e|dBG DEF|AGG G3:|

|:ded g2f|agf efg|dBG DGB|cAA A3|ded g2f|agf efg|dBG DEF|AGG G3:|

 

BIDDY THE DARLING (Bidí an Muirnín).  Irish, Single Jig (12/8 time). D Major. Standard. AA’BB’. See also the related “Rosie Finn’s Favourite,” recorded by the Bothy Band. Source for notated version: fiddler Tom Barrett (Listowel, County Kerry) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRÉ V), 1999; No. 68, pg. 35. Howe (500 Irish Melodies, Ancient and Modern), c. 1870.

 

BIDDY'S WEDDING (Posad Brigidin). Irish, Double Jig. C Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (Krassen); pg. 56. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 985, pg. 183. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 201, pg. 47.

X:1

T:Biddy’s Wedding

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 201

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

c>dc c2c|ceg gec|c>dc c2c|B>cd dBG|c>dc c2c|ceg gec|faf ege|B>cd dBG:|

|:c>dc g2c|e2c g2c|c>dc g2c|B>cd dBG|c>dc bge|edc gec|faf ege|B>cd dBG:|

 

BIDE YE YET [1]. Scottish, Jig. C Major ('A' part) & A Minor ('B' part). Standard. AAB. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 164, pg. 97.

 

BIDE YE YET [2]??? Scottish. AKA and see "Crowdie," "Three Times Crowdie in One Day," "The Wayward Wife," "O That I Had Ne'er Been Married." See notes for "Lost Indian [7]" (G Major). Bayard thinks the 'A' strain resembles the 'A' strain in his "Lost Indian [7].”

 

BIDE YE YET [3]. Scottish, Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 2, pg. 32.

 

BIDFORD TOWN MORRIS. English, Morris Dance Tune (6/8 time). C Major. Standard. AABB. A 'morris on' tune. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pg. 61.

 

BIDH CLANN ULAIDH (Men of Ulster). Irish, Air. A Gaelic lullaby which tells the baby that pipes will be played, wine drunk and the children of kings will be present at his wedding. Culburnie CUL 113D, Alasdair Fraser & Tony MacManus – “Return to Kintail” (1999).

 

BIDÍ A’ MHUC ROS [1]. Irish, Slip Jig. One of the tunes learned from two fairy fiddlers by Bidi a’ Mhuc Ros, a Donegal lilter who lived at Muckros Head near Kilcar. See also note for “Bean a’ Tigh ar Lar [1].”

 

BIDÍ A’ MHUC ROS [2]. Irish, March. One of the tunes learned from two fairy fiddlers by Bidi a’ Mhuc Ros, a Donegal lilter who lived at Muckros Head near Kilcar.

 

BIDÍ A’ MHUC ROS [3]. Irish, Hornpipe. One of the tunes learned from two fairy fiddlers by Bidi a’ Mhuc Ros, a Donegal lilter who lived at Muckros Head near Kilcar.

 

BIDÍ AN MUIRNÍN.  AKA and see “Biddy the Darling.”

 

BIDÍ MHÁIRTÍN. AKA and see "Biddy Martin."

           

BIELBIE’S HORNPIPE.  AKA and see “Curlew Hills (Polka).” English, Hornpipe. From the playing of Borders musicians Willie Taylor and Joe Hutton. The tune is a member of a large tune family that, in Northumberland, goes by the name “Beilby’s Hornpipe,” or “Bielbie’s Hornpipe.” The name is used in the early 18th century slang term “Beilby’s Ball,” referring to a hanging: “He will dance at Beilby’s ball, where the sheriff plays the music” (A Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1811). It is perhaps possible that ‘to dance Beilby’s hornpipe’ meant the same thing. At any rate, no one knows who Beilby/Bielbie was, although Noel Jackson notes that one of the musical associates of Northumbrian musician Bewick the Younger was named Bielbie. See also the related “Linehope Lope.” Also, “The Original Schottische” in the Thomas Hardy manuscripts, and “The Original Schottische Polka” in Michael Turner’s manuscript copybooks are close variants. MWM 1031, Joe Hutton – “Music from Northumberland and the Border Country” (1983. Paired with “Mrs. Anne Jamieson’s Favourite”).

X:1

T:Bielbie’s Hornpipe

C:(Curlew or Green Bay Hornpipe)

Q:1/4=140

I:abc2nwc

M:4/4

L:1/8

Z:Lewes Favourites Download (http://members.aol.com/lewesarmsfolk/LFTunes.html)

K:G

D2|:G3/2A/2 B3/2c/2 d3/2g/2 f3/2a/2|g2B2d2-d3/2B/2|\

c3/2e/2 A3/2B/2 c2c2|B3/2d/2 G3/2A/2 B3/2c/2 B3/2A/2|

G3/2A/2 B3/2c/2 d3/2g/2 f3/2a/2|g2B2d2-d3/2B/2|\

c3/2e/2 A3/2B2 c3/2B/2 c3/2A/2|\

[1G2B2G2D2:|[2G2B2G3/2A/2 B3/2c/2

|:d2b2c2a2|B2g3/2f/2 g3/2d/2 B3/2G/2|F3/2G/2 A3/2B/2 c3/2A/2 F3/2D/2|\

G3/2F/2 G3/2A/2 B3/2A/2 B3/2c/2|

d2b2c2a2|B2g3/2f/2 g3/2d/2 B3/2G/2|F3/2G/2 A3/2B/2 c3/2A/2 F3/2A/2|\

[1A3/2G/2 G3/2F/2 G3/2A/2 B3/2c/2:|\

[2A3/2G/2 G3/2F/2 G4|]

 

BIEN AIMÉE, LA.  French, Country Dance (2/4 time). A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. From the contradance book (tunes with dance instructions) of Robert Daubat (who styled himself Robert d’Aubat de Saint-Flour), born in Saint-Flour, Cantal, France, in 1714, dying in Gent, Belgium, in 1782. According to Belgian fiddler Luc De Cat, at the time of the publication of his collection (1757) Daubat was a dancing master in Gent and taught at several schools and theaters.  He also was the leader of a choir and was a violin player in a theater. Mr. De Cat identifies a list of subscribers of the original publication, numbering 132 individuals, of the higher level of society and the nobility, but also including musicians and dance-masters (including the ballet-master from the Italian opera in London). Many of the tunes are written with parts for various instruments, and include a numbered bass. Daubat (Cent Contredanses en Rond), 1757; No. 39.

X:1

T:Bien Aimée, La

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Daubat – Cent Contredanses en Rond (1757), No. 39

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

eaec | cecA | BE (B/c/d) | caec | cecA | (Bd) (EG) | A2 A,2 :|

|: (.B.c.B.A) | (GBG).E | .e(fed) | .c(ecA) | {b}aeec | fdcB | (ce) (EG) | A2 A,2 :|

 

BIG ALEC’S JIG. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. F Major. Standard tuning. AABB’. Composed by fiddler Jerry Holland (Invernes, Cape Breton). Cranford (Jerry Holland’s), 1995; No. 256, pg. 74.

