The Fiddler’s Companion

© 1996-2009 Andrew Kuntz

__________________________________________

HOME        ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

              

MOO - MORM

 

 

Notation Note: The tunes below are recorded in what is called “abc notation.” They can easily be converted to standard musical notation via highlighting with your cursor starting at “X:1” through to the end of the abc’s, then “cutting-and-pasting” the highlighted notation into one of the many abc conversion programs available, or at concertina.net’s incredibly handy “ABC Convert-A-Matic” at

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html 

 

**Please note that the abc’s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc conversion programs. For example, I use abc2win and abcNavigator 2 with no problems whatsoever with direct cut-and-pasting. However, due to an anomaly of the html, pasting the abc’s into the concertina.net converter results in double-spacing. For concertina.net’s conversion program to work you must remove the spaces between all the lines of abc notation after pasting, so that they are single-spaced, with no intervening blank lines. This being done, the F/C abc’s will convert to standard notation nicely. Or, get a copy of abcNavigator 2 – its well worth it.   [AK]

 

 

 

MOON AND SEVEN STARS, THE. AKA and see “The Grand Parade [1],” "Seven Stars,” “The True Briton." English (originally), American; Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune under this title dates to around 1750, though as "Seven Stars" it may be somewhat older (according to Pete Coe, West Yorks, U.K.). New Hampshire contra dance musician Randy Miller gives that it was an old fife tune in America where it was called "The Moon and Seven Stars,” a title he suggests was influenced by freemasonry. See note for "Seven Stars" for more information. Source for notated version: Cathie Whitesides [Silberberg]. Miller (Fiddler’s Throne), 2004; No. 79, pg. 58. Silberberg (Tunes I Learned at Tractor Tavern), 2002; pg. 103. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 139. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 79. Sage Arts 1101, Erin Schrader - "Enrichez Vous" (1991). Randy Miller - "Lore of the Fingerboard" (1990).

X:1

T:Moon and Seven Stars, The

T:Seven Stars

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

d2A A2F | GAB A3 | Bcd efg | fed cBA | d2A A2F | GAB A3 | Bcd efg | Adc d2 :|

|: e2A A2f | efg f3 | efg fed | cde A3 | BGB AFA | BGB AFA | Bcd cde | Adc d2 :|

                       

MOON BEAMS, THE.  English, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody appears in the music manuscript copybook of fiddler John Burks, dated 1821. Unfortunately nothing is known of Burks, although he may have been from the north of England.

X:1

T:Moon Beams, The

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:John Burks music manuscript copybook, dated 1821

K:G

d|gdBd|gdBd|gabg|afdf|gdBd|gdBd|edef|g2z :|

|:A|A2 df|e^cAc|d2 fa|ge^ca|agfg|agfb|agfe|d2 ef|

gdBd|gdBd|gabg|afdf|gdBd|gdBd|edef|g2 z:|

 

MOON BEHIND THE MOUNTAIN. American, Polka. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Source for notated version: Jim Childress with Uncle Henry's Favorites [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), vol. 2, 1995; pg. 354.

                       

MOON OVER THE MOUNTAIN.  American, Jig. E Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AA’BB’. Composed by Vermont fiddler Pete Sutherland. Sutherland (Bareface), 1984; p. 6.

 

MOON SHINES BRIGHT, THE.  English, Irish; Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AA’BB’. Adapted for dancing in Britain from the Irish song recorded by De Danaan, originally as “And the Moon Shone Bright and Clearly.” Callaghan (Hardcore English), 2007; p. 43.

 

MOONCOIN JIG, THE (“Port Muin-Cuine” or “Port Muine Coinin”). AKA and see “The Major [3].” Irish, Double Jig. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABBCC. Mooncoin, or Mooncoyne, is a town in County Kilkenny in the southeast of Ireland, an area famous in the 19th century and the early 20th century for its pipers. One of these, by the name of James Byrne, was ‘discovered’ in Mooincoin in 1904 by the clerics and Irish music enthusiasts Father Henebry and Father Fielding, who managed to record Byrne on an Edison cylinder. Excited by their find, they arranged to have him conduct a class for aspiring pipers and they acquired a venue. Unfortunately, the two priests had not reckoned with the ‘microbe of vagrancy’, as O’Neill puts it, and were at pains to locate the piper who was loath “to submit to the restraints of a settled residence or the monotony of steady employment. So away he went to enjoy the pleasure of conviviality and change of scene, leaving his kind-hearted benefactors in a fit mood to appreciate the feelings of the man who undertook to domesticate wild ducks” (Breathnach, 1997). "The Mooncoin" is nearly identical to the Scottish/English tune “The Major [3]” (which dates at least to 1742), and is related to “Denis Delaney” and the march “King William’s Rambles.”  Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 55, pg. 24. Mulvihill (1st Collection). O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915; No. 153, p. 87. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; p. 58. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 1034, p. 193. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907; No. 246, p. 55. Lochshore CDLDL 1215, Craob Rua - “The More That’s Said the Less the Better” (1992). Shaskeen Records OS‑360, Andy McGann, Felix Dolan, Joe Burke ‑ "A Tribute to Michael Coleman" (c. 1965).

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:Mooncoin Jig, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 246

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

e/d/|cBA AEA|AEA Bcd|cBA Ace|dBG Bcd|cBA AEA|AEA Bcd|Ace gfe|dBG Bcd:|

|:cde efg|f/g/af ged|cde efg|f/g/aA Bcd|cde efg|afd bge|afd gec|dBG Bcd:|

|:cBA Aaf|ecA Bcd|cBA gfe|dBG Bcd|cBA Aaa|Agg Aff|Aee efg|dBG Bcd:|

                       

MOONCOIN REEL, THE ("Seisd Muincuin" or "Cor Muine-Coinin"). Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). Mooncoin, or Mooncoyne, is a town in County Kilkenny in the southeast of Ireland, an area famous in the 19th century and the early 20th century for its pipers. Source for notated version: Father Dollard, a flute player and fiddler, member of O’Neill’s traditional music club in Chicago [O’Neill]. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AA'BB' (O'Neill/Krassen). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; p. 137. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 1431, p. 265. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907; No. 668, p. 119.

X:1

T:Mooncoin Reel, The

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 668

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

(3ABc|d2 AF DFAc|dced cAAc|BAGF GABc|dced cABc|d2 AG DFAc|dced cABc|

BAGF GABc|dcec d2||de|fdad fdad|fdad fddf|ecgc ecgc|ecgc ecce|fdad fdad|

fdad fddf|g2 gf gbag|fdec d2||

                       

MOONEY’S REEL. AKA and see “The Milkmaid [4],” “Paddy Ryan’s Dream [1],” “Tommy Peoples (Reel) [2].” Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. G Major. Standard tuning. ABB’. Called ‘the County Donegal version of “Paddy Ryan’s Dream.”’ Caoimhin Mac Aoidh remarks that the “Mooney’s” title was not named for famous fiddlers Francie and Mairead Mooney, but that “the name is older than that and this specific Mooney was a renowned character.” Source for notated version: New Jersey flute player Mike Rafferty, born in Ballinakill, Co. Galway, in 1926 [Harker]. Harker (300 Tunes from Mike Rafferty), 2005; No. 153, pg. 47.

See also listings at:

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

                       


MOONLIGHT CLOG. Cape Breton, Old‑Time; Schottische. The tune is to be found not only in Cape Breton tradition (recorded by Cape Breton fiddler Angus Chisholm for Decca in the 1930's) but was common among Southern fiddlers as well (it was recorded by Mississippi fiddler Gene Clardy in 1930) [Tony Russell]. Clardy was one of the older Mississippi fiddlers to record in the 78 RPM era. It is said he taught Mississippi fiddling great Willie Narmour to play. In between those geographical extremes, the melody was cited as having commonly been played at country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly). It may appear in Cole's 1000 (1940). Document 8028, Gene Clardy & Stan Clements – “Mississippi String Bands, Vol. 2” (reissue). Shanachie 14001, "The Early Recordings of Angus Chisholm" (Cape Breton).

