The Fiddler’s Companion

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

[COMMENT1] [COMMENT2] 

FE - FH

[COMMENT3] 

 

Notation Note: The tunes below are recorded in what is called “abc notation.” They can easily be converted to standard musical notation via highlighting with your cursor starting at “X:1” through to the end of the abc’s, then “cutting-and-pasting” the highlighted notation into one of the many abc conversion programs available, or at concertina.net’s incredibly handy “ABC Convert-A-Matic” at

http://www.concertina.net/tunes_convert.html 

 

**Please note that the abc’s in the Fiddler’s Companion work fine in most abc conversion programs. For example, I use abc2win and abcNavigator 2 with no problems whatsoever with direct cut-and-pasting. However, due to an anomaly of the html, pasting the abc’s into the concertina.net converter results in double-spacing. For concertina.net’s conversion program to work you must remove the spaces between all the lines of abc notation after pasting, so that they are single-spaced, with no intervening blank lines. This being done, the F/C abc’s will convert to standard notation nicely. Or, get a copy of abcNavigator 2 – its well worth it.   [AK]

 

 

[COMMENT4] 

FE FE PONCHAUX. Cajun. Columbia 15301‑D, La. Accordion player Joseph Falcon and Cleoma Breaux (1929), also appears on Recorded Anthology of American Music (1978), Joseph Falcon‑‑"Traditional Southern Instrumental Styles."

                       

FEAD AN IOLAIR. AKA and see "The Eagle's Whistle."

                       

FEADAN GLAN A' PHIOBAIR. AKA and see "The Pipe Slang."

                       

FEADGHAIL AN AIRIMH {CONNDAE AN RIGH} [1] (Ploughman's Whistle, King's County). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). F Minor. Standard. One part. The Irish collector Edward Bunting was given the tune by another contemporary Irish collector, Petrie. Bunting was sorely confused regarding this tune, however, mixing references to it up with a similarly titled tune called "Ploughman's Whistle, Queen's County;" this, however, led Petrie, the source for the King's County tune, to correct Bunting and clarify the issue himself in his Ancient Music of Ireland (1855). O'Sullivan Bunting, 1983; No. 126, pg. 182.

 

FEADGHAIL AN AIRIMH [2] (The Ploughman's Whistle). Irish, Air (3/4 time). F Minor (?). Standard. One part. O'Sullivan (1983) finds a variant of this melody in Walker's Irish Bards No. XIII, at the end. Source for notated version: the Irish collector Edward Bunting noted the tune from the harper Byrne in 1803. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 137, pgs. 194-195.

                       

FEADOIR AN MEARA HARRISON. AKA and see "Mayor Harrison's Fedora."

                       

FEAGH AN GEALEASH (Try if it is in Tune). AKA - "Faigh an Gleas" (Find the Key). Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Mixolydian {?}. Standard. One part.  The Irish collector Edward Bunting describes the piece as "an ancient Irish prelude" in the introduction to his 1840 collection. The tune was one given to Bunting by Hempson, the last of the very old brass-strung harpers, at the time of the 1792 Belfast Festival to which all the surviving old Irish harpers were invited. Bunting says:

***

It was with great reluctance that the old harper was prevailed

on to play even the fragment of it here preserved, to gratify

the Editor, to whom he acknowledged he was under obligations.

He would rather, he asserted, have played any other air, as

this awakened recollections of the days of his youth, of friends

whom he had outlived, and of times long past, when the harpers

were accustomed to play the ancient caoinans or lamentations,

with their corresponding preludes. When pressed to play,

notwithstanding, his peevish answer uniformly was, "What's

the use of doin’ so? no one can understand it now, not even any

of the harpers now living.

***

O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 156, pgs. 212-214.

                       

FEAR A' BHATA. AKA and see "The Boatman [3]." Scottish, Air.

                       

FEAR A FIGUE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. Nigel Gatherer learned from one of his students that a a ‘pig’ is an old Scots term for a stone bottle meant to be filled with hot water and placed under the sheets to warm them. The Gaelic word to bottle is phige, and the man who supplied them was know as fear a’ phige, or the bottle man.

X:1
T:Fear A Figue
D:Horses for Courses by the Riverside Ceilidh Band
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:A
A>Ac>e A>Ac>e|A>Ac>A F2 E2|A>Ac>e A>Ac>e|A>Ac>A B2 B2|
A>Ac>e A>Ac>e|A>Ac>A F2 E2|A>AA>A f>ec<A|B>AB<c A2 A2|]
A>AA>A A>AA>A|A>AA>A F2 E2|A>AA>A A>AA>A|A>AA>A c2 B2|
A>AA>A A>AA>A|A>AA>A F2 E2|A>AA>A f>ec<A|B>AB<c A2 A2|]

                       

FEAR A FUAIR BAS, AN. AKA and see “Charley the Prayermaster,” “Cow-boys’ (Jig) [1],” “I Will if I Can [2].” Treoir, 1970.

                       

FEAR A TIGE, AN. AKA and see "The Man of the House."

                       

FEAR ANNSA RAE, AN. AKA and see "The Man in the Moon."

                       

FEAR BOCHT SCALLTA, AN. AKA and see "The Scalded Poor Man."

                       

FEAR DEARMADAC, AN. AKA and see "The Absent-Minded Man."

                       

FEAR MOR, AN. Irish, Set Dance (9/8 time 'A' part & 6/8 time 'B' part). D Major. Standard. AABB. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 2; No. 279, pg. 32.

                       

FEAR-TAILCE AN BEIDLEADOIR. AKA and see "Hardy Man the Fiddler."

                       

FEAR UA INBAR-CINN-TRAGA, AN. AKA and see "The Man from Newry."