 


BIG BALL IN TOWN. "Roll On the Ground." Old‑Time, Song Tune. The title composition was the result of The Skillet Licker's marrying of the tune "Roll(ing) on the Ground" with new words. The tune was recorded by J.E. Mainer's Mountaineers, and by West Virginia string band duo the Cumberland Mountain Entertainers (Sam Caplinger & fiddler Andy Patterson {1893‑1950}) in 1928 for Brunswick‑Vocalion (Later the duo moved to Akron, Ohio, and formed the Dixie Harmonizers, who recorded for Gennett). Heritage 048, "Georgia Fiddle Bands" {Brandywine, 1982} (1983).

 

BIG BARNEY(‘S JIG) {Port Bhriain Mhóir}. Scottish, Irish; Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AA'BB. Breathnach (CRÉ IV), 1996; No. 7, pg. 4 (appears as “Port Bhriain Mhóir”). Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3, No. 255, pg. 28.

X:1

T:Big Barney

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 3, No. 255 (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

GBd gfe|dec B2c|dBG G2A|BGE E2F|GBd gfe|

dec B2c|dBG ABc|BGG G2||:d|gfg efg|dec BAG|

gfg efg|fdd d2d|efg gfe|dec B2c|dBG ABc|BGG G2:|

 

BIG BEN HORNPIPE. English, Hornpipe. B Flat Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Howe (1000 Jigs and Reels), c. 1867; pg. 61.

X:1

T:Big Ben Hornpipe

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Howe – 1000 Jigs and Reels (c. 1867)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bb

F2 | B2 (FB) (3dcB (3AGF | E2g2g2 f>e | d>f d>B c>e c>A | B2 (3dfb A2 (3ceg |

B2 (FB) (3dcB (3AGF | E2g2g2f>e | (3dba (3gfe (3ded (3cBA | B2d2B2 :: F2 |

B>d f>b (b>a) (b>a) | g>^f g>f g2 c>B | A>B c>d e>g f>e | d>^c d>c d2 d>c |

B>d f>b (b>a) (b>a) | F>A c>e g2 f>e | (3dfd B>d (3cec A>c | B2b2B2 :|

           

BIG BEND GALS. Old-Time, Song & Breakdown. From Virginia’s Shelor Family (lyrics courtesy Carl Baron).

***

There’s no use in talking ‘bout the Big Bend Gal,

That lives on the county line;

For Betsy Jane from the prairie plain

Just leaves them way behind.

You never would see such a likely woman,

If you searched out all creation;

She beats the gals from the flat creek bottom,

She’s the queen of the whole plantation.

***

She totes herself like a flying squirrel    [Carl Baron – “probably a reference to a motorcycle”]

And the men folk all come around;

And lord how the dewdrops get off the grass

When she puts her feet upon the ground.

She’s just as ripe as an apple on a tree,

And she looks so pretty and snug;

And her mouth’s just as sweet as a corncob stopper

That comes out of a molasses jug.

***

The calf comes a-loping when the old cow calls,

And the possum dog comes to the horn;

And the grape vine climbs up the tall oak tree,

And the morning glory wraps around the corn.

And a fellow will turn around and come pretty quick,

When he hears that pretty gal laugh;

She hangs on his arm like a bird on a tree

As they both go walking up the path.

***

Her eyes give light like a foxfire chunk,

And her teeth are white as snow;

And the fellers in the cotton patch keep looking back

When they see her come chopping down the row.

She’s gone crowd the hands where the crabgrass grows,

And kill the weeds as she goes;

She skippers up the furrow in a cloud of dust,

As she busts them clods with a hoe.

***

Blue Ridge Institute BRI 005, The Shelor Family – “Virginia Traditions: Blue Ridge Piano Syles.”  RCA – LPV 552, “Early Rural String Bands.”

 

BIG BOTTOM RAG. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. The title appears in a list of Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by folklorist/musicologist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.

 

BIG BOW WOW, THE. AKA and see "The Beardless Boy," "The Dissipated Youth [1]," "Giolla na Scriob," "Kate Kearney," "Priest avourneen," "Seanbhean Chrion an Drantain," “Stagger the Buck,” "Ta an Coileach ag Fogairt an Lae [2]," "When the cock crows it is day [3]." Scottish, Jig. The tune's earliest appearance in print is in Robert Ross's 1780 collection (pg. 32), according to John Glen. Breathnach (1976) finds the first part of Aird’s “Big Bow Wow” (Selections of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, vol. I, 1782, 104) to be the same as that of “An Cailín Deas Donn/The Pretty Brown Girl.”

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

 

BIG BOY WALTZ. See "Valse de Famille," "Valse de Bayou Chene."

 

BIG CABIN. AKA and see "The Appalachian Fiddler." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, North Carolina. Learned by fiddler Tommy Hunter from his grandfather James W. Hunter (both from Madison County, North Carolina).

 

BIG CAPTAIN OF CARTLEHAUGH, THE.  Scottish, Highland Schottische or Strathspey. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by the great Scots fiddler-composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904; pg. 77.

X:1

T:Big Captain of Cartlehaugh, The

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Highland Schottische or Strathspey

C:J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927)

S:Skinner – Harp and Claymore (1904)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

({c}d>)A A2 d>B B2 | A>F D>F E>C A,2 | ({c}d>)A A2 d>B B>d | (c/B/A) E>^G ({G}A2)A |

({c}d>)A A2 ({c}d>)BB2 | AF>DF> E>CA,>A | d<A A2 ({c}d>B A>G | (F/E/D) A,>C {C}[D2D2] D ||

g | (f/e/d) a>c’ ({c’}d’>)af>d | (c/B/A) e>^g a>ec>A | f/e/d a>c’ ({c’}d’>)af>d’ | (c’/b/a) e>^g ({g}a2) a>=g |

(f/e/d) a>c’ ({c’}d’)af>d | (c/B/A) e>^g a>ec>A | .d/.c/.B .A/.B/.c .d/.c/.B Az/G/ | F/E/D A,>C {C}[D2D2]Dz ||

 

BIG CHIEF, THE. Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, southeastern Pa. G Major ('A' part) & E Minor ('B' part). Standard tuning. AABB. Bayard (1981) says this title is a "floater," appearing also in unrelated 6/8 time tunes, and that the only tune he has found resembling this one is "The Essence of Tampa." A tune by this title, a variant of “The Champion [2],” was printed in a Midwest collection by Adam (1928/1931). Source for notated version: fiddler Willaim Shape (Greene County, Pa., 1930's) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 101, pg. 59.

 

BIG CHIEF SITTING IN THE RAIN. AKA and see "Chief Sitting Bull."

 

BIG COFFIN REEL (Ciste Mhor). AKA and see “Put Me in the Big Chest.” Cape Breton, Reel. Rounder 7011, "The Beatons of Mabou: Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton" (1978).