                       

MOONLIGHT JIG, THE. Irish, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: "Copied from a MS. book lent me by Surgeon‑Major‑General King of Dublin (abour 1885), who copied them 40 years previously from an old MS. book in Cork" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 367, pg. 168.

X:1

T:Moonlight Jig, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A2B {B}AFD|Bcd d>cB|ABA AFD|G3 F2E|F/G/AB AFD|efg fed|e>fe ecA|d3d3:|

|:fga afd|cde efg|fed cde|A3 A2G|FDG FDA|BGB BGg|fed c/d/ec|d3d3:|

                       

MOONLIGHT MOORINGS. English, Waltz. Standard tuning. AB. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; pg. 134 (appears as “Turn of the Tide,” the name of a country dance by Ron Coxall set to the tune).

 

MOONLIGHT ON THE LOUGH. Irish, March (4/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Source for notated version: the Rice-Walsh manuscripts, a collection of music from the repertoire of Jeremiah Breen, a blind fiddler from North Kerry, notated by his student [O’Neill]. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 75.

X:1

T:Moonlight on the Lough

M:4/4

L:1/8

S:Rice-Walsh manuscripts

Z:Paul Kinder

K:G

BA|G2 GG GABc|dBge d2 ga|b2 ag edef|gfga g2 d/2c/2B/2A/2|

G2 GG GABc|dBge d2 ga|b2 ag edea|g2 gg g2||

ga|b2 bg edef|gfga b2 GA|B2 ge dBAG|A2 AA A2 d/2c/2B/2A/2|

G2 GG GABc|dBge d2 ga|b2 ag edea|g2 gg g2||

                       

MOONLIGHT RAMBLE [1], A (Aisdear Faoi Solas Na Re). AKA and see “Fife Hunt.” Irish, Reel. C Major. Standard tuning. AAB (O'Neill/1001): AABB' (O'Neill/Krassen). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 144. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 694, pg. 123.

X:1

T:Moonlight Ramble, A [1]

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 694

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

gf|e>c {d}(3cBc G>E {F}(3EDE|Dd{e}d^c ~d3f|ec {d}(3cBc GFED|CcBd c2:|

||cf|ecgc acgc|Ad{e}d^c ~d3f|ecgc acgc|GcBd ~c3f|ecgc acgc|Ad{e}d^c ~d3f| (3efg ag fedc|GcBd cegf||

 

MOONLIGHT RAMBLE [2], THE (An Siubal Faoi Soluis N-Gealuige). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major/Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AAB. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 594, pg. 104.

X:1

T:Moonlight Ramble, The [2]

L:1/8

M:3/4

N:”Slow”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 594

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

d{e}d/>c/|B2 AA/>B/ =cA|G{G}F/>E/ D2 D/E/F/G/|

A/B/A/G/ FA/G/ EG/F/|DD D2:|

||A/B/c/d/|~e>f gfed|c>B A2 e/f/g/e/|d>c/4B/4 A>B/A/4 A/G/E/F/|

DDD z dd/>c/|B2 AA/>B/ =cA|G{G}F/>E/ D2 D/E/F/G/|

A/B/A/G/ F/A/G/F/ E/G/F/E/|DD D2||

                       

MOONSHINE REEL, THE. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Prince Edward Island. A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AA’B. Composed by Wellington, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island, Acadien-style fiddler Edward P. Arsenault (b. 1938). Source for notated version: Edward P. Arsenault [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 102.

                       

MOONSHINER AND HIS MONEY. Old‑Time, Breakdown. County 507, Charlie Bowman ‑ "Old‑Time Fiddle Classics."

                                      

MOORE’S FAVORITE [1]. Old-Time, Breakdown. C Major. Standard tuning. From fiddler John Rountree.

 

MOORE’S FAVOURITE [2]. AKA and see “Rose Tree [1].”

                                                  

MOORIT LAMB. Shetland, Jig. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB'. "Written (by Tom Anderson) in 1973 while watching the antics of a young lamb. 'Moorit' is a colour similar to dark brown, and was very rare at one time" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 46.

                       

MOORLAND WILLIE. See “Muirland Willie.”

 

MOORLOUGH MARY.  Irish, Air (6/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. One part. The district of Moorlough lies in the mountainous region near Strabane, between Derry and Donemana. O Boyle remarks that the words to the song were written by the poet Devine of Moorlough in honor of a local girl, with whom local tradition has it that he remained in love with until they were very old, but never married. John Doherty told O Boyle how he learned the song:

***

Well it happened to be I was comin' down through a place

called Meenaleenaghan, about within ten miles of Glenties,

and I heard a young country girl bringing home the cows

in the evening and whe was singin', and the air of the song

caught my ear and I listened. I waited until the girl came to

the road with the cows and says I 'Miss, that's a beautiful

air'. 'Och indeed', she says 'it's not bad. It's one of my mammy's.'

'I might try to learn that song from you if I can' says I and she

says 'Any time you'd be up raking about the house you can

take the fiddle and get the air,' and that's just how I got it.

***

Source for notated version: fiddler John Doherty (County Donegal) [Ó Boyle]. Ó Boyle (The Irish Song Tradition), 1976; pg. 74.

                       

MOORLOUGH SHORE, THE. Irish, Air . A Dorian. Standard tuning. One part. Cowdery (1990) believes this melody to belong to the "Boyne Water [1]" family of tunes, and similar to the second strain of Joyce's "Foggy Dew [3]" and the second half of "To Seek for the Lambs." Cowdery (The Melodic Tradition of Ireland), 1990; Ex. 48, pg. Topic 12TS314, Kevin Mitchell - "Free and Easy" (1977).

                       

MOPPING NELLY. English, Reel. England, Northumberland. A Dorian. Standard tuning. AABBCC. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 3; No. 513.

                       

MOPSI-DON; WHEN FFORD (Mopsy's Tune; the Old Way). AKA – “Obsidion,” “Upside Down.” Welsh, Country Dance Tune (6/8 time). F Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The melody appears as “Welsh Jigg” in the c. 1820 music manuscripts of Helpstone, Northants, flute player and poet John Clare. Clare gained some notoriety as a poet, but succumbed to an opium addiction and ended his days in as asylum. Source for notated version: The Bardic Museum (1802) [Mellor]. Mellor (Welsh Dance Tunes), 1935; pg. 14.

X:1

T:Welsh Jigg JC.025

M:6/8

L:1/8

Q:240

S:John Clare, Poet, Helpston. (1793-1864)

R:Jig

O:England

A:Northamptonshire

N:
Z:vmp:P. Headford

K:Bb

ABcc 2d|c2B cAF|BcB ded|BcB ded|!

ABcc 2d|c2B A2A|Bcde 2d|cBA B3:||:!

fdf ece|dBd cAF|B2B dcB|A2B c3|!

fdf ece|dBd cAF|dcB gfe|dec B3:||

                       

MOPSY'S TUNE; THE OLD WAY. AKA and see "Mopsi-Don' When Fford," “The Welsh Jig.” Welsh, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. The melody is a version of the Irish tune “The Priest and/in his Boots [1]” (Sagart na mBuatasi/).

X:1

T:Mopsy’s Tune (the Old Way)

T:The Welsh Jig

M:6/8

L:1/8.