                       

FEARGAN. Scottish, Reel. A Mixolydian or A Mixolydian ('A' part) & C Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB. See “Bird’s Nest” for a Canadian variant. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 2; No. 58, pg. 9. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 46.

X:1

T:Feargan

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Aminor

cA A/A/A E2 EG|A2AB cded|cA A/A/A E2 E^F|GABc dBGB:|

|:c2cd e^fge|c2ce dBGB|c2cd e^fge|a^fge dBGB:|

                       

FEARGHAL Ó GADHRA (Farrell O'Gara). AKA and see “Farrell O’Gara.”

                          

FEARLESS BOYS, THE (Na Buacaillide Gan Eagal). AKA and see “Battle of Cremona,” "Health Unto His Leader," "Our President," "Christmas Eve [1]," "(My) Ain Kind Deary (O)." Irish, March (cut time). G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. A marching tune under various titles. Source for notated version: Chicago Police Sergeant James O’Neill, a fiddler originally from County Down and Francis O’Neill’s collaborator [O’Neill]. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1811, pg. 340.

X:1

T:Fearless Boys, The

M:C|

L:1/8

R:March

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 1811

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

(BA) | (G<B) D2 D2 EF | GFGA G2B2 | A^GAB cBA=G | B2E2E2 (BA) |

(G<B) D2 D2 EF | GFGA G2d2 | e^def ge=dc | B2G2G2 :|

|: (AB) | cBcd e2 dc | B^ABc d2 cB | A^GAB cBA=G | B2E2E2 (BA) |

(G<B) D2 D2 EF | GFGA G2d2 | e^def ge=dc | B2G2G2 :|

                       

FEASGAR CIUIN (Lovely Evening).  Scottish, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AB. Morison (Highland Airs and Quicksteps, vol. 1), No. 9, pg. 4.

X:1

T:Feasgar ciuin

T:Lovely Evening

M:C

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”Rather slow”

S:Morison – Highland Airs and Quicksteps, vol. 1

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

D>E F>E F>F d>c | B>A FA> B>B, B,2 | D>E F>E F>F d>c | B>A F>E D>B, B,2 ||

d2 c>B B2 B>A | A4 B>B dd | c2A2 A>A B>B | d>d d2 F>F E>D | C>B, B,4 ||

 

FEASOIGE PAIDIN. AKA and see "Paddy's Whiskers."

                       

FEAST HERE TONIGHT. See “Rabbit in a Log.”

                                   


FEAST OF THE BIRDS, THE. Irish, Slow Air (2/4 time). C Major. Standard tuning. AB. Source for notated version: "...taken down by Forde from 'Paddy Conneely, the Galway piper,' of whom an interesting sketch (with portrait) by Dr. Petrie wo; be found in The Irish Penny Journal, p. 105. To Petrie also he gave many airs which may be seen (with his name) in The Ancient Music of Ireland and in the Stanford‑Petrie collection" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 464, pg. 259.

                       

FEATHER BED. AKA – “Featherbed.” Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA; Magoffin County, Ky. A Mixolydian (‘A’ part) & A Major (‘B’ part). ADae tuning. AAB. In the repertoire of John Salyer (1882-1952), Magoffin County, Ky., whose sons, Grover and Glen, made a home recording of him in the early 1940’s. Gene Winnans mentions that a black banjo player, Gus Cannon, who worked medicine shows between 1914 and 1929, learned a tune called "Feather Bed" in "strumming style" from "Old Man Saul" Russell, who played for his own amusement around his house. Jeff Titon (2001) remarks that, as far as he knows, Salyer is the sole source for the Kentucky fiddle tune. Source for notated version: John Salyer (Salyersville, Magoffin County, Ky., 1941) [Titon]. Titon (Old-Time Kentucky Fiddle Tunes), 2001; No.  38, pg. 70. Berea College Appalachian Center AC003, John M. Salyer – “Home Recordings 1941-42, vol. 1” (1993).

                       

FEATHER BED JIG. AKA and see "Father Bedd Jigg."

                       

FEATHERS [1], THE. Scottish, Scots Measure. B Flat Major (McGlashan): D Major (Aird). Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. The melody also appears in Charles and Samuel Thompson’s Compleat Collection of 200 Country Dances, vol. 4 (London, 1780) and in Neil Stewart’s Selection Collection of Scots, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, Jiggs & Marches (Edinburgh, c. 1788). A manuscript version appears in fiddler John Turner’s commonplace book (Norwich, Conn., 1788). Aird (Selections of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs), vol. II, 1785; No. 129, pg. 47. McGlashan (Collection of Scots Measures), 177?; pg. 2.

X:1

T:The Feathers

M:C

L:1/8
R:Scots Measure

B:McGlashan – Collection of Scots Measures  (177?)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:B_

B>cBG FDFB|d>edc c2B2|b/b/a/a/ g/g/f/f/ e/e/d/d/ c/c/B/B/|A/A/G/G/ F/F/E/E/ DC B,2:|

|:d>efd dced|d>efB dced|g>abB g/a/g/a/ bB|d2c2B4:|

|:B,/C/D/E/ F/E/D/C/ B,/C/D/E/ F/E/D/C/|B,/C/D/E/ F/G/A/B/ c=E F2|B>cBF eded|f>gfd c2B2:|

|:B2dB ec A/B/c/A/|B2de fedc|B2 dB ed A/B/c/A/|Fced d2c2|B2dB ec A/B/c/A/|B2dB ec A/B/c/A/|FBdc c2B2:|