 


BIG DAN O'MAHONY (Domnall Mor Ua Matgamna). Irish, Hornpipe. A Mixolydian (O'Neill/Krassen): A Major (O'Neill/1850): A Dorian (O'Neill/1001). Standard tuning. AAB. Donal “Dan” O’Mahony (c. 1777-1857) was the maternal grandfather of compiler and collector Captain Francis O’Neill, and a holder of extensive lands near Drimoleague, County Cork. O’Mahoney was ‘a latter-day chieftain’ who kept open house for traveling musicians (Carolan, 1997). O'Neill, 1976; pg. 171. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1585, pg. 294. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 832, pg. 144.

X:1

T:Big Dan O’Mahony

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1903), No. 832

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Ador

GB|AGAB A2 Bd|edBA G2 Bd|e2 ef gfea|edBA G3B

AGAB A2 Bd|edBA G2 ed|B2 AG gdBd|c2A2A2:|

||Bd|e2 ef g2 fe|a2a2g2 ea|edef gfea|edBA G2 Bd|e2 ef gfge|abag e2 ea|

gedg edBd|c2 AA A2 Bd|e2 ef gfge|(3aba ag e2 ea|edef gfea|

edBA G2 AB|c2 Bc d2 cd|efge a2a2|gfea edBd|c2A2A2||

                                   

BIG DIPPER, THE. Old-Time. Composed by David Cahn, Seattle, Washington.

                       

BIG-EARED MULE [1]. AKA and see "Flop-Eared Mule [1]." Old-Time, Breakdown. The tune was recorded by Kentucky-born William B. Houchens (1884-c.1955), who waxed a dozen tunes for the Starr Piano Company of Indiana (including such chestnuts as “Arkansas Traveller” and “Turkey in the Straw”). Houchens spent much of his adult life running a music conservatory in Dayton, Ohio, where he taught a variety of stringed instruments (Charles Wolfe). Significant was the fact that Houchens recorded his sides prior to what is thought of as the first country music recordings by Fiddlin’ John Carson. Supertone 9169 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts.

 

BIG-EARED MULE [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Ky. D Major ('A' & 'B' parts) & G Major ('C' part). Standard tuning. AABCC'. "Flop Eared Mule" seems a distant relation in this version, identified mostly by the key change between parts. Source for notated version: John Salyer (Magoffin County, Ky.) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 19.

 

BIG EYED RABBIT [1]. Old‑Time, Breakdown. The tune is a member of a group of similar tunes which includes "John Brown's Dream."

 

BIG-EYED RABBIT [2]. Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA; Alabama, Mississippi, western North Carolina. A Major. AEae (e.g. Tommy Jarrell, Kirk Sutphin) or Standard tuning. ABB (irregular 'A' part): AABB (Silberberg). Recorded by Quitman, Mississippi, fiddler Charles Long in 1939 in the field for the Library of Congress.

***

Yonder comes a rabbit,

Fast as he can run,

If I see another one,

Gonna shoot him with a double-barrel gun.

Gonna shoot him with my gun.

***

Yonder comes a rabbit,

Slippin' through the sand,

Shoot that rabbit, he don't care,

Fry him in my pan,

Fry him in my pan.

***

Chorus:

Rockin' in a weary land (x2)

or   Big-eyed rabbit's gone, gone (x2)

***

Yonder comes my darlin',

How do I know?

Know her by her bright blue eyes,

Shinein' bright like gold,

Shinein' bright like gold.  (Tommy Jarrell/Plank Road String Band).

***

Bob Woodcock (Pa.) supplied this verse (a coney is an old English term for a rabbit—Coney Island=Rabbit Island):

***

Coney on the island, coney on the run,

I'll get that rabbit in my pan, I'll shoot him with my gun

***

The tune, as recorded in the 1920’s by the Alabama old-time duo the Stripling Brothers, shows up in some remarkable places. The Striplings’ record was reissued (as were several American old-time sides) in Québec, albeit with a new title in French. In the case of “Big-Eyed Rabbit,” the tune was renamed “Le reel de la Malbaie.” The melody was also picked up in Ireland where it was rendered as a barn dance, where, for example the famous fiddler Sean Maguire recorded it as the first tune of his “Canadian Barndance” (a Canadian Barn Dance is a type of progressive couples dance popular in Ireland and Scotland—many 2/4 tunes have been the vehicle for the dance). Sources for notated versions: Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]; Bruce Reid [Silberberg]. Kuntz, Private Collection. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 8. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 38. Carryon Records 005, "The Renegades" (1993). County 401, "The Stripling Brothers." County CO-CD-2711, Kirk Sutphin - "Old Roots and New Branches" (1994). Mountain 310, Tommy Jarrell ‑ "Joke on the Puppy" (1976. Learned brom his father.). Vocalion 5412 (78 RPM), Stripling Brothers (Ala., played in C Major) {1929}.

X:1

T:Big Eyed Rabbit [2]

M:C|

L:1/8

K:A

c4 c3c |BA A2 A2cB | ABcA B2c2 | d3d d4 | d2d2f2f2 | e2e2 d4 :|

|: c2 B2 A2 F2 | B3c B2BB | cBAc BAFG | A2 AB A4 :|

X:2

T:Big Eyed Rabbit

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

N:AEae tuning

S:Kirk Sutphin

N:From a transcription by John Lamancusa, by permission. See http://www.mne.psu.edu/lamancusa/tunes.htm

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

EF |: A2 AA cA B2 | A3B A2 (A2 | A)BAc BAcA | f3e f2 (f2 |

f)gaa afed | ce2f e2 fe | cBcB AGFE | B3 c BABc | AcBA FEFG |1

A3B A2 EF :|2 A3B A2 (A2 ||: A)cBA FEFE | B3 c BABc |

AcBA FEFG |1 A3 B A2 (A2 :|2 A3B A2 ||

 

BIG EYED RABBIT [3]. Old-Time. Sung to a different tune than the Tommy Jarrell version. Rounder 1029 and Columbia 129‑D (78 RPM), 1924, Samantha Bumgarner (Asheville, N.C.).

                       

BIG FANCY. Old-Time, Breakdown. AEae or ADae tunings. AB’ABCCCCCC’. The tonality vacillates between A and D. In the repertoire of Pocahontas County, West Virginia, fiddler Edden Hammons, who adds an extra beat in the first strain in the repeat, but not at the end of the second time through the strain (i.e. just before the second strain). The second part (played a variable number of times, but usually six), is played by the source with an extra beat added as it goes back to the first part. Alan Jabbour says he knows of “no other clear variants of the tune, though it bears a general resemblance to many other older tunes from the region.” West Virginia University Press SA-1, “The Edden Hammons Collection, vol. 1” (1999).

                       

BIG FAT GAL'S GOOD I KNOW, BUT A LITTLE FAT GAL'S BETTER O!  AKA and see "Shoehammer," "Paddy Got Drunk on Fish and Potatoes." American, Jig. USA, southwestern Pa. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Christeson's (1973) "Quadrille, No. 188" has a general resemblance to this tune, in the 'A' part only. Sources for notated versions: Irvin Yaugher (Fayette County, Pa., 1946) & Wellington Funk (Greene County, Pa., 1930's) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 532A & 531B, pg. 474.