R:Jig

K:D Major

cde e2f|e2d ecA|ded fgf|ded fgf|cde e2f|e2d c2c|def g2f|edc d3|:

afa geg|fdf ecA|d2d fed|c2d e3|afa geg|fdf ecA|fed bag|fge d3:|

X:2

T:Mopsi Don

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

K:G

FGA A2B|A2B AFD|GFG BcB|GFG BcB|FGA A2B|

A2B AFD|GAB c2B|AGF G2G::dBd cAc|BGB AFD|

G2G BAG|F2G A2A|dBd cAc|BGB AFD|BAG edc|AFG G2G:|

                                                  

MOR ATA ACI, AN. AKA and see "How Much Has She Got?"

                       

MOR CHLUANA. AKA and see “More of Cloyne.”

                       

MOR NIGHEAN A GHIOBARLAIN. AKA and see "Marion, the Knab's Daughter."

                       

MOR-TIMCIOLL AN DOMAN L'E h-AERACT. AKA and see "(A)round the World for Sport [1]."

 

MORA DHUIT AR MAIDIN!  AKA and see “Top of the Morning!”

                       

MÒRAG. AKA and see "Marion." Scottish, "Very Slow" Air. D Minor. Standard tuning. ABB. "A very old Gaelic air (Gow)." The melody was used by poet Robert Burns for his songs "Young Highland Rover" and "Oh wat is ye wha lo'es me." Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 549. Gow (Fourth Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels), 2nd ed., originally 1800 pg. 33. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1816/1986; No. 119, pg. 47.

X:1

T:Mòrag

T:Marion

M:C

L:1/8

S:Fraser Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

f|d>cA>G F2 G>A|B>GA>F D2 D<f|d>c AG F2 G>A|B>GA>F D2 D:|

^c|d>ef>d e2 ^cA|d>fed =c2 BA|d>ef>g e2 f>d|cA cd/e/ f2 f/g/a/b/|

a>gf>e (d2 d)f|d>cAG F2 G>A|B>GAF D2 Df|d>cAG F2 G>A|B>G A^c/d/ (D2 D)||

X:2

T:Morag

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Very Slow”

B:Gow – Fourth Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels (1800)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

f|d>cAG “tr”F2 G>A|B>GA>F D3f|d>cAG F2 GA|~B>G A>F D3f|

d>cAG “tr”F2 G>A|{A}B>GA>F D3f|d>cAG “tr”F2 G>A|~B>G A>F D3||:

A|d>ef>g (eA) (.A.A)|(df)ed {d}^c>B A>A|~d>e~f>g (fe) (.e.e)|d>cAA {A}~F3g|

{g}a>gfe ~d>efd|{d}c>B AG “tr”F2 G>A|~B>GA>F D3f|d>cAG “tr”F2 GA|{A}B>GA>F D3:||

                       


MORAG OF DUNVEGAN. Scottish, Air (3/4 time) or Waltz. D Major. Standard tuning. AB (Martin): AABB (Little). Composed by Neil Matheson. Little (Scottish and Cape Breton Fiddle Music in New Hampshire), 1984; pgs. 20‑21. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle, vol. 3), 1988; pg. 41.

X:1

T:Morag of Dunvegan

M:3/4

L:1/8

K:D

F4F2|F2E2D2|F2 A4|A6|d4 d2|d2c2d2|B4 A2|A6| F4 F2|F2E2F2|

B4 A2|A6|B4 d2|B2A2F2|E6| D6||d6|d4 B2|A4 D2|D6| F4 F2|F2E2F2|

B4 A2|A6 |d6|d4 B2|A4 D2|D4 E2|F4 F2|A4 F2|E6| D6||

                       

MORAG’S REEL. Scottish, Reel. Composed by Scottish bandleader Bobby McLeod. Green Linnet GLCD 1145, Wolfstone – “Year of the Dog.”

                       

MORAG’S WEDDING. Canadian, Scottish; Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. Dunlay and Greenberg believe the tune may have been a pipe strathspey as they find it it Barry Shears’ Cape Breton Collection of Bagpipe Music, taken from the Angus J. MacNeil MS, a manuscript of pipe tunes from around 1900 found in Cape Breton. Source for notated version: Donald MacLellan, learned from his father, Ronald MacLellan [Dunaly & Greenberg]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 34.

                       

MORAG’S (WALTZ). Scottish, Waltz. Scotland, Shetland Isles. Composed by the late Shetland teacher, composer, collector and fiddler Tom Anderson. BM-91, Buddy MacMaster – “Glencoe Hall.” RC2000, George Wilson – “Royal Circus” (2000).

                       

MORAIR SIM. AKA and see "Lord Lovat's Welcome."

                       

MORAN'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see “Gallagher’s Fancy,” “The Leitrim Fancy [1].” Irish, Hornpipe. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922. Gennett 5451 (78 RPM), Michael Gallagher (uilleann pipes) {1924}. Starr 9567 (78 RPM), Michael Gallagher (uilleann pipes) {1924}.    

                       

MORAN'S RETURN. AKA and see “Blood-Red Rose (To Daunton Me). Irish, Air (4/4 time, "moderately slow, tender"). F Major. Standard. AB. "Written down from singers about 1844" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 4, pg. 5. GIFT 10007, Nollaig Casey and Arty McGlynn – "Lead the Knave."

X:1

T:Moran’s Return

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

N:”Moderately slow: tender”

K:F

A<c|d2G2G2 c>B|A2F2F2 f>g|agfe fdcA|G2 G>A B2 A>c|d2G2G2 c>B|

A2F2F2 f>g|agfe fdcA|G2F2F2||A>G|F2 f2 f3 g|agfe d2 f>e|d2g2 g3a|

bagf g2 f>g|a2 ba g2 ag|fgfd c2 f>g|agfe fdcA|G2F2F2||

                       

MORAY CLUB, THE. AKA and see “Paddy Bartley’s.” Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB'. The Donegal strathspey/Highland “Paddy Bartley’s (Highland Fling)” is a variant of this melody. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 3; No. 166, pg. 19. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 117. Beltona 2103 (78 RPM), Edinburgh Highland Reel and Strathspey Society (1936). Topic 12TS381, The Battlefield Band ‑ "At the Front" (1978).

X:1

T:Moray Club, The

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A,|D2FA dAFD|Eeed cAAc|D2FA dAFD|B,DCE D2D:|

|:A|d2fa gfed|cAeA fAeA|1 d2fa gfed|cdec d2d:|2 dbca BgAf| cdec d2d||

                       

MORAY'S FROLICK. Scottish, Air (6/8 time). D Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. "Very old,” notes Gow. Niel composed a beautiful lament for one James Moray, “Old Abercairney” (see “Niel Gow's Lamentation for James Moray, Esq., of Abercairny), although the connection (if any) with this tune is unknown. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 356. Gow (Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels), 1809; pg. 3.

X:1

T:Moray’s Frolick, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Slowly”

B:Gow – Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels (1809)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Dmin

D/E/|~FD/E/F/D/ ~GE/F/G/E|~d>ef ed^c|~d3 ~=c3|(Ac).A (A/G/)(F/E/)(D/C/)|~FD/E/F/D/ ~GE/F/G/E/|

~d>ef ed^c|{de}f2d =cAG|Add [F2A2d2]::g|{fg}a2d {fg}a2d|”tr”f>ga/b/ {b}agf|{ef}g2c {ef}g2c|

“tr”e>fg/a/ {a}gfe|fd/e/f/d/ ge/f/g/e/|af/g/a/f/ ge/f/g/e/|~f>ed cAG|A>dd [F2A2d2]:||

                       

MORAYSHIRE FARMER'S CLUB, THE. Scottish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). The 18th century was a club-ing age, with literary, social and even gentlemen farmers’ convivial clubs. The Morayshire Farmer’s Club was started by Issac Forsyth (1768-1859), bookseller, and the son of a merchant in Elgin. Forsyth started the first circulating library in the north of Scotland and wrote two books about the area in which he lived, Muckle Issac, a survey of Moray, and Little Issac, an account of its antiquities (Moyra Cowie, The Life and Times of William Marshall, 1999). The club was dedicated to the improvement of agricultural science and “the collection of valuable books on every department of rural economy” (Long, Penny Cyclopædia, 1837). Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 39.