X:2

T:The Feathers

M:C

L:1/8

B:Aird, vol. 2 (1785)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

d>edB A>FAd | fgfe e2 d2 | d’c’ba gfed | cBAG FE D2 :|

|: f>gad fegf | faad fegf | bc’d’d b/c’/b/c’/ d’d | f2 e2 :|

|:D/E/F/G/ A/G/F/E/ D/E/F/G/ A/G/F/E/|D/E/F/G/ A/B/c/d/ e^G A2|d>edA fdge|a>baf (e/d/e/f/ d2:|

|: d2 fd ge (c/d/e/)c/ | d2 ef agfe | d2fd ge c/d/e/c/ | efef f2e2 |

d2fd ge c/d/e/c/ | d2 ef agfe | d2fd ge c/d/e/c/ | Adfe e2d2 :|

 

FEATHERS [2], THE.  English, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABBCC. The tune as printed in Glasgow by James Aird (Selections of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs), vol. 3, 1788, and by T. Skillern in Skillern’s Compleat Collection of Two Hundred & Four Reels…Country Dances (London, 1780), and Thompson 4 (1780). It also appears (as “the Feathers, A Quick Step”) in John Fife’s music manuscript copybook of 1780, written in Perthshire and at sea. Callaghan (Hardcore English), 2007; pg. 72.

X:1

T:Feathers, The [2]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

K:G

D|G2G G2g|gfe d3|c2B A2G|FGA D3|G2G G2g|gfe d2c|

BAG DGF|1 G3 G2:|2 G3G3||:D2D D2d|dcB c2B|

D2D D2c|cBA B2G|G2G G2g|gfe d2c|BAG DGF|1 G3 G3:|2

G3G2||:A|BAB G2A|BAB G2A|BAG BAG|A2D D2A|

BAB G2A|BAB G2d|ecB AGF|G3 G2:|

                       

FEBRUARY REEL. American, Reel. Composed by Irish-style fiddler Dale Russ.

                       

FEDERAL HORNPIPE. AKA and see “Seneca Square Dance.”

           

FEDORA, THE. AKA and see “Mayor Harrison’s Fedora.”

           

FEED HER CANDY. AKA and see "Tell Her Lies and Feed Her Candy."

                       

FEED MY HORSE ON CORN AND HAY. AKA – “Feed Your Horse on Corn and Hay.” Old-time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The tune comes from north-eastern Kentucky fiddler Buddy Thomas, who learned it from his cousin Perry Riley (b. 1893). Source for notated version: Buddy Thomas, 1973 [Titon]. Titon (Old-Time Kentucky Fiddle Tunes), 2001; No. 39, pg. 71. Rounder 0376, Buddy Thomas (et al) – “Traditional Fiddle Music of Kentucky, vol. 1: Up the Ohio and Licking Rivers” (1997).

                       

FEEDING THE BIRDS. Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by New Jersey flute player Mike Rafferty, originally from Ballinakill, with the help of his daughter Mary. Black (Music’s the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 157, pg. 83. Harker (300 Tunes from Mike Rafferty), 2005; No. 38, pg. 12. Green Linnet GLCD  1211, Kevin Crawford – “In Good Company” (2001). Kells Music KM9509, Mike and Mary Rafferty – “The Dangerous Reel.”

X:1

T: Feeding the Birds

C; M. Rafferty

Q: 350

R: reel

Z:Transcribed by Bill Black

M: 4/4

L: 1/8

K: G

F | DGGA B2 ag | efdc AGGF | DGGA B2 ag | edcA G3 F |

DGGA B2 ag | efdc AGGF | DGGA B2 ag | edcA G3 :|

e | fgag fdde | f3 d cABg | fgag fdd^c | dgfa gfga |

b2 af gfde | f3 d cAGF | DGGA B2 ag | fdcA G3 :|

X:2
T:Feeding the Birds
R:reel
C:Mike Rafferty (copyright 1995 Barrel Publishing)
S:Mike Rafferty
H:made up with the help of Mary and the birds outside.
D:Mike and Mary Rafferty, the Dangerous Reel
Z:Lesl
M:C|
L:1/8
Q:1/2=80
K:G
G3F|:DGGA B2{b}ag|efdc AGGF|DGGA B2AG|1 AdcA G3F:|2 AdcA G3F||
|:DGGA B2{b}ag|efdc AGGF|DGGA B2AG|1 AdcA G3F:|2 AdcA G4||
|:fgag fdde|~f3d cAG2|fgag fdd2|dgfa ~g3a|
b2af gfde|~f3d cAGF|DGGA B2AG|1 AdcA G4:|2 AdcA G3F||

                       

FEET WASHING [1], THE. Scottish, Jig. A Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 419. b Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 27.

X:1

T:Feet Washing, The [1]

M:6/8

L:1/8
R:Jig

S:Gow – 3rd Repository   (1806)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

f|ecA A>BA|Bce f2e|(f/g/)af ece|(f/g/)ac B2a|ecA A>BA|Bce f2g|agf ece|(f/g/)ac A2:|

e|(f/g/)ae f2e|(f/g/)af ece|(f/g/)ae f2e|(f/g/)ae B2e|(f/g/)ae f2e|(f/g/)ae ece|(f/g/)af ece|

f(ac) A2c|(f/g/)ae f2e|(f/g/)ae ece|(f/g/)ae f2e|(f(ac) B2e|ecA A>BA|Bce f2e|(f/g/)af ece|f(ac) A2||

 