                                   

BIG FAT LIZA JANE. Old-Time. In the repertoire of Cyle Creed.

                                   

BIG FISH. Old‑Time, Breakdown. This Clay County, West Virginia, tune is a version of "Rye Straw [1]."  Gerry Milnes (Play of a Fiddle, 1999) records that the tune was learned from legendary fiddler Lewis Johnson “Uncle” Jack McElwain (1856-1938) of White Oak (a tributary of Laurel Creek, near the village of Erbacon, Webster County, West Virginia) in a unique way by fiddler Dewey Hamrick. It seems that Hamrick’s father, who did not fiddle, walked forty miles to and from McElwain’s house to hear him play, and remembered and whistled the tunes (among them “Big Fish”) when he got home for Hamrick to learn.

           

BIGFOOT. See “Bigfooted N....r in the Sandy Land.”

           

BIG-FOOTED COON, THE. AKA and see "Big‑Footed N....r (in the Sandy Land) [1]." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: John Aaron (Dixon, Missouri) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, vol. 2), 1984; No. 81, pg. 54.

           

BIG-FOOTED MAN (IN THE SANDY LOT). See "Big‑Footed N....r (in the Sandy Land) [1]."

           


BIG-FOOTED NIGGER (IN THE SANDY LAND) [1]. AKA – “Bigfoot.” AKA and see "Big‑Footed N....r/Man (in the Sandy Lot)," "Sandy Lot," "Big‑Footed Man," "Big‑Footed Coon," "Virginia Reel." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA; N.C., Ala., Miss., Tenn. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune is a mixture of phrases from common dance tunes. The coarse phrase, played on the middle strings will be recognized from the "Turkey in the Straw"‑"Natchez Under the Hill [1]"‑"Zip Coon" tune family, while the fine part will be found in tunes like “Fort Smith [1]" and "Fort Smith Breakdown [2]" (as played by Ozark old‑time musician Luke Highnight). Charles Wolfe says the Stripling Brothers (Charlie and Ira) learned the tune from local West Alabama fiddlers (Devil's Box, Dec. 1982), and Robert Fleder (1971) relates (in liner notes to the County album of Stripling Brothers releases) that Charlie Stripling recalled "waking up one morning at 3:00 with the second part of the tune running through his head, having heard it played only once earlier in the evening by a neighbor, Henry Ludlow." Stripling was a contest fiddler, and the recording of "Big Footed Man in the Sandy Lot" includes a 'trick' or feature that helped him impress judges and win in competitions; in the midddle of the song he inserts a chorus of "Sweet Bye & Bye." Sources for notated versions: Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]; Charlie Stripling (Alabama) [Phillips]. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, vol. 1), 1994; pg. 23. Recorded by the Roane County (East Tenn.) Ramblers {1929 }.  County 401, "The Stripling Brothers." Library of Congress AFS 4806‑H‑3, Osey Helton (Western N.C.). Library of Congress recording, 1939, W.A. Bledsoe, Meridian, Mississippi (appears as "Big Footed N....r in a Sandy Lot" and was learned from his father in Lincoln County, Tennessee). Mississippi Department of Archives and History AH‑002, W.A. Bledsoe ‑ "Great Big Yam Potatoes: Anglo‑American Fiddle Music from Mississippi" (1939). Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin ‑ "Banging and Sawing" (1985). Vocalion 5321 (78 RPM), Stripling Brothers (Pickens Cty., Alabama; learned from Henry Ludlow) {1928} [appears as "Big‑Footed N....r in the Sandy Lot"].

X:1

T:Bigfoot

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Liz Slade

K:G

(3D/E/F/|G)A/A/ BA/(B/|B/)D/G/E/ D(3D/E/F/|G)A/A/ B/A/G/(D/|

E>)(D E/)(3D/E/F/|G)A/A/ BA/(B/|B/)D/G/E/ DD/D/|D/(E/D/)(D/ E)F|(G/ B) (G/ B:|

|:(e|g/)(a/g/)g/ (g/e/)d|e/f/e/(d/ B/)B/d|(e/ e) (e/ ef|e/(d/B/)B/ d(e|

g)g/g/ g/e/d|e/f/e/A/ G(A/(B/|B/)A/d/(A/ B/A/)G|(C/ E) (C/ E:|

X:2

T:Big Footed Man in the Sandy Lot

R:Reel

M:4/4

L:1/8

N:From Greg Canote

Z:Transcribed by Bruce Thomson

K:G

|:gage gagf|edBc d4|e3g adBc|[d3f3] [fd] [d4f4]|gage gagf|

edBc d4|BAGB AGED|[G3B3] [GB] [G4B4]:|

|:G2BG AGBG|AGEF G4|e3g edBc|d3d d4|

gage gagf|edBc d4|BAGB AGFD|[G3B3][GB] [G4B4]:|

 

BIG FOOTED NIGGER [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. Related to “Streak o’ Lean, Streak o’ Fat,” “Hell Broke Loose in Georgia,” as recorded by the Skillet Lickers. Fiddlin’ John Carson (north Georgia) recorded “Big Footed N....r [2]" on a 78 RPM, and it was also in the repertoire of Clyde and John Troxell under this title.  

           

BIG FOOTED SORREL. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. USA, northwest Alabama. The tune was listed in the Northwest Alabamian (8/29/29) as likely to have been played at a local fiddlers' convention (Cauthen, 1990).

           

BIG FOUR. Old‑Time. USA, Ala. F Major. Standard tuning. Recorded for Decca in 1936 by Ala. fiddler Charlie Stripling; named after a local fishing hole.

                       

BIG (*) DEAL. Irish, Polka. G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician, composer and writer Bill Black.

X: 1

T: Big (*) Deal

M: 2/4

L: 1/8

R: polka

C: B. Black

N: Dedicated to the Y2K Bug & its whimpering disappearance into the

N: vast history of human folly. You can use (*) to insert an adjective

N: of your choice.

K: G

B>A GA | Be dA | B>A GD | EG A2 | B>A GA | Bg ed | (3Bcd cA | BG G2 :|

g>e de | gb af | g>e dg | eg a2 | g>e de | gb af | gd cA | BG GB |

g>e de | gb af | g>e dg | eg a2 | bg af | (3efg dB | Ac BA | BG G2 ||

                       

BIG HEADED MAN, THE (Fear a’ Chinn Mhòir).  AKA and see “Lord Dunmore.”

 

BIG HOEDOWN. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. A Mixolydian. AEae tuning. ABBCC. In the repertoire of Webster County, West Virginia, fiddler Edden Hammons (1874-1955), born to a musical family, who won first place at the fiddle contest at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair. Hammons and his family lived an isolated rural existence, living from hunting, fishing, crafts, odd-jobs, and fiddling, but he remains one of the most influential old-time fiddlers. Edden Hammons Collection, Disc 2 (1984).