X:1

T:Morayshire Famer’s Club, The

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Marshall1822 Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companon

K:G

D|G2 BG EAFD|G2 Bd gdBG|cedB EAFD|ECFD G2G:|

f|g2 dgBgdg|g2fg aAce|g2dg Bgdg|EAFD G2 Gf|g2 dgBgdg|

g2 fg aAce|gbaf gdBG|EAFD G2G||

                       

MORDINGTON HOUSE. Scottish, Reel. A Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Abraham Macintosh. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Music), vol. 1, 1891; pg. 46.

X:1

T:Mordington House

M:C

L:1/8

R:Reel
S:Glen Collection, vol. 1 (1891)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Amin

E|A/A/A AE CA,EA,|B,GDG B,G,DB,|A,AAE CEA,c|B^GEG A/A/A A:|

B|c/d/e/f/ ga gece|dgBg dgBG|c/d/e/f/ ga gece|dBgB A/A/A AB|

c/d/e/f/ ga gece|dgBg dgBG|ce/f/ ge Ff/g/ af|ecdB A/A/A A||

                       

MORDUANT'S HOUSE. AKA – “Morduant’s Hornpipe.” AKA and see “Negro Sand Dance.” Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Philippe Varlet says the tune appears to have vaudeville connections and was even recorded on a 78 RPM disc as (unfortunately) “N....r Breakdown” by Irish accordion player Terry Lane. Roche Collection, 1982, vol. 3; No. 177, pg. 62.

                       

MORE GROG COMING. Shetlands, Shetlands Reel. Shetlands, Unst. D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. From the island of Unst, Shetland. The term 'grog', referring to an alcoholic drink, stems from the British navy of the mid-18th century. Admiral Vernon, who was called "Old Grog" after the stiff wool grogram coats he wore, decided to water down the Navy's rum, a turn of events not at all pleasing to the average Jack Tar, who began to refer to the diluted drink as 'grog' after the responsible admiral. One who managed to get drunk on the concoction became 'groggy.' Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 123, pg. 77.

                       


MORE HOLLER THAN WOOL. Old‑Time. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.

                       

MORE LUCK TO US (Tuille Sonais Duinn). AKA and see “An Cathasadh Muintre,” “Carrick’s/Carrack’s Reel/Rant,” “Riley’s Favorite,” “The Smith’s a Gallant Fireman.” Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AB (O'Neill/1850): ABB' (O'Neill/Krassen). The melody is similar in parts to “Mary Scott [1],” “An Cothusadh Muintre,” “Riley’s Favorite" and “Whiskey Before Breakfast.” O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 114. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1299, pg. 244. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 564, pg. 104.

X:1

T:More Luck to Us

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 564

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

FE|D2 DF A2 AB|AFdB AFDF|Eeed e2 ef|gefd BABc|d2 DF A2 AB|AFdB AFDF|

G2 BG F2 AF|EFGA B2||A2|dcde dAFA|dcdB A2 FD|EFGA BABd|

gefd B2 AB|dcde dAFA|dcdB AFDF|G2 BG F2 AF|EFGA B2||

                       

MORE N'IGHEAN GHIBERLAIN. AKA and see "The Gaberlunzie's Daughter." Appears in one of James Oswald's 1742 collections entitled "Curious Scots Tunes."

                       

MORE OF CLOYNE (Mór Chluana). Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. One part. Joyce’s source said that More was the guardian fairy of Cloyne in Cork.

***

We read in Irish history of several remarkable women named

Mor. The most celebrated of all was Mór Mumhan, the daughter

of Aedh Bennain (Hugh Bannan, king of west Munster--died

A.D. 614), about whom there is a curious story in the book of

Leinster; in which it is related that she was carried off by the fairies

in her youth; and that ultimately she became the wife of Cathal Mac

Finguine, king of Cashel. Afterwards her sister was similarly

abducted; and was discovered by Mór--who knew her by her

singing--somewhere in the district where Cloyne is situated.

Mór Mumhan (or Mór of Munster) is celebrated in legend

among the peasantry to this day, for her beauty and her

adventures; and perhaps it may not be rash to conjecture

that she was the same as Mór of Cloyne, who gave name

to this air. (Joyce, 1873)    

***

Albert Percival Graves wrote a famous poem, “Mor of Cloyne,” whom he calls a “Munster princess” and who sings a magical song. Early in the 20th century Osborn Bergin, a legendary Irish scholar, wrote his “An t-Amhran Dochas” to More of Cloyne, remarks Neil Mulligan. The melody “Fairies Hornpipe,” popularized by Seamus Ennis, is thought to have derived from this tune.

***

Source for notated version: Lewis O’Brien of Coolfree, County Limerick, 1852 [Joyce]. Joyce (Ancient Irish Music), 1890; No. 47, pg. 48.

X:1

T:More of Cloyne

T:Mór Chluana

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”With Spirit”

S:Joyce – Ancient Irish Music (1890)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

G2G2F2D2 | G2G2 G4 | c2B2c2d2 | e2d2d4 | dggf f2 ed |

dedc B2 AG | ABcA d2 cA | G2 A2 B2 d2 | dggf f2 ed |

dedc B2 AG | ABcA d2 cA | G2G2 G4 ||

                       

MORE POWER TO YE. AKA and see "Se'n Righ atha aguin is fear linn" (We Prefer Our Own King), "Over the River to Charlie [2]," "Royal Charlie," "Wha'll (Who’ll) Be King But Charlie," "Fy Buckle Your Belt," "Behind the Bush in the Garden [1]." Scottish, Jig. C Major ('A' part) & A Minor ('B' part). Standard tuning. AB. A version of one of the "Over the River to Charlie" airs. Hardings All-Round Collection, 1905; No. 56, pg. 17.

                       

MORE POWER TO YOUR ELBOW (Comacds Tuile Le Do Uilleann). AKA and see “The Coalminer’s Reel.” Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AA'B (O'Neill/Krassen). See also Ryan’s/Cole’s reel “Farrell O’Gara’s Favorite” for a version in the key of ‘A’ major, and, in the same volumes, “Pretty Jane’s Reel” and “Stick it in the Ashes.” “Macroom Lasses” is also a related reel. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 146. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1477, pg. 273. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 705, pg. 124.

X:1

T:More Power to Your Elbow

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907), No. 705

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

GE|EGGB AGGB|dGBG AGEG|DGGB AGGg|egdB AGEG|DGGB AGGB|

dGBG AGEG|DGGB AGGg|egdB G2||ef|g2 ge dgge|dBGB AG E2|

g2 ge degb|agab a2 ga|bagb ageg|dGBG AGEG|DGGB AGGg|egdB G2||

                       


MORE THE MERRIER, THE. English, Country Dance Tune (2/2 time). G Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune dates to 1721. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes), 1986. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 33.

X:1

T:More the Merrier, The

M:2/2

L:1/8

K:Gmin

GA|B2 AG ^F2D2|^F2 A4 AB|c2A2d2^F2|G6:|

|:A2|B3c dcde|c2A4 F2|B3c dcde|f2d4 cd|e2d2c2B2|

ABAG ^F2D2|G2 AB A2G2|G6:|

                       

MOREAU'S HACK. AKA and see "Le Hack a Moreau>."

                       

MORECAMBE BAY. English, Country Dance Tune (6/8 time). D Major/Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AABC. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes), 1986.

                       

MOREEN (Moirin). See "Minstrel Boy." Irish, Air (2/4 time). F Major. Standard tuning. AB. The tune for which Thomas Moore set his lyric “The Minstrel Boy.” It first appeared in Neale’s collection of 1787. The title is a variant of the name Maureen. See also the related tune “The Tither Morn.” Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 1967, pg. 270.