FEET WASHING [2], THE (An oidhche ro' na phosadh). English, Scottish; Reel. England, North‑West. B Minor (Knowles): C Minor (Athole, Fraser). Standard. AAB (Athole, Fraser): AABB' (Knowles). "The feet washing is certainly a momentous concern, associating ominous trepidation with merriment, exquisitely described, as sung in Gaelic, by Culduthel, and the editor's grandfather, the gentlemen alluded to in the Prospectus. The air is a local pipe reel, of which a number are introduced in this work, not exceeded by any now in circulation, and hitherto neglected, as chiefly performed by pipers, who frequently miss whole bars, or whole measures, rendering the airs scarcely attainable but form the words,‑‑and ordinary performers on the violin  are not ready to take them up, as they require a distinct bow to each note. The editor's father sallied forth with this one, and many others of them, to be noticed in their places, for the first time, when singing to his little grandchildren,‑‑and they, dancing and enjoying his song beyond all the music in the world,‑‑whilst his kindness, and their obedience, gave a mutual encouragement to persevere, till the editor wrote down the music, careless of the words, which he now regrets" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 13, pg. 5. Knowles & McGrady (Northern Frisk), 1988; No. 97. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 266.

X:1

T:Feet Washing, The

L:1/8

M:C|

R:Reel

B:The Athole Collection

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:C Minor

g|:ec c/c/c c2 Gc|Bcde fbfd|ec c/c/c ~c2 Gc|egfd c/c/c g:|

efge defb|dBfB gBfd|efge defb|dBfd c/c/c c2|efge defb|

dBfB gBfd|efg=a bgfe|dBfd c/c/c ~g2||

                       

FEG FOR A KISS. See "Fig for a Kiss."

                       

FEIDLIME AN GLEICEADOIR. AKA and see "Felix the Wrestler."

                       

FEILIMI’S BOAT. AKA and see “Baidin Fheilimi.”

                       


FEILIRE, AN. AKA and see "The Calender."

                       

FEIS HORNPIPE.  AKA and see “Humors of Ballinlass.”

                       

FEIS-RINCE UI LANNAGAIN. AKA and see "Lannigan's Ball."

                       

FEKYET, THE. Fyket?? Scottish, Medley (4/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AB. "Very Old." Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 412.

                       

FELIX. Irish, Air (6/8 time). D Mixolydian. Standard tuning. AAB. “This air was a favourite theme; for I find in the Forde and Pigot Collections many tunes, altered indeed, but evidently modelled on it and with different names.”

***

Oh, Felix, my honey,

I’ve value and money,

A snug and compact little farm;

Three acres of ground,

With a ditch all around,

To keep the potatoes from harm:

A headland of flax

Without tithe or tax;

Dark yarn that the fine frieze is made of;

Geese and turkeys galore,

And myself to the for;--

Now, Felix, what are you afraid of?

***

Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 250, pg. 120‑121.

X:1

T:Felix

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Joyce – Old Irish Folk Music and Songs  (1909)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

N:”With spirit”

K:D Mix

G/A/|BcB A2 B/c/|edA GFD|FGA GFD|D3D2:|

d/e/|fef g2 a/g/|fed d>cA|cdd fef|d2e f2 G/A/|BcB A2 B/c/|

dcA GFD|FGA GFD|D3D2||

                       

FELIX THE WRESTLER (Feidlime an Gleiceadoir). AKA and see “The Cat in the Corner [1],” “Lady Charlotte Murray” [1], “O’Mahoney’s Frolics,” “Puss in the Corner.” Irish, Double Jig. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB'. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 61. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1049, pg. 197. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1986; No. 255, pg. 56.

X:1

T:Felix the Wrestler

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:O’Neill – 1001 Gems (255)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

e|c2A AcA|ecA AB=c|B2=G GBG|dBG Bcd|

c2A AcA|ecA ABc|ded Bcd|ecA A2:|

|:d|c2a aga|efe edc|B2=g gfg|ded dcB|1 c2a aga|efe edc|ded Bcd|ecA A2:|2

cBA dcB|edc fed|cBA Bcd|ecA A2||

                       

FELLOW/FELLER THAT LOOKS LIKE ME, THE. AKA and see “The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue [2],” "Punkin Head," "Over the Waterfall." Old‑Time, Song. Evidently an American stage song, with a tune quite similar to the old-time standard “Over the Waterfall.”

***

The Fellow That Looked Like Me

***

In sad despair I wandered, my heart was filled with woe.

While on my grief I pondered, what to do I did not know.

Since cruel fate has on me frowned, the trouble seemed to be,

There is a fellow in this town the very image of me.

***

 (Chorus:)

Oh, wouldn't I like to catch him, wherever he may be,

Oh, wouldn't I give him particular fits, the fellow that looks like me.

***

One evening as I started up Central Park to go,

I was met by a man upon the road, saying, "Pay me the bills you owe."

In vain I said, "I owe you naught," he would not let me free,

Till (sic) a crowd came around and I paid the bills for the fellow that looked like me.

***

(Chorus)

***

One night as I was walking through a narrow street up town

I was caught by a man upon the road, saying, "How are you, Mr. Brown?"

He said his daughter I had wronged, though the girl I ne'er did see.

He kicked me till I was black and blue for the fellow that looked like me.

***

(Chorus)

***

Then to a ball I went one night just to enjoy the sport,

A policeman caught me by the arm, saying, "You're wanted down to court.

You've escaped me thrice, but this here time I am sure you can't get free."

So I was arrested and dragged to jail for the fellow that looked like me.

***

(Chorus)

***

I was tried next day, found guilty too, just to be taken down

When another policeman just stepped in with the right Mr. Brown.

They locked him up and set me free; oh wasn't he a sight to see?

The homeliest man that ever I saw was the fellow that looked like me.

***

The following variant in the lyrics was collected in tradition from Roscoe and Leone Parish:

***

Oh, wouldn't I like to catch him

Wherever he might be

The way I'd punch his punkin head

The fellow that looks like me.