See also listing at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:Big Hoedown

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Edd’n Hammons, via David Bragger

N:AEae tuning

N:Written as it sounds, not as played on bottom strings

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Amix

A,2(a2|a2)g2e2d2|cdef g2 eg |a2 (3gag e2d2|cABd cdeg|

a2 (3gag e2 d2|cdef g3^g|abag e2d2|cABd cA A2||

|:ef g2 e2 d2|cABd c2d2|ef g2 e2 d2|cABd cA A2:|

|:A,2 A^G [A2A2] Ac|BABd c2c2|A,2 A^G [A2A2] Ac|BABd cA A2|

A,2 A^G [A2A2] Ac|BABd c2d2|efgg e2d2|cABd cA A2:||

                       

BIG-HORNED CATTLE. Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. On Charlie Walden’s list of ‘100 essential Missouri fiddle tunes’. Missouri fiddler Cyril Stinnett learned the tune from his father, who was from the southern part of the state, around Ford. Source for notated version: Cyril Stinnett, "from tradition rather than from the recording industry" (Missouri) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, vol. 2), 1984; No. 28, pg. 20. Rounder 0529, Dwight Lamb – “Hell Agin the Barn Door” (2005).

X:1

T:Big Horned Cattle

L:1/8

M:2/4

S:From Missouri fiddler Cyril Stinnet, from a transcription by Charlie Walden

N:Stinnet was the only fiddler Walden heard play this tune

K:A

A,/C/E/F/ AA/c/|B/A/c/A/ e2|A,/C/E/F/ A>c|B/A/F/D/ E2| A,/C/E/F/ AA/c/|

B/A/c/A/ ee/g/|f/g/a/f/ e/c/B/G/|A/c/B/G/  A2:|

|:e/aa/4a/4 ab/a/|g/bb/4b/4 bb/g/|e/ag/ a/b/a/f/|e/c/B/G/ A/B/c/d/|

e/aa/4a/4 ab/a/|g/bb/4b/4 bb/g/|e/ag/ a/b/a/f/|e/c/B/G/ A2:|

           

BIG INDIAN. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. A traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tune recorded by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph for the Library of Congress in the early 1940's.

           

BIG INDIAN HORNPIPE. Old‑Time, Hornpipe. USA, northeast Ky. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: Buddy Thomas (KY) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 180. Rounder 0032, Buddy Thomas (northeast Ky.) ‑ "Kitty Puss: Old Time Fiddle Music From Kentucky."

           

BIG JIG, THE. AKA and see "Irish Washerwoman" (An Bhean Niochain Eireannach), "Paddy McGinty's Goat," "Snouts and Ears of America," "Jackson's Delight [1]," "Corporal Casey [1]," "Bhean Niochain."

           


BIG JOHN McNEIL(L)/McNEAL. AKA and see "John McNeil('s Reel)." Canadian, American, Scottish; Reel. Canada, widely known. USA; New England, Missouri. A Major. Standard (or infrequently AEae) tuning. AABB (Gibbons, Messer, Sweet): AABB' (Miller & Perron): AA'BB' (Begin, Perlman, Phillips). Though now known as a Canadian standard it originally was a reel composed (as “John McNeil”) by the brilliant Scottish fiddler Peter Milne (1824-1908), one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers and early playing partners, who earned his living playing in theaters until his opium addiction (he abused laudanum, originally prescribed for rheumatism) reduced him to busking on ferry‑boats crossing the Firth of Forth. He died in unpleasant circumstances in a mental institution. John McNeil was a famous Highland dancer of the mid-to-later 19th century (see note for “John McNeil’s Reel” for more). The melody was in the repertoire of Cyrill Stinnett, a fiddler who epitomised the 'North Missouri Hornpipe Style' of playing, who apparently learned it and other tunes from listening to Canadian fiddlers broadcasting on the radio from Canada. Indeed, an influential recording of the tune was made ‘Down-East’ Canadian fiddler Don Messer with his group the Islanders, early in the 1940’s—among the first of the sides the group waxed. A similar melody is “Lord Ramsay’s Reel [4].” Perlman (1996) notes the tune is a popular tune on Prince Edward Island, and a favorite vehicle for stepdancing in Prince County, PEI, on the eastern part of the island. Irish fiddler Sean Maguire recorded the melody in the 1960’s under the title “Betty’s Fancy [2].”

***

Sources for notated versions: Max Sexsmith (British Columbia), who learned this "classic" reel in the 1940's from radio broadcasts and records by Don Messer and His Islanders (who recorded it in 1942) [Gibbons]; Jay Unger (West Hurley, New York) via Bud Snow (Putnam County, New York) who also learned it from Canadian fiddler Don Messer [Fiddle Fever]; Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ontario) [Begin]. Francis MacDonald (b. 1940, Morell Rear, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 5, pg. 19. Feldman & O’Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 187. Gibbons (As It Comes: Folk Fiddling From Prince George, British Columbia), 1982; No. 11, pgs. 28‑29. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 12, pg. 79. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 133. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 96. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, vol. 1), 1994; pg. 23. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 9. Sweet (Fifer’s Delight), 1964; pg. 77. Condor 977‑1489, "Graham & Eleanor Townsend Live at Barre, Vermont." Flying Fish FF 247, "Fiddle Fever" (1981). Fretless 101, "The Campbell Family: Champion Fiddlers." GRT Records SP 203, “Ward Allen Presents Maple Leaf Hoedown, Vol. 1” (reissue). GRT Records 9230-1031, “The Best of Ward Allen” (1973). MCA Records MCAD 4037, “The Very Best of Don Messer” (1994). Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion" (taught to Hartford in his early years by Missouri fiddler Gene Goforth).

X:1

T:Big John McNeil

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

K:A

A,2CE FE CE|AE CE FE CE|A,2CE FE CE|FA GF ED CB,|

A,2CE FE CE|AE CE FE CB,|A,C B,D CE DF|EF Bd cA A2:|

|:eA fA eA cd|eA fA e2 (3agf|eA fA eA ce| de dc B2 cd|

eA fA eA cd|eA fA e2 fg|ag fe fe dc|1 de fg a2 cd:|2 BA GF ED CB,|]

           

BIG JOHN’S HARD JIG. Irish, Jig. Compass 7 4287 2, Cathal McConnell – “Long Expectant Comes at Last” (2000. Learned from County Fermanagh fiddler Big John McManus, who had it from his unle Hugh Gunn, also a fiddler).

           

BIG JOHN'S REEL (Ríl Sheáin Mhoir). Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. The tune is named either after County Fermanagh fiddler ‘Big’ John McManus or John Gunn. A note from Breathnach’s source (Cathcart, who had no name for the tune) stated: “One of Johnnie Gunn’s”. County Fermanagh flute player Cathal McConnell, who recorded the tune on his album “Lough Erne’s Shore” gave the tune the name “Big John’s” and sourced it to “Big John McManus, who got (it) from his uncle, the late Hiugh Gunn…” Source for notated version: fiddler John Cathcart (County Fermanagh) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRÉ V), 1999; No. 141, pg. 71. Grapevine GRACD 230, Nomos – “Set You Free” (1996). Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned from the playing of Gary Hastings).