X:1

T:Moreen

N:Stanford‑Petrie #1067

N:from O'Neill's MS, 1787

M:2/4

L:1/8

Z:transcribed by Bruce Olsen

K:F

C/2|F/2F/4G/4 B/4A/4G/4F/4|A/2c/2 f/2 e/4d/4||

d/4c/4B/4A/4 G/2F/2|E/4F/4G/4E/4 C3/4E/4|\

F/4C/4F/4G/4 B/4A/4G/4F/4|F/4A/4c/4e/4 f/2e3/4d/4|\

d/4c/4B/4A/4 c/4B/4A/4B/4|G3/4A/4 F3/4||c/2|\

c/2c/4d/4 f/4e/4d/4c/4|d/4f/4e/4g/4 f/2d/2|\

d/4c/4B/4A/4 G/2F/2|E/4F/4G/4E/4 C3/4E/4|\

F/2F/4G/4 B/4A/4G/4F/4|F/4A/4c/4d/8e/8 f/2e/4d/4|\

d/4c/4B/4A/4 c/4B/4A/4B/4|G3/4A/4F|]

                       

MOREEN O'KELLY (Móirín_Ni Chealla). AKA and see "Pilgrimage to Skellig." Irish, Air (9/8 time, "with spirit"). D Major. Standard tuning. AB. "On the Great Skellig rock in the Atlantic, off the coast of Kerry, are the ruins of a monastery, to which people at one time went on pilgrimage‑‑and a difficult pilgrimage it was. The tradition is still kept up in some places, though in an odd form. It is well within my memory that‑‑in the south of Ireland‑‑young persons who should have been married befrore Ash‑Wednesday, but were not, were supposed to set out on pilgrimage to Skelling on Shrove‑Tuesday night: but it was all a make‑believe. It was usual for a local bard to compose what was called a 'Skellig List'‑‑a jocuse rhyming catalogue of the unmarried men and women of the neighborhood who went on the sorrowful journey‑‑which was circulated on Shrove‑Tuesday and for some time after. some of these were witty and amusing; but occasionally they were scurrilous and offensive. They were generally too long for singing; but I remember one which‑‑when I was very young‑‑I heard sung to the following spirited air. It is represented here by a single verse, the only one I remember. The air may be compared with 'The Groves of Blackpool' in Petrie's Music of Ireland. See also "Chalk Sunday" for similar customs.

***

As young Rory and Moreen were talking,

How Shrove‑Tuesday was just drawing near;

For the tenth time he asked her to marry;

But says she:‑‑'Time enough till next year.'

'Then ochone I'm going to Skellig:

O, Moreen, what will I do?

'Tis the woeful road to travel;

And how lonesome I'll be without you!'" (Joyce).

***

Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 110, pg. 56.

X:1

T:Moreen O’Kelly

T:Pilgrimage to Skellig, The

T:Móirín ni chealla

L:1/8

M:9/8

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

d/e/|fef ged cA d/e/|fef gec d2 f/g/|aaf ged cA A/G/|FGA Ad d/{f}e/ d2||

d/c/|B2G A2G FD d/c/|B2G Add/{f}e/ d2 d/c/|B2G A2G FD d/e/|fef gec d2||

                       

MORELEY'S REEL. See "Cottenwood Reel."

                       

MORELLA’S LESSON. See “Murillo’s Lesson.”

                       

MORELLI’S LESSON. See “Murillo’s Lesson.”

                       

MORFARS SCHOTTIS. Swedish, Schottische. A Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. Source: the Internet at http://www.leeds.ac.uk/music/Info/RRTuneBk/images/00/00000000.gif

                       

MORGAN MAGAN. AKA ‑ "Planxty Morgan Megan," “Welch Morgan.” Irish; Slow Air, Planxty or March (4/4 time). G Major (Barnes, Brody, Johnson, Miller & Perron, Ó Canainn, Sullivan): A Major (Complete Collection.., Keegan, O’Sullivan). Standard tuning. One Part (S. Johnson, Keegan): AB (Barnes, Brody, Sullivan): AABB (Complete Collection..., Miller & Perron, Ó Canainn, O’Sullivan). The air was composed by the blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670‑1738) in honor of one Morgan Magan of Togherstown, County Westmeath. Magan died in 1738, and is probably the "Captain Magan" referred to in another of O'Carolan's tunes. Donal O'Sullivan (1958) finds he was a younger son of Morgan Magan of Cloney, Westmeath. His sister Susanna married Sir Arthur Shaen, the subject of another O’Carolan air that bears Shaen’s name. The melody appears to have been first published by John and William Neal in A Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1724) as “Morgan Macgann.” Another early version of “Morgan Megan”, according to the Appendix to the 2001 edition of O’Sullivan’s seminal work, appears in Daniel Wright’s Aria di Camera (London, c. 1730) as “Welch Morgan.”  It was collected by Edward Bunting (1773-1843) and appears in his General Collection of the Ancient Music of Ireland (London, 1809, pg. 71). Source for notated versions: Chieftains (Ireland) [Brody, Sullivan]. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; pg. 60 (appears as “Hillingdon Heath”, the name of a dance by Charles Bolton set to the tune). Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 196. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 92, pg. 72. S. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), No. 1, 1991; pg. 3. S. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician No. 3: Carolan), 1983 (revised 1991, 2001); pg. 8. Keegan (The Keegan Tunes), 2002; pgs. 96-97 (piano arrangement). Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; vol. 1, No. 68 (untitled). Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 2nd Edition, 2006; pg. 145. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 109, pg. 92. O’Sullivan (Carolan: The Life, Times and Music of an Irish Harper), 1958, No. 92. Sannella, Balance and Swing (CDSS). Sullivan (Session Tunes), vol. 3; No. 35, pg. 14. Castle Music CAS 36205-2, Dave Swarbrick – “It Suits Me Well: the Transatlantic Anthology” (2005). Claddagh CC14, Chieftains‑ "Chieftains 4." Front Hall 05, Fennigs All Stars‑ "Saturday Night in the Provinces." Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - “The Morning Dew” (1993). June Appal 028, Wry Straw ‑ "From Earth to Heaven" (1978). North Star NS0031, "Dance Across the Sea: Dances and Airs from the Celtic Highlands" (1990). Rounder 0113, Trapezoid‑ "Three Forks of Cheat." Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1972/1983). Shanachie 97011, Dave Evans - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990). Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick‑ "Swarbrick 2."

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:Morgan Megan

M:2/4

L:1/8

R:Air

C:Turlough O’Carolan (1670-1738)

K:G

D|”G”DG GA/B/|c/B/A/G/ B/c/d|”C”eA “A”AG|”D”G/F/E/F/ DE/F/|”G”G2 G/F/G/A/|

“C”GF/E/ “G”D>G|”D”F/G/A “A”AE/G/|”D”FD DE/F/|”G”G>G “D”A/G/A/F/|

“G”G3B|”C”c>B AB/c/|”G”d2 “C”e2|”G”dB “Am”c/B/A/G/|”D”A/G/F/E/ DE/F/|

“G”G>G “D”A/G/A/F/|”G”(G2 G)d/c/||”G”Bd de/f/|gG B/c/d|gG B/c/d|

”C”e/d/c/B/ “D”A>c|”G”B/A/B/c/ dB|”C”ec “G”dB|”Am”cA “G”dG|

“D”FD DG|”C”EC C>D|EC C>E|”D”FD DA/G/|F/G/E/F/ DB/c/|

”G”d/B/G/B/ “C”e/d/c/B/|c/B/A/G/ “D”F/G/A/F/|”G”DG “D”A/G/A/F/|”G”G2||

                       


MORGAN ON THE RAILROAD [1]. AKA and see “Muddy Creek [2]." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. Source Buck Barnes (1902-1994) was a Madison County, Kentucky, fiddler who lived at the mouth of Jack's Creek, overlooking the Kentucky River. He supposedly obtained the tune from black fiddler Jim Booker, who lived in the same area and who played for a time with an integrated string band, Taylor’s Kentucky Boys. Another fiddler from the same region, John Masters, plays the same melody under the title "Muddy Creek," though he also supposedly learned it from Booker. Masters (1904‑1986) was a left‑handed fiddler from Poosey Ridge in Madison Co. Leatherwood Recordings, Bruce Greene - "Vintage Fiddle Tunes" (1987. Learned from Buck Barnes and John Masters, from recordings made by John Harrod). Rounder 0377, Buck Barnes - “Traditional Fiddle Music of Kentucky, Volume 2 ‑‑ Along the Kentucky River." Yodel‑Ay‑Hee 020, Rafe Stefani & Bob Herring - “Old Paint” (learned from Bruce Green).