***

In England the song is from the music hall era (Stanley Holloway) and is known as “The Dark Girl Dressed in Blue,” though it was also popular in England and Ireland as a dance tune. Volo Bogtrotters. Document 8041, The Hill Billies/Al Hopkins and His Buckle Busters: Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order, Vol. 3” (originally recorded May 16, 1927).

                       

FELTON LONNIN. AKA – “Felton Lonnen.” English, Jig. England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB (Bruce & Stokoe): AABBCCDDEEFFGG (Peacock): AABBCCDDEEFFGGHHII (Raven). The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes (called "The Northern Minstrel's Budget") which he published c. 1800. See “Joy be wi’ my love” from the Scottish McFarlan manuscript (c. 1740) for a possible precursor. Felton is a village in Northumberland midway between Morpeth and Alnwick, while ‘lonnen’ is a dialect word in the north of England for a land or road. Whelan’s  History, Topography, and Directory of Northumberland (1855) states that in the mid-19th century “Felton comprises an area of 12,830 acres. Population in 1851, 1,574 souls. The soil of this parish is various but chiefly incumbent upon strong clay, and is well suited for grain crops. There are some coal seams here, but they are not much worked.” The village is approximately 9 miles south of Alnwick on the River Coquet, over which a stone bridge was built, followed by a second bridge in modern times to accommodate increased traffic. It was in Felton that English barons met in 1215 to plan the transfer of their allegiance from King John to King Alexander of Scotland, a decision that greatly annoyed the former, with the result that he had the village burned down as punishment. Stokoe and Bruce remark: "There is a jingling rhyme fitted to this tune to be found in Sir Cuthbert Sharp's Bishopric Garland, but it is there entitled 'Pelton Lonnin'.

***

The swine came jumping down Pelton Lonnin', (x3)

There's five black swine and never an odd one.

Three i' the dyke and two i' the lonnin', (x3)

That's five black swine and never an odd one.

***

Another short rhyme sung to the same air, which we have not yet seen in print, was popular as a nursery rhyme some fifty or more years ago.

***

The kye's come hame, but I see not my hinny,

The kye's come hame, but I see not my bairn;

I'd rather loss a' the kye than loss my hinny,

I'd rather loss a' the kye than loss my bairn.

***

Fair faced in my hinny, his blue eyes are bonny,

His hair in curl's ringlets hung sweet to the sight;

O mount the old pony, seek after my hinny,

And bring to his mammy her only delight.                       (Bruce & Stokoe)

***

There are other verses that were added sometime later, however, Bruce & Stokoe only printed the two above. The High Level Ranters played the tune as a jig and waltz in the early 1970’s. Raven's version is a reprint from "A Tutor for the Northumbrian Small‑pipes" by J.W. Fenwick, published in the late 1800's. High Level Ranters Songbook, 1972. Northumbrian Pipers Tunebook 1. Peacock (Peacock’s Tunes), c. 1805/1980; No. 34, pg. 14. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 97. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 148.

X:1

T:Felton Lonnin’

M:6/8

L:1/8
S:Bruce & Stokoe – Northumbrian Minstelsy   (1882)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Ador

d|e2c dBG|B2G GBd|e2c dBG|c2A Acd|e2c dBG|B2G GAB|cec BdB|cAA Ac:|

|:d|efg gfe|d<gB GBd|efg gfe|e<aA Acd|efg gfe|def gdB|cac BgB|cAA Ac:|

                       

FELTON'S GAVOT. AKA and see "Farewell Manchester." English, Country Dance Tune (2/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard tuning. AB. See notes for  “Farewell Manchester.” Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Times), vol. 2, 1859; pg. 91. Johnson (A Further Collection of Dances, Marches, Minuetts and Duetts of the Latter 18th Century), 1998; pg. 4.

X:1

T:Felton’s Gavot

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Chappell – Popular Music of the Olden Time  (1859)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Eb

G2F2|EA G2|FEDE|G2F2|G2F2|EA G2|FBB=A|B4||

B2A2|Ge c2|B2A2|Ge c2|BE A2|GDEA|G2 F>E|E4||

X:2

T:Felton’s Gavpt

M:2/4

L:1/8

K:A

c2B2|Ad c2|BAGA|B/A/G/F/ E2|c2 B2|Ad c2|BAGA|B4:|
|:e2d2|ca f2|eA d2|ca f2|eA dc/B/|cGAd|c2B2|A4:||

                       

FELTONS HILANDLADDY. Scottish (?), Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning. AABBCCDDEEFFGGHHII. The tune was printed with numerous sets of variations by O’Farrell (c. 1806). O’Farrell (Pocket Companion, vol. II), c. 1806; pgs. 81-83.

X:1

T:Feltons Hillandladdy with Variations

M:C

L:1/8

S:O’Farrell – Pocket Companion, vol. II (c. 1806)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

BA | G2 GB A2 AB | G2 GB (BA)(GF) | GBdg edcB | A2 (3ABc B2 AG ::

d3e d2g2 | d3g edcB | d3e dB g2 | dB g2 edcB | cBcd edcB | A2 (3ABc B2 AG |

GBdg edcB | A2 (3ABc B2 AG :: GBdg Acea | Bdgb afdB | Ggfg edcB | A2 (3ABc B2 AG ::  etc.

                       

FEMALE HERO. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: James Aird’s Selections of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs (1782-97) [O’Neill]. O’Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922; No. 168.