X:1

T:Big John’s Reel

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel
K:D
DFAD fdAF | G3F GABc | d2fd ecAF | E3D EGFE |…

           

BIG KIRSTY. Scottish, Strathspey. E Minor ('A' part) & G Major ('B' part). Standard tuning. AABB'. See also the related Scottish tunes “"A' the Way to Galloway&,quot; "Ciorsdaidh Mhor” and "Miss Stewart Bun Rannoch,” and the Irish family of tunes including “All the Way to Galway [1]” and “Road to Lindesvoorna [1]." Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; Set 19, No. 3, pg. 12.

X:1

T:Big Kirsty

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 1, No. 3  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Emin

B|e>fg>e d>B (3Bcd|c>A (3ABc d>BB>d|e>fg>e d>B (3Bcd|c>AB>G (E2E):|

|:D|G>AB>c d>B (3Bcd|c>A (3ABc d>BB>A|G>AB>C d>B(3Bcd|1 c>AB>G (E2E):|2 c>AB>^d (e2 e)||

|:(f|g2 f>e (d<B) (3Bcd|c<A (3ABc (d<B) (B<d)|g2 f>e (d<B) (3Bcd|c>AB>G (E2E):|

|:D|G>AB>c (d<B) (3Bcd|(c<A) (3ABc (d<B) B>A|G>AB>c (d<B) (3Bcd|c>AB>G (E2E):||

           

BIG LIMBER. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.

           

BIG LIZA JANE. Old-Time, Breakdown. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB’. Source for notated version: Franklin George (W.Va.) via Alan Garren & Rose City Aces (Portland, Oregon) [Songer]. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 28.

           

BIG MAC JIG. American, Jig. D Major ('A' part) & A Major ('B' part). Standard tuning. AA'BB'. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 359.

           

BIG MAMOU (BLUES). AKA and see "Grand Mamou Blues." As "Big Mamou", the song recorded by Link Davis gained some national popularity.

           

BIG MEADOWS WALTZ. American, Waltz. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Vermont fiddler Pete Sutherland. Sutherland (Bareface), 1984; pg. 10.

 

BIG MUDDY.  Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. A member of the large "My Love is/She's But a Lassie Yet [1]" tune family, in the repertoire of Missouri train engineer and dance fiddler Glenn Rickman. Rickman recalled that he often played this tune for dancing, especially a memorable night in 1931 when a fight broke out over a half-pint of moonshine. Source for notated version: Glenn Rickman (1901-1982, Hurley, Missouri) [Beisswenger & McCann]. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozark Fiddle Music), 2008; pg. 109.

 

BIG MULE, THE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BCC’. Jeff Titon (2001) identifies this melody as in the same family of tunes as “Old Dubuque” (that also includes the tunes "Duck River,” “Fiddling Phil,” "Five Miles From Town [2]," "General Lee," “Phiddlin’ Phil” and "Sally in the Green Corn.") Tom Verdot believes this family may have been derived from an 1840’s minstrel tune called “Coonie in the Holler” Titon says a less closely related tune is Milo Bigger’s (Glasgow, Kentucky) “Scott’s Return.” “Big Mule” was also in the repertoire of Kentucky fiddler Street Butler, who said his source was a man named Charley Latham. The melody features a ‘crooked’ or irregularly measured ‘B’ part. Source for notated version: a field recording by Bruce Greene of the playing of W. L. “Jake” Phelps (Elkton, Todd County, Ky., 1973) [Titon]. Titon (Old-Time Kentucky Fiddle Tunes), 2001; No. 6, pg. 37.

                       

BIG NOSED HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Fire on/in the Mountain [1]." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. Kentucky fiddler Ted Gosset (b. 1904) stated this title was a local alternate title for "Fire In the Mountain," of the "Sally Goodin'" family of tunes.


           

BIG OX, THE (An Bullán Mór). Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Dorian. Standard tuning. AB. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 781, pg. 382.

X:1

T:An Bullán Mór (The Big Ox)

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Rather slow”

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Ddor

D>EFGAc | ddd>efd | c>AAGF>G | F<D D3C | D>EFGAc | dd d2 d/e/f/d/ |

e>d cB/A/ GA/F/ | DF F3z || A/c/d/e/ f2 e/g/f/e/ | ddd>efd | c>AAGF>G |

F<D D3C | D>EFGAc | dd d2 d/e/f/d/ | e>d cB/A/ GA/F/ | DF F3z ||

           

BIG PAT'S (DANDY) REEL. AKA and see "Tie the Ribbons [1]," "Trim the Bonnet," "Jimmy the Creelmaker," "Salamanca [3]," "The Pigeon House," "The Dandy Reel," "The Hills of Clady," "The Clady Reel," "O'Connell's Trip to Parliament [2]." Irish, Reel; New England, Hornpipe. E Minor (O'Neill): B Minor (Tolman). Standard tuning. AB (O'Neill/1850): AABB' (O'Neill/Krassen): AABB (Tolman). Source for notated version: Francis O'Neill learned the tune from an accomplished West Clare flute player (and Chicago police patrolman) named Patrick "Big Pat" O'Mahony, a man of prodigious physique of whom he said: "¼the 'swing' of his execution was perfect, but instead of 'beating time' with his foot on the floor like most musicians he was never so much at ease as when seated in a chair tilted back against a wall, while both feet swung rhythmically like a double pendulum" [O'Neill, Irish Folk Music]. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 94. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1979; No. 1192, pg. 225. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 16 (appears as "Big Pat," a hornpipe).

X:1

T:Big Pat's Reel

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

K:G

(dc)|BGEF G2(BG)|G2(BG) (FA)D2|BGEFG2(Bd)|g2(fg)e2(dc)|BGEFG2(BG)|

G2(BG)(FA)D2|BGEF GAB^d|egfge2||(ef)|gfga bgag|(fa)ag (fd) dz|

gfga bgag|fe^dfe2(ef)|gfga bgag|(fa)ag (fd) dz|g2(ge)f2(fd)|egfge2||

 

BIG PAT’S REEL [2].  Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: transcribed by Bernie Stocks, who noted it in session in Derrygonelly, Co. Fermanagh in 1993 from the playing of fiddler Ciaran Kelly [Miller]. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 121, pg. 82.

           

BIG RED. Irish, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB tuning. A modern composition by Baltimore area fiddler, collector and musicologist Philippe Varlet. Recorded by the House Band under the title "The Philadelphia Reel" because their source thought that was where it came from. Popcorn Behavior – “Journeywork” (1997).