 

MORGAN ON THE RAILROAD [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. G Major. Standard tuning. A different tune than “Morgan on the Railroad [1]," played by Jessamine County, Kentucky, fiddler Jim Woodward (1909‑1987), though learned from the same ultimate source as “Morgan... [1]," African-American fiddler Jim Booker. "Morgan On The Railroad [2]" features bluesy phrasing.

                       

MORGAN RATTLER (Murcada Rocalloir). AKA and see “The Cordal Jig,” "Five Hundred a Year," "If I Had in the Clear," “Jackson’s Bouner Bougher,” "Land of Potatoes,” “Marsden Rattler." Scottish, English, Irish, American; Double Jig. England, North-West. D Major (most versions): C Major (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): G Major (Kerr): F Major (Hardings). Standard tuning. AABB (Cole, Kerr): AABBCC (Hardings, Kennedy, Knowles, O’Farrell, Plain Brown): AABBCCDD (Gow): AABBCCDDEE (O'Neill/Krassen): AABBCCDEEFFGGHHIIJJ (O'Neill/1850 & 1001). Partridge’s Dictionary of the Underworld defines a ‘morgan-rattler’ as a loaded club, stick or cane. The phallic association was made clear in a bawdy 18th century song called “Morgan Rattler” about a virile weaver. The song’s refrain goes:

***

I lathered her up with my Morgan Rattler,

***

The song was well-known enough to be referenced in other songs. One was printed in a chapbook by W. Goggin in Limerick about 1785:

***

Great boasting of late we have heard of the fates,

Of the comical rake called Morgan Rattler,

But now we have found one will cut him down

Well known by the name of young Darby O’Gallagher.

***

The verses become rather crude. The fourth goes:

***

If you would see him dandle that yellow sledge handle,

As stiff as the leg of a stool in a wallet, sir,

Each maid with surprise does twinkle their eyes,

At the wonderful size of his D. O’Gallagher.

***

Perhaps not surprisingly, Morgan Rattler was the name attached to several racehorses.

***

O’Neill (1913) states the original of “Morgan Rattler” (before the embellishments) is a two-strain melody called “Jackson’s Bouner Bougher” (found in James Aird’s Selection of Scotch, Irish, English and Foreign Airs, vol. 3, 1788) which carries the name of the Irish composer, uilleann piper and fiddler Walter “Piper” Jackson. In volume five of the series (Glasgow, 1797) Aird printed the same tune, in four parts as “The Morgan Rattler.” This same latter version appears in John Preston’s Entire New and Compleat Instructions for the Fife (London, 1796), Petrie's Third Collection (1790), McGoun’s Repository of Scots and Irish Airs, and in McFadyen’s Selection (1797). A three-strain version appears in Wilson’s Companion to the Ballroom (London, 1816), and, indeed, Barry Callaghan (2007) notes that three strain versions are the norm for modern playing, “with the ‘B’ part showing the most variation.”. English versions are several, many from 19th century fiddlers’ manuscripts including those of William Aylmore (West Wittering, Sussex, 1796), Joshua Gibbons (Market Rasen, Lincolnshire, 1820), Ellis Knowles, John Clare (Helpston, Northants, c. 1820), William Mittel (New Romney, Kent, 1799), Joshua Jackson (Harrogate, north Yorkshire, 1798), Yarker and John Fife (Perthshire and at sea, begun in 1780 and continuing until 1804). “Morgan Rattler” appears in many North American musicians’ copybooks as well, including: William Patten (Philadelphia, 1800), Daniel Henry Huntington (Onondaga, N.Y., 1817), fluter Thomas Molyneaux (Shelburne, Nova Scotia, in a volume that indicates he was an Ensign with the 6th Regiment), and P. Van Schaack (Kinderhook, N.Y., 1820). Dance instructions for “Morgan Rattler” appear published in the Phinney’s Select Collection of the Newest and Most Favorite Country Dances (Ostego, N.Y., 1808) and in Henry Moore Ridgely’s commonplace book of 1799.

***

Source for notated version: fiddler and Chicago police Sergeant James O’Neill, originally from County Down, copied from his father’s music books [O’Neill]; from a collection by the London publisher Thompson, late 18th century [Knowles]. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 357. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 53. Gow (Third Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels), 3rd ed., 1792; pg. 30. Hardings All Round Collection, 1905; No. 93, pg. 29. Kennedy (Traditional Dance Music of Britain and Ireland: Jigs & Quicksteps, Trips & Humours), 1997; No. 122, pg. 30. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 1; No. 39, pg. 39. Knowles (A Northern Lass), 1995; pg. 6. O’Farrell (Pocket Companion, vol. II), c. 1806; pg. 109. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 60. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1046, pg. 196. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 257, pg. 57. Petrie (Third Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances), 1790; pg. 5. Plain Brown Tune Book, 1997; pg. 32. Riley’s Flute Melodies, vol. 3, 1820; pg. 84. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 81. Sussex Tune Book. Wilson (Companion to the Ball Room), 1816; pg. 88.

See also listings at:

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

X:1

T:Morgan Rattler

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:O’Neill – Dance Music of Ireland 1001 Gems (1907), No. 257

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

c|GFE DEF|EDE C2c|GFE DEG|A2G ABc|GFE DEF|EDE C2f|ec/B/c dBG|A2G ABc:|

|:c3 ecA|~B3 dBG|c3 ceA|afd efg|c3 ecA|B/A/Bc dBG|~c3 BAG|A2G ABc:|

|:cBA BAG|cGF EDC|cBA BAG| A2G ABc|cBA BAG|cGF EcA|GFE DEG|A2G ABc:|

||c3c3|ceg dBG|c>cc ceg|afd efg|c3c3|ceg dBG|~c3 BGE|A2G ABc|

c3c3|ceg dBG|c>cc ceg|afd efg|cde/f/ gfe|dec BAG|~c3 BGE|A2G ABc||

|:ceg ceg|ceg dBG|ceg ceg|afd efg|g/g/ge f/f/fd|e/e/ec d/d/dB|c/c/cA B/B/BG|A2G ABc:|

|:GEE CEE|CEE CEE|GEE CEE|A2G ABc|GEE CEE|CEE C2f|ec/B/c dBG|A2G ABc:|

|:c>d/e/f g2e|a2f g2e|c>de/f/ g2e|dBG ABc|c>de/f/ gfe|dec BAG|c3 BAG|A<BG ABc:|

|:c>de/f/ gdB|cGE C2c|c>d/e/f/ gdB|dBG ABc|

c>d/e/f/ gdB|cGF EcA|GFE DEG|A<BG ABc:|

|:EDE C/C/CC|C/C/CC C/C/CC|EDE C/C/CC|A2G ABc|

EDE C/C/CC|C/C/CC C2f|ed/B/c dBG|A2G ABc:|

|:C2c cBc|D2d dcd|C2c cBc|A2G ABc|C2c cBc|D2d def|gfe dcB|A2G ABc:|

X: 2
T:Morgan Rattler
M:6/8
L:1/8
S:Joshua Jackson MS
Z:C.G.P
K:D
|:AFE EFG|FEF D2B|AFE EFD|B2A Bcd|!AFE EFG|FEF D2d|dcB edc|B2A Bcd:|!
|:dcd fed|cAc edc|ded fed|f2e fga|!d2e f2g|agf edc|dcB edc|B2A Bcd:|!
|:D2d dcd|E2e ede|D2d dcd|BcA Bcd|!D2d dcd|E2e efg|agf edc|B2A Bcd:|]