X:1

T:Female Hero, The

M:6/8

L:1/8

S:Aird's Selections 1782-97

Z:Paul Kinder

K:G

Bdc BGB|cAc BGB|B/2c/2dc BGB|ABG FED|

Bdc BGB|cAc BGB|gfe dcB|A2 d AFD:|

|:BAG GDG|BGB gdc|BAG GDG|cAF ABc|

BAG GDG|BGB g2 d|efg dcB|cAF ABc:||

                       

FEMALE SAYLOR/SAILOR, THE. English, Country Dance Tune (6/8 time). G Dorian. Standard tuning. AAB (Barnes): AABB' (Johnson). The tune dates from c. 1706, according to Johnson and Barnes. Barnes, 1986. Johnson (Twenty‑Eight Country Dances as Done at the New Boston Fair), vol. 8, 1988; pg. 4.

 

FEMME QUI CRIE ENCORE, LA (The woman who shouted ‘again’).  French-Canadian, A tune in the repertoire of Gaspésie fiddler Yvon Mimeault (b. 1928, Mont-Louis), although the title was suggested by Yvon’s son. Yvon Mimeault – “Y’ était temps!/It’s About Time.”

                       

FENCE CORNER PEACHES. Old‑Time, Fiddle Tune. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.

                       

FENIAN STRONGHOLD (Cruacan Na Feine). AKA and see "Avenging and Bright." B Flat Major ('A' part) & D Minor ('B' part). Standard tuning. AB. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 539, pg. 94.

X:1

T:Fenian Stronghold

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air

N:”With feeling”

S:O’Neill – Music of Ireland (1903), No. 539

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:Bb

F2 | B2 Bc dB | c2 f3e | d2 B2 B2 | A2F2F2 | B2 Bc dB | c2f3e | d2B2 {d}c2 | B4 ||

K:Dmin

c2 | d2 de fd | c2A2F2 | G2 GB AG | F2D2A2 | d2 de fd | c2A2F2 | G2 GF EF | D4 ||

                       

FENWICK O' BYWELL. AKA and see "Horse and Away To Newmarket," "Newmarket Races," "Galloping Ower the Cow Hill." English, Jig. England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. "This tune appears in John Peacock's 'Collection of Airs for the Northumbrian Small‑pipes,' as 'Newmarket Races,' and in Robert Bewick's MS collection as 'Galloping Ower the Cow Hill.' The two former of these titles refer to a ballad  once sung to the tune, celebrating a match at Newmarket between a mare called Duchess, belonging to the then Fenwick of Bywell, and a celebrated Newmarket racehorse. Tradition states that the north country horse won the race (which was run in heats), but with nothing to spare. We have heard the ballad sung by an old jockey about forty years ago (c. 1840), but it is now lost, and we can only recall to memory the first two lines—

***

Fenwick o' Bywell's off to Newmarket,

He'll be there or we get started.

***

The tune has a suspicious resemblance to the Irish air 'Garryowen,' but as played by Northumbrian pipers, it has sufficient individuality to entitle it to a place in this collection" (Bruce & Stokoe). Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 171.

X:1

T:Fenwick o’ Bywell

L:1/8

M:6/8

S:Bruce & Stokoe – Northumbrian Minstrelsy  (1882)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

g|edc BAB|GBG B2g|edc BAG|AfA c2g|

edc BAB|GBG B2G|c>de/f/ gdB|AgA c2:|

|:e|GGd BBg|GGd B2g|GGd BBg|AgA c2e|

GGd BBg|GGd B2G|c>de/f/ gdB|AgA c2:|

                       

FEOCHAN, AN (Gentle Breeze). Irish, Air. The tune was composed by fiddler Tommy Peoples. Green Linnet SIF-1095, Altan - "Horse with a Heart" (1989).

X:1

T:An Feochán

T:The Gentle Breeze

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Frankie Kennedy recording

R:Air

D:Altan - Horse with a Heart

Z:K. Gow

K:Em

E>F G/2E/2-E| {A}B2{^c/2B/2}A>B| G/2E/2-E d2| B/2^c/2d B/2c/2d| e>f d>f|!

e3 B| g>B f>B| e<B g>f| e<B BA| G>B F>B| E4:|!

ee- ed/2B/2|  b/2^a/2b- b2| ee- ed/2B/2| d2- de/2f/2| e2 {f/2e/2} dB|!

g>B f>B|e>f ed| B/2^c/2d- d>e| E/2F/2G- Ge|B(4c/2B/2A/2G/2 F>B|EE- E2||!

B|EF G>B|E>^cd2|

W:These two measures (and pickup) are to be

W:substituted for the first two measures

W:the second time through  the tune on the

W:repeated "A" part .

                       


FEOITNE FRAOC. AKA and see "The Heather Breeze."

                       

FERGAL O’GARA. Irish, Reel. See "Farrell O'Gara('s Reel).Intrepid Records, Michael Coleman - “The Heyday of Michael Coleman” (1973).

                       

FERGAL’S FLING. Irish, Hornpipe. C Major. Standard tuning. AABB. McGuire & Keegan (Irish Tunes by the 100, vol. 1), 1975; No. 79, pg. 21.

                       

FERGAL’S TRIP TO HERSCHEL. Australian, Reel. A Minor. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. A modern tune composed by Peter Holmes.

X:1

T:Fergal's Trip to Herschel

R:reel

C:Peter Holmes

Z:Andrew Le Blanc

M:4/4

L:1/8

Q:100

K:Am

||:e2ce Aece | a^gaf ecAc | B2GB dBGB |cBcd e^def| e2^de ceAe |

a^gaf e^de^f|~g3e dBGB |1 cBdB A4:|2 cBdB A^GAB||

~c3d ~e3^d | efed cBcd | ~B3c d3e | dcBA G4 | ~F3G ~A3 ^G|

A_BAG FEFG | E2 EF EDCB, |1A,B,CD E^GAB:|2 A,B,CB, A,4 ||

                       

FERGUS McIVOR. Scottish, Country Dance Tune (6/8 time). A favorite Scots country dance tune that is properly in the class of tunes called Scotch jigs.