X:1

T:Big Red
M:C|
L:1/8
Q:220
C:Philippe Varlet
R:Reel
K:A
A,B, | CF~F2 {d}BAFA | ceef ecAc | B/2B/2B fB {d}cBfB |  B/2B/2B fB {d}cBAE |
FA{d}cA {d}BAFA | cAef ecAc | B/2B/2B fB {d}cAec | {d}BAGE F2 :||:
AB | cf~f2 defa | ec{d}cB A3 B | ceef ecAB | cB{d}BA GBEB |
cf~f2 defa | ec{d}cB A3 B | ceag fecA | {d}BAGE F2 :||

           

BIG REEL OF BALLYNACALLY, THE. Irish, Reel. Shanachie SH-78010, Solas - “Sunny Spells and Scattered Showers” (1997).

           

BIG REEL OF CALLIGHTOWN, THE. Irish, Reel. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, vol. 1, No. 46.

           

BIG SANDY RIVER. Bluegrass, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Kenny Baker and Bill Monroe (1963). Source for notated version: Stuart Williams (Seattle) [Silberberg]. Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 40. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 9. County 761, "Kenny Baker Plays Bill Monroe." Vetco 506, Fiddlin' Van Kidwell ‑ "Midnight Ride." Voyager 316‑S, Vivian Williams and Barbara Lamb ‑ "Twin Sisters."

           

BIG SCOTCH. The name of a tune in the repertoire of Confederate veteran Arnold A. Parrish of Willow Springs (Wake County, N.C.), as recorded by the old Raleigh News and Observer. Gail Gillespie points out that Willow Springs is near the border of Wake and Harnett counties, and that Harnett county, especially, had a number of Scots immigrants through the 1840’s.

                       


BIG SCIOTY/SCIOTA, THE. Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. A popular tune in the old‑time revival repertoire. It is named for the Scioto/Sciota (pronunciations vary) River, which flows through Ohio and empties into the Ohio River. The source for most of the versions, Marlinton, West Virginia, fiddler Burl Hammons, evidently played different versions of the tune (or perhaps it was a tune in evolution), for recordings of his playing by different collectors reveal variations of the melody. These different versions have influenced different revival bands ‑‑ contrast, for example, the Red Clay Rambler's version (learned from a 1970 field recording of Hammons by Malcolm Owen, Blanton Owen and Bert Levy) with versions based on the Alan Jabbour‑collected recording of Burl which appears on the Library of Congress recording "The Hammons Family." Alan Jabbour says Burl simply irregularly repeated phrases within the tune, “making it wonderfully crooked. In my memory, he adds repeated phrases not just in the second (low) strain but in the first (high) as well. In both cases the candidate for possible repetition is the third phrase.” (Fiddle-L 12/06/04). See John Salyer’s “Kentucky Winder” for a Magoffin County, Ky., variant of “Big Sciota.” Sources for notated versions: Burl Hammonds (Marlinton, West Virginia) via the group Ship in the Clouds (Indiana) [Brody]; Zenith String Band (Connecticut) [Carlin]; Bill Christopherson & Tom Phillips [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 41. Johnson (Kitchen Musician No. 2: Old-Timey Fiddle Tunes), 1982 (revised 1988, 2003); pg. 8. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, vol. 1), 1994; pg. 24. Bay 209, "The Gypsy Gyppo String Band" (1977. Learned from Burl Hammons via Jenny Cleland {of the Highwoods Stringband}). Carryon Records 005, "The Renegades" (1993). Flying Fish, Red Clay Ramblers ‑ "Stolen Love" (1975. Collected from Burl Hammons in 1970). Folkways 31062, Ship in the Clouds ‑ "Old Time Instrumental Music" (1978). Green Linnet, "Pigtown Fling." Reed Island Ramblers - “Wolves in the Wood” (1997). Jim Martin Productions JMP201, Gerry Milnes (et al) – “Gandydancer.” Rounder 0018, Burl Hammonds ‑ "Shaking Down the Acorns." Rounder 0132, Bob Carlin ‑ "Fiddle Tunes for the Clawhammer Banjo" (1979). Rounder 1504/05, “The Hammons Family.” Wheatland Records, the Henrie Brothers ‑ "Wheatland Festival 1978." Reed Island Ramblers (1996).

See also listing at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:Big Scioty

M:4/4

L:1/8

K:G

|:DE|GABG AGED|EDEF G2 ((3D/E/F/|G)ABG AGED|EDEF G2 ({DEF}G2)|

GFGA Bc d2|e3 f e2 d2|BAGB AGEG|E G2 F G2:|

|:z e|gfga gedg|egab a3 e|gfga gedc|Bdef e3 (e|e)fgf edBd|B e2 f e2 (e2|e)fgf edBd|

B e2 f e2 A2|BAGB AGED|D {EF}G2 F G2:|

X:2

T:Big Scioty

M:C|

L:1/8

N:The ‘B’ part is irregular

S:Bruce Molsky, based on Burl Hammon’s version
Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

D(E|G)ABG AGEG|A G2 G G2 Ad|BAGB AGEG|A G2 D G2 DE|

GBAd BGAG|B [e3e3] [e2e2]d2|{Bc}BABG AGEG|A G2 G G2 (DE|

G2) BG AGEG|A G2 D G2 Ad|BAGB AGEG|A G2 G G2 DE|(3GAB Ad BGAG|

B [e3e3] [e2e2]d2| {Bc} BABG AGEG|A G2 A G2 D2||g3 g2a ba g2|e a2 b ag e2|

g3 (g e)dBA|B [e3e3] [e2e2] e2|[ee][ee]fg e2 d2|B [e2e2] [ef] [e3e3][ee]|

[ee][ee]fg [e2e2] d2|B [e2e2] [ef] e2 d2|BABG AGEG|A G2 A G2 D2|

g3 g2 a ba g2|e a2 b ag e2|g3 g edBA|B [e3e3] [ef] [e3e3] [ee]|[ee][ee]fg e2 d2|

B [e2e2] [ef] e2 d2|BABG AGEG|A G2 A G2||

           

BIG SHIP, THE. AKA and see "Glise de/a Sherbrooke." English, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), vol. 2, 1954; pg. 25.

           

BIG SHIP COME OVER THE BAY, THE. AKA and see “The Bouchaleen Buidhe,” “Kitty’s Wedding [2],” “McArdle’s Favorite,” “Out on the Ocean [2],” “Paddy the Dandy [1],” “Pride of Leinster,” “Ships in Full Sail,” “The Three Little Drummers [2].”

           

BIG SNUG’S REEL. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. ACCDD. Composed by accordion player John Whelan for one of his students. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 254, pg. 136.