X:3
T:Morgan Ratler
C:Aylmore MS
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:D
d|: AGF EFG | FEF D2d | AGF EFG | B2c Bcd | AGF EFG | FEF D2A | def edc | B2A Bcd:|
|: d2e fdB | c2d ecA | d2e fdB | g2e fga | d2e fdB | c2d ecA | def ecA | B2A Bcd :|
|: D2d dcd | E2e ede | D2d dcd | B2A Bcd D2d dcd | E2e efg | agf edc | B2A Bcd :|

X:4

T:Morgan Rattler, The

C:Trad., Irish?

S:Petrie's Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances &c., 1790

Z:Steve Wyrick <sjwyrick'at'astound'dot'net>, 2/28/04

N:Petrie's First Collection, page 5

L:1/8

M:6/8

R:Jig

K:D

B|: AGF  EFG|TFEF  D2B| AGF  EFA|TB2A Bcd | AGF  EFG|TFEF  D2A| def  edc|TB2A Bcd:|

|: d2e  fed| c2d  edc| d2e  fed|Tf2e fga | d2e  fed | c2d  efg | afd  ecA | TB2A Bcd :|

|: D2d Tdcd | E2e Tede | D2d Tdcd | TB2A Bcd | D2d Tdcd |  E2e  efg | afd  ecA | TB2A Bcd :|

|: TF3 AFD | TEFE TEDE | TF3 AFD | B2A Bcd | TFEF AFD | EFE  E2c | dfd cec | TB2A Bcd :|

X:5

T:Morgan Rattle

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

B:Gow – Third Collection of Niel Gow’s Reels (1792)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

B|:AGF EFG|(F/G/)AF D2B|AGF EFA|”tr”B2A Bcd|{B}AGF EFG|(F/G/A)F D2 f/g/|

afd ecA|1 B2A Bcd:|2 B2A B2c||:”tr”d2e fdB|”tr”c2d ecA|”tr”d2e fed|”tr”f2e fga|

“tr”d2e fed|cea ecA|afd ecA|1 B2c B2c:|2 “tr”B2A Bcd||:FGF {G}FED|

EFE “tr”E2D|FGF FED|”tr”BdB Bcd|FGF {G}FED|EFE “tr”E2f/g/|

afd ecA|”tr”B2A Bcd:||:D2z/d/ {e}dcd|.E2z/e/ efg|.D2 z/d/ {e}dcd|

”tr”B2A Bcd|D2z/d/ {e}dcd|.E2z/e/ efg|agf edc|”tr”B2A Bcd:||

                                   

MORGANE. French, Valse (3/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Maxou Heintzen. Stevens (Massif Central), 1988; No. 61.

                       

MORGAN’S WHIM.   English, Country Dance Tune (cut time). A Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. The melody is unique to Charles and Samuel Thompson’s Compleat Collection, vol. 3 (London, 1773). Thompson (Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3), 1773; No. 171.

X:1

T:Morgan’s Whim

M:C|

L:1/8

B:Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 3 (London, 1773)

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

e3d {d}c3B|.A(c”tr”BA) .G(F”tr”ED)|(CEA).c (EGB).d|(cA)(ec) “tr”(c2B2):|
|:B3A .G(EGB)|e3d .c(Ace)|a3=g .f(def)|.e(dcB) (B2A2):||

 

MORGIANA. Irish?, Jig. C Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB. Not either of the "Morgiana in ...". Hardings All Round Collection, 1905; No. 48, p. 14.

X:1

T:Morgiana

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

B:Harding’s All-Round Collection, No. 48  (1905)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C

g|:ecc Gcc|Ecc Gcc|EGc cGc|edd d2g|ecc Gcc|

Ecc Gcc|cde gag|ecc c2::c|egg gfe|faa a2a|

gec cBc|edd d2d|egg gfe|faf ABc|d^cd ag^f|gag =fed:|

                       

MORGIANA IN ENGLAND. AKA – “Morgiana,” “Morgnanna.” Irish, Set Dance (6/8 time); English, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB (Kennedy, Trim): AABBCC (Callaghan, Sumner). In the Arabian Nights Morgiana was a brave and sharp-witted slave girl who aids Ali Baba, whom at the end of the tale he frees and betroths to his nephew. Malcolm Douglas suggests the original “Morgiana” tune may have been associated with Sheridan’s The Forty Thieves: A Grand Melo-Dramatic Romance (1806), which included some songs and incidental music. Variants of the title appear in musical literature: Paul Burgess notes there were also tunes with the title “Morgiana in Spain” and “Morgiana in Portugal.” The name Morgiana is also a variant of Morgan le Fay, sister to King Arthur and a famous witch.

***

An early printing of the tune appears in W.M. Cahusac’s Annual Collection of 24 Country Dances for 1809, printed with dance instructions. It also appears in Balls’ Gentleman’s Amusement Book 3 (London, 1815, reprinted in 1830), George Willig’s Collection of Popular Country Dances, No. 1 (Philadelphia, 1812), Riley’s Flute Melodies, vol. 1 (New York, 1814-1816), and Riley’s Flute Melodies, vol. 4 (New York, 1826). In manuscript in Britain it appears in the commonplace book of Edward Russell (Newport, Monmouthshire) of the West Monmouth Local Militia, 1812, in addition to the Gibbons and Thomas Hardy manuscripts noted below. It also appears in the John Clare manuscript (Helpston, Northants, 1820), the Richard Pyle ms. (Nether Wallop, Hants, 1822), and Miss Best’s ms. (c. 1850). Matt Seattle finds the tune on a British sheet published by Gow and Shepherd, which he suggests establishes composition of the tune by Nathaniel Gow. “Morgiana in England” was known in America as well (although simply as “Morgiana”), and, along with the aforementioned American publications, appears in the music manuscript collections of John Beach (Gloucester, Mass., 1801) and fifer Seth Johnson (Woburn, Mass., 1807). Country dance instructions for “Morgiana” were printed in Graupner’s Collection of Country Dances and Cotillions (Boston, Mass., 1808). Sources for notated versions: the 1823-26 music mss of papermaker and musician Joshua Gibbons (1778-1871, of Tealby, near Market Rasen, Lincolnshire Wolds) [Sumner]; the Thomas Hardy family manuscripts, early 19th century (Dorset) [Trim]. Cahusac (Annual Collection of Twenty-Four Country Dances for the Year 1809), 1809; No. 3. Callaghan (Hardcore English), 2007; pg. 73 (appears as “Morgiana”). Kennedy (Jigs & Quicksteps, Trips & Humours), 1997; No. 123, p. 30 (appears as “Morgiana in Ireland” with “Morgiana in England” given as an alternate title). Roche Collection, 1982, vol. 2; No. 281, p. 33. Trim (Thomas Hardy), 1990; No. 66 (appears as "Morgnanna"). Sumner (Lincolnshire Collections, vol. 1: The Joshua Gibbons Manuscript), 1997; No. 120, p. 69 (appears as “Morgiana,” originally set in the key of ‘F’ major).