                                   

FERGUS REEL. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AA’BB’. There was a Fergus Céilí Band, Clarecastle, in the 1950’s and 1960’s, whose members included flute player and fiddler John Joe Casey (b. 1912), accordion player Joe Sheridan and later accordion player John McCarthy. This tune was composed by Casey in 1960 for the All-Ireland Fleadh in Boyle, County Roscommon, with which he won first prize. Source for notated version: John Joe Casey [Treoir]. Treoir, 1970. Treoir, vol. 32, No. 3, 2000; pg. 14.

X:1

T:Fergus Reel

R:Reel

L:1/8

M:4/4

K:D

fd~d2 edcA|BGEF GBAG|1 F3A G3B|ABde gbag:|2 F3A G3B|Adag fdd2|

|:fd~d2 fdfa|ge(3.e.e.e gebe|1 fdAF G2AG|FAdf gbag:|2 fdAF G2AG|F2ag fdd2||

                       

FERGUSON'S RANT. Irish (originally?), Hornpipe. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. O'Neill (O’Neill’s Irish Music), 1915; No. 370, pg. 178.

X:1

T:Ferguson’s Rant

M:C

L:1/8

R:Honrpipe

S:O’Neill – O’Neill’s Irish Music (1915)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:G

dc | B2 AG DGBG | FAdA DGBG | B2 AG DGBG | B2 A2A2 dc | BGDG cAFA |

dBGB ecAc | gfed cBAd | B2G2G2 :: ga | bgdg Bdgd | gdBg BdgB | cedc BGdB |

c2 BA A2 dc | BGDG cAFA | cBGB ecAf | gfed BdAd | B2G2G2 :|

                       

FERINTOSH. See "Ferintosh Whiskey."

                       

FERINTOSH WHISKEY (An Toiseachd). Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard tuning. AB (Fraser, Hunter): AA'BB' (Athole). Ferintosh was once a very popular Scotch whiskey, especially in the 18th century, though it apparently is not made in modern times. "This air celebrates the district of Ferintosh, so famous for the production of the genuine Highland beverage, called whisky. The superiority of the quality produced arose from the privilege of distilling duty free,‑‑a privilege which the government found it necessary to purchase from Mr. Forbes of Culloden, the proprietor, when the revenue from excise became of such immense importance" (Fraser). Ferintosh is between Culbokie and Muir of Ord on the Black Isle, just north of Inverness. Charles Gore reports that Johnston's Gazetteer of Scotland describes Ferintosh as: "A Hamlet 3 m. NE of Conon Bridge, Ross & Cromarty,” and points out this is only six or seven miles from the world-famous Glenmorangie Distillery. There is still a distillery in Muir of Ord. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 91, pg. 35. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 98. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 49 (appears as “Ferrintosh”). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 103.

X:1

T:Ferintosh

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

B:Stewart-Robertson – The Athole Collection  (1884)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A,<D D/D/D F>DD>F|G>EC>A, =C/D/E G2|1 A,<D D/D/D F>DD>c|

d>AF>D F/G/A d2:|2 f>d c/d/e B>G F/G/A|G>EC>A, D2D||

g|:f>d f/g/a f<d d>f|g>ec>A =c/d/e g2|1 f>d f/g/a f<d d>g|f>da>f b>g a2:|2

f>d c/d/e B>G F/G/A|G>EC>A, D2D||

                       

FERMANAGH CURVES, THE. Irish, Jig. Composed by County Fermanagh flute player and singer Cathal McConnell, but named by the Scottish concertina player Simon Thoumire, who also recorded it. Compass 7 4287 2, Cathal McConnell – “Long Expectant Comes at Last” (2000).

                       

FERMANAGH GOLD RING. AKA and see “The Gold Ring [1].”

           

FERMANAGH HIGHLAND. Irish, Highland. A variant of "Moneymusk." Green Linnet GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned in County Fermanagh from the playing of Mick Hoy, Gabriel McArdle and Seamus Quinn).

                       

FERMANAGH QUICKSTEP. AKA and see "The McCarthy March," "The Lady in the Boat," "Bugle Horn," “Bugle Horn Quickstep,” "The Gettysburg March" (Pa.). Irish, Jig. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Jarman, pg. 65. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 4; No. 200, pg. 23.

X:1

T:Fermanagh Quickstep

M:9/8

L:1/8

R:March

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 4, No. 200 (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A|dfA d2A|dfA d2f|a2f d2f|fee e2A|dfA d2A|dfA d2e|f2f ede|(d3 d2):|

|:e|f3 gfg|a3 f2a|agg gff|fee efg|f3 gfg|a2f d2f|efg fge|edd d2:|

                       