X:1

T: Big Snug's Reel

C: John Whelan

Q: 350

R: reel

Z:Transcribed by Bill Black

M: 4/4

L: 1/8

K: D

f2 ed f2 ed | BdAd BdAd | f2 ed f2 ed | BABc dAFA |

f2 ed f2 ed | BdAd BdAd | f2 ed f2 ed | BABc dAFE ||

FA (3AAA FADd | cA (3AAA EFGE | FA (3AAA FADd | cded cAGE :|

FD (3DDD A,DFA | GE (3EEE =CEGE | FD (3DDD A,DFA | (3Bcd ed cAGE :|

           

BIG SWEET TATERS IN SANDY LAND. AKA and see "Great Big Tater(s) in Sandy Land," "Sally Ann [3]." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA; Kentucky, Ozark Mountains. G Major. GDgd tuning. AABB. A traditional tune usually known as "Great Big Taters in Sandy Land" (see that listing for more), collected in the Ozarks and recorded under this title by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph for the Library of Congress in the early 1940's. Jeff Titon recorded a version in the field from the playing of Clyde Davenport (Monticello, Wayne County, Ky.) in 1990. A version of the well‑known "Sally Ann [1]” and “Sail Away Ladies [1].” Source for notated version: Clyde Davenport (Ky.) [Titon]. Titon (Old-Time Kentucky Fiddle Tunes), 2001; No. 7, pg. 38. Rounder 0435, Stan Jackson – “Traditional Fiddle Music of the Ozarks” (1999). Sonyatone 201, “Eck Robertson Master Fiddler” (1976).

 

BIG TATER. AKA and see "Molly Baker."

 

BIG TATERS IN THE SANDY LAND. See "Great Big Tater(s) in Sandy Land." In the repertoire of Texas fiddler Bob Wills under this title.

 

BIG TEXAS. AKA and see "Grand Texas." Cajun. Modern Records Mod-20-612, "Papa Cairo" (Julius Lamperez).

 


BIG TIME IN OUR HOUSE. AKA and see "Fine Times at Our House." Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, Ozark Mountains. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by folklorist/musicologist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.

 

BIG TOWN FLING. Better known under the title "Pigtown Fling." Gennett 6088 (78 RPM), Uncle Steve Hubbard and His Boys, c. 1928.

 

BIG WILLIE’S WEDDING. Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by County Cavan/Philadelphia fiddler and composer Ed Reavy (1898-1988). Big Willie was a character in Barnagrove, County Cavan, where Reavy grew up. Ed’s son Joseph says that Willie was a “sight to behold” and did not marry “in the grand tradition.” Reavy (The Collected Compositions of Ed Reavy), No. 111, pg. 124.

 

BIG WHEEL, THE.  Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Source for notated version: transcribed by Randy Miller from a broadcast of a Fleadh Cheoil in 1978 [Miller]. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 122, pg. 82.

 

BIGAILLE, LA. French, Valse (3/4 time). G Mixolydian. Standard tuning. ABB. Composed by F. Bordois. Stevens (Massif Central), 1988, vol. 2; No. 63.

 

BIGGERLO. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. The title, reminiscent of "Buggerboo," appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.

 

BIGGEST PRICK IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.

 


BILE THEM CABBAGE DOWN. AKA ‑ "Boil Them Cabbage Down," "Bake Them Hoecakes Brown." AKA and see “Carve Dat Possum [1],” “Possum Pie.” Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA; Oklahoma, Arkansas, southwestern Pa., northeast Alabama. D Major (Bayard, Thede): A Major (Beisswenger & McCann, Reiner, Ruth, Sweet): G Major (Silberberg). Standard or AEae (McMichen) tunings. One part: AABB (Sweet): AA’BB’CC’ (Beisswenger & McCann): AABBCCDD’ (Ruth). The word 'bile' means 'boil'. Ralph Rinzler traces the tune to an early English country dance “Smiling Polly,” in print in 1765. “Bile Them Cabbage Down” is commonly found in beginning fiddle instructors and in ditty‑books, and is "a negro reel tune which has become universally popular among white square dance musicians” (Alan Lomax). African-American origins are evident in collections of White, Scarborough and Brown—all from black informants. Tennessee banjoist and entertainer Uncle Dave Macon recorded one of the first versions of the song in 1924; that same year Georgia fiddler and entertainer Fiddlin’ John Carson, and Georgia guitarist and singer Riley Puckett both separately recorded the tune. Clayton McMichen put together a virtuoso version of this tune to use in competition at various major fiddle contests. Also played by Arthur Smith on his radio broadcasts (Frank Maloy). The tune was Clayton McMichen's favorite contest tune, by his own account (Charles Wolfe). Richardson, in "American Mountain Songs", pg. 88., thought the tune was derived from "Oh Susanna." The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by folklorist/musicologist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Cauthen (1990) found evidence the tune was commonly known in northeast Alabama from its mention in two sources: reports of the De Kalb County Annual (Fiddlers') Convention 1926‑31, and in the book Sourwood Tonic and Sassafras Tea (where it was listed as one of the tunes played by turn of the century Etowah County fiddler George Cole). Richard Nevins believes the tune was not known in the Mt. Airy, N.C., musical community until the advent of the phonograph. Beisswenger & McCann (2008) note that Ozark fiddlers typically employ the “Nashville shuffle” bowing pattern when playing this tune, and that it is often used as the vehicle for contest fiddlers to show off crowd-pleasing virtuostic techniques.

***

African-American collector Thomas Talley was the first to publish the text of the song in his book Negro Folk Rhymes (1922, reprinted in 1991 edited by Charles Wolfe). His lyric (No. 232, “Cooking Dinner”) goes:
***
Go: Bile dem cabbage down.

Turn dat hoecake ‘round,

Cook it done an’ brown.

***
Yes: Gwineter have sweet taters too.

Hain’t had none since las’ Fall,

Gwineter eat ‘em skins an’ all.

***

Modern lyrics go:

***

Bile them cabbage down,

Bake that hoecake brown;

The only song that I can sing

Is ‘Bile Them Cabbage Down.’

***

Sources for notated versions: Claude Thompson (Cotton County, Oklahoma) [Thede], John Nicholson (Fayette County, Pa., 1949) [Bayard]; Roger Fountain (b. 1948, of Pineville, Arkansas) [Beisswenger & McCann]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 219, pg. 173. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozarks Fiddle Music), 2008; pg. 33. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1977; pg. 8. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 118, pg. 41 (appears as “Bake Those Hoe Cakes Brown”). Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 9. Sweet (Fifer’s Delight), 1964; pg. 76 (includes variations, and appears as "Boil the Cabbage Down"). Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 69. Recorded by numerous North Georgia bands: Riley Puckett and Gid Tanner (1924), The Skillet Lickers (1928), Earl Johnson (1928), and the Georgia Wildcats (1937) {Clayton McMichen's band}. County 723, Fred Cockerham, Tommy Jarrell & Oscar Jenkins ‑ "Back Home in the Blue Ridge". Paramount 3151 (78 RPM), 1928, The Dixie Crackers {North Georgia}. Heritage 048, "Georgia Fiddle Bands" {Brandywine, 1982}, (1983). Vocalion 14849 (78 RPM), Uncle Dave Macon (1924). Roger Fountain – “Cloggin’ Jiggin’ Waltzin’ Two-Steppin’” (2000).

 

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

© 1996-2009 Andrew Kuntz

Please help maintain the viability of the Fiddler’s Companion on the Web by respecting the copyright.

For further information see Copyright and Permissions Policy or contact the author.

 

 


 [COMMENT1]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT2]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - On.

 [COMMENT3]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT4]Note:  The change to pitch (12) and font (1) must be converted manually.