X:1

T:Morgiana

M:6/8

L:1/8

N:Transposed from the original key of F

S:W.M. Cahusac’s Annual Collection of 24 Country Dances for 1809, No. 3

N:”With proper Directions to each Dance as they are performed at

N:Court, Bath, and all Public Assemblys.”

Z:Transcribed and edited by Flynn Titford-Mock, 2007

Z:abc’s:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A|(AF)A {d/e/}f2e|dcB A2B|(AF)A (dA)f|gfe edB|AFA f2e|dcB A2B|AFA dAd|gec d2||

||e|efe dcB|AAA g2A|fAA dAA|fAA e3|efe dcB|AAA g2A|fAA dAA|edc BAG||

FDE F2A|FDE G2A|G2B F2A|(E3 E)AG|FDE F2A|FDE F2A|B2d c2e|(d3 d2)||

           

MORGIANA IN IRELAND. Irish, Set Dance; English, Jig. A Major (O’Neill, Raven, Roche): B Flat Major (Kershaw): G Major (O’Farrell, Sumner). Standard tuning (fiddle). One part (Raven, Sumner): AABB (Roche): AABBCC (Kershaw, O’Farrell). This was apparently the original Morgiana tune, thought to have derived from Richard Sheridan’s The Forty Thieves: A Grand Melo-Dramatic Romance (1806), music by Michael Kelly. Other Morgiana titles seem to be imitations of this one. In addition to Kershaw and Gibbons (referenced below) the melody can also be found in the music manuscripts of John Clare (Helpston, Northants, 1820), Rev. Robert Harrison (Brampton, Cumbria, 1820), Miss Best (unknown, c. 1850), C.J. Surtees (Northumberland, 1819), Thomas Shoosmith (Arlington, Sussex, early 19th c.), and Edward Russell (Monmouth, Wales, 1812). In print it appears in J. Balls’ Gentleman’s Amusement book 3 (London, c. 1815, reprinted c. 1830), Firth & Hall’s Newly Improved Instuctor for the Clarinet (New York, 1832), Paff’s Gentleman’s Amusement No. 2 (New York, c. 1812), and Riley’s Flute Melodies, vol. 3 (New York, c. 1820). In the latter volume it appears as “Morgiana” with the alternate title “Capt’n Muligan.” Sources for notated versions: copied from O’Farrell’s Pocket Companion (1804-10) [O’Neill]; contained in the Joseph Kershaw manuscript—Kershaw was a fiddler who lived in Slackcote, Saddleworth, North West England, in the 19th century, and his manuscript dates from around 1820 onwards [Kershaw]; the 1823-26 music mss of papermaker and musician Joshua Gibbons (1778-1871, of Tealby, near Market Rasen, Lincolnshire Wolds) [Sumner]. The Joseph Kershaw Manuscript, 1993; No. 28. O’Farrell (Pocket Companion, vol. III), c. 1808; p. 7. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 86. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 128. Roche Collection, 1982, vol. 2; No. 283, p. 34. Sumner (Lincolnshire Collections, vol. 1: The Joshua Gibbons Manuscript), 1997; pg. 69 (originally set in the key of ‘C’ major).

X:1

T:Morgiana in Ireland

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:O'Farrell's Pocket Companion 1804-10

Z:Paul Kinder

K:G

D2 D G2 G|AGA B3|D2 D G2 A|B2 c BGE|

D2 D G2 G|AGA Bcd|edc BcA|G2 G BGE:|

d2 d dcB|e2 f g3|d2 d dcB|e2 f gdB|

ded dcB|efe efg|dec BcA|G2 A BGE:|

|:GFG B2 d|AGA c2 e|GFG G2 A|B2 c BGE|

GFG B2 d|c2 e B2 d|f2 g B2 d|G2 A BGE:||

           

MORGIANA IN SPAIN.  English, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABBAA. Another Morgiania tune that appears in a number of musicians’ manuscript collections from the 19th century, including John Clare (Helpston, Northants, 1820), John Bewich (Northumberland), William Winter (West Bagborough, Somerset), the Welch family (Bosham, Sussex, starting 1800), and James Winder (Wyresdale, Lancashire, 1835). Dance instructions for the tune were printed in G. Graupner’s Collection of Country Dances and Cotillons (Boston, Massachusetts, c. 1808). In America the tune appears in George White’s (Cherry Valley, New York) commonplace book kept from c. 1790 to 1830. Callaghan (Hardcore English), 2007; p. 62.

X:1

T:Morgiana in Spain

M:6/8

L:1/8

Q:120

S:James Winder Ms., Lancashire, 1835-41

R:Jig

O:England

A:Wyresdale, Lancashire

H:1/8

Z:vmp.Chris Partington, Aug. 2004

K:C

E2F G2c|E2F G2c|A2A d2c|Bdc BAG|!

E2F G2c|E2F G2c|E2d BAB|c2c “cr”c3:|!

|d2c B2e|d2c B2G|d2c B2A|B2G G2e|!

d2c B2e|d2c B2e|dec BcA|(GA)F (EF)D|!

E2F G2c|E2F G2c|A2A d2c|B2dc BAG|!

E2F G2c|E2F G2c|E2d BAB|c2c “cr”c3|]

X:2

T:Morgianna in Spain

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:William Mackie ms. (Aberdeen, early 19th cent.)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A|F2G A2d|F2G A2d|B2B e2d|ced cBA|

F2G A2d|F2G A2d|B2e cBc|d3d2:|

|:f|e2d c2f|e2d c2f|e2d c2B|BAA A2f|

e2d c2f|e2dc2f||(eg)d (cd)B|ABG FGE:||

 


MORISCO. AKA – “La Morisque.” English, Country Dance Tune (2/2 time). G Mixolydian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABBCCDD. The melody was first published by Thoinot Arbeau (1520-1595) in his Orchesographie (1589). “La Morisque” or Morisco is the French term for what is known as the Morris dance or Moresc in England, also called the Moresca in Corsica. Thus the title “Morisco” is simply a generic title for a vehicle for morris dancing. Cecil J. Sharp thought the morris dance was Moorish in origin, probably from Morocco (for more information see Sharp & MacIlwaine’s The Morris Book, London, Novello and Company, 1907). Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes, vol. 2), 2005; p. 2 (appears under the title “Albany Assembly,” the name of a modern dance set to the tune). Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; p. 9.

X:1

T:Morisco

L:1/8

M:2/2

K:G Mixolydian

g2g2g2a2|g6 f2|e2d2c2d2|B4G4:|

|:e2c2c2d2|e2c2c2d2|e2c2c2d2|B4G4:|

|:gfga gfga|g2 ef g4|eded cedc|B2 AB G4:|

|:eded c2d2|eded c2d2|eded cedc|B2 AB G4:|

X:2

T:Morisque

M:C|

L:1/8

S:Thoinot – Orchesopgraphie (1589)

K:F

c2c2c2d2|c8|A2F2F2G2|E4 C4:

|:A2F2F2G2|A2F2F2G2|A2F2F2G2|E4C4:|

           

MORLEY'S REEL. See "Cottenwood Reel" (Cape Breton variation).

           

MORMOND BRAES. Scottish, Bothy Ballad (2/4 time). D Major. One part. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 357.

X:1

T:Mormond Braes

Z:Nigel Gatherer

M:2/4

L:1/8

K:C

C|EE E>D|EC C>G|cc cG|A2 G.G| cc ce|GG EG/G/|AG cE|D2 C|]

C|EE E>D|EC C>G|cc cG|A2 GZ| cc c>e|GG EG/G/|AG cE|D2 C|]

           

________________________________________________

 

HOME        ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

© 1996-2009 Andrew Kuntz

Please help maintain the viability of the Fiddler’s Companion on the Web by respecting the copyright.

For further information see Copyright and Permissions Policy or contact the author.