FERMOY LASSES, THE (Na Cailinide Ua Feara-Muige). AKA and see "The Connaght Ranger(s)," "The Humors of Mackin." Irish, Reel. E Minor ('A' part) & G Major ('B' part). Standard tuning. AB (Mitchell, Shields/Goodman): AA'B (O'Neill): AABB (Flaherty, Mallinson, O’Malley, Perlman): AA’BB (Moylan). Fermoy is in County Cork. The earliest appearance of the tune in print is in Church of Ireland cleric James Goodman’s mid-19th century manuscripts, appearing as an untitled reel. Goodman (1828-1896) was an uilleann piper, and an Irish speaker who collected locally in County Cork and elsewhere in Munster, although he also obtained tunes from manuscripts and printed sources. The reel was remembered by Kilmaley, County Clare, fiddler, flute player and uilleann piper Peader O’Loughlin as one of the tunes he listened to his father, a flute player, play in the 1930’s. “’Twas a very simple, beautiful version of it, you know. Some of the tunes that are played today, you’d hear the difference, they’re not the same. And d’you know, the more that you hear you might say they’re not improved either” (Blooming Meadows, 1998, pg.170). Luke O’Malley says: “For years in New York this was called the ‘Leitrim Thrush [2]’.” Sources for notated versions: piper and flute player Charlie Lavin (b. 1940, Cloonshanville, near Frenchpart, County Roscommon) [Flaherty]; accordion player Johnny O’Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border), recorded at Na Piobairi Uilleann, October, 1984 [Moylan]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Louise Arsenault (b. 1956, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island; now resides in Wellington) [Perlman]; New York fiddler John McGrath (1900-1955, originally from County Mayo) [O’Malley]. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 150. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 7, pg. 3. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 16, pg. 38. Moylan (Johnny O’Leary), 1994; No. 142, pg. 83. O’Malley (Luke O’Malley’s Collection of Irish Music, vol. 1), 1976; No. 60, pg. 30 (appears as “Fermoy Lassies”). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 116. O'Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903/1979; No. 1310, pg. 246. O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 573, pg. 105. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 112. Shields/Goodman (Tunes of the Munster Pipers), 1998; No. 87, pg. 38 (appears as an untitled reel). Gael-Linn Records 78 RPM, Tommy Reck (c. 1957). Globestyle Irish CDORBD 085, Billy Clifford - “The Rushy Mountain” (1994. A reissue CD of Topic recordings from Sliabh Luachra musicians). Wild Asparagus WA 003, Wild Asparagus - "Tone Roads" (1990).

See also listings at:

Alan Snyder’s Cape Breton Fiddle Recording Index

Jane Keefer’s Folk Music Index: An Index to Recorded Sources 

Alan Ng’s Irishtune.info

X:1

T:Fermoy Lasses

M:4/4

L:1/8

R:Reel

K:E Minor

BA|GE~E2 BE~E2|GE~E2 B2BA|GE~E2 BE~E2|AFDF ACBA|

GE~E2 BE~E2|GE~E2 B2BA|~G2GB d2dB|AFDF A2BA:|

|:G2BG dGBA|

G2 Bd efg2| G2BG dGBG|AFDF A2BA|

G2BG dGBA|G2 Bd efg2|gage dedB|AFDF A2BA:|

X:2

T:Untitled Reel No. 87

T:Fermoy Lasses

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Reel

S:James Goodman manuscripts (mid-19th century)

K:E Minor

A|(GE)E2 (BE)E2|GEGA B2 (BA)|(GE)E2 (BE)E2|(FD)(FG) A2 AF|

(GE)E2 (BE)E2|(GF)(GA) (BcBA)|GABc d2 dB|AFDF A2 z||A|

G2 BG d2 BA|G2 Bd ef g2|G2 BG d2 cB|AFDF AcBA|

G2 BG d2 BA|G2 Bd ef g2|gage dedB|AFDF A2 z||

                       

FERN’S ROLLING PIN. A tune similar to “Victory Reel,” in the repertoire of Champion, central New York State fiddler Winifred “Murph” Baker.

                       

FERRIE REEL (Fairy Reel). Shetland, Reel. Shetland, Island of Yell. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. According to Tom Anderson (1978) the tune was one of the Yell tunes that were revived and played by Bobbie Jamieson and Willie Barclay Henderson. He identifies it as a trowie (troll) tune which tradition has it as heard emanating from a hole in the ground by a fiddler returning from performing at a wedding. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 112, pg. 73. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson ‑ "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

                       

FERRINTOSH. See “Ferintosh Whiskey.”

                       

FERRY [1], THE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 4; No. 74, pg. 10.

X:1

T:Ferry, The [1]

M:C

L:1/8

R:Strathspey

S:Kerr – Merry Melodies, vol. 4, pg. 74  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

d>A B/A/G/F/ F<A A<B|d>A B/A/G/F/ E<e e<f|d>A B/A/G/F/ A<A f>e|d/c/B/A/d>F F<E E<A:|

|:d>e f/e/d/c/ d>AF>A|d>e f/e/d/c/ B2 B<e|d>ef>d e>fd>A|B/c/d/c/ B/A/G/F/ F<E E<F:|

 

FERRY [2], THE. Scottish, Jig. A Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), vol. 4; No. 264, pg. 28.

X:1

T:Ferry, The [2]

M:6/8

L:1/8

R:Jig

S:Merry Melodies, vol. 4, No. 264  (c. 1880’s)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:A

cBc Ace|f3 efg|a2c cBA|cBB Bed|cBc Ace|f3 efg|a2c BAB|(A3 A)(ed):|

|:cea aga|fdf agf|e2c cBA|cBB Bed|cBc Ace|f3 efg|a2c BAB|(A3 A)(ed):|

                       

FERRY BRIDGE HORNPIPE. English (originally), Canadian; Hornpipe. England, Yorkshire. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. The Ferrybridge is the name of a span in Yorkshire, note Merryweather & Seattle. The tune appears in Cole’s 1000 and its predecessor, Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883), “as performed by” J. Hand. New York City writer, musician and researcher Don Meade believes this refers to one of two brothers, John and James Hand, who were fiddlers in the Massachusetts area in the mid-19th century. The tune was recorded by Cape Breton fiddle Winston Fitzgerald, paired with “Sumner’s Hornpipe,” which appears on the same page in Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883) just below “Ferry Bridge.” Meade also relates that the melody was recorded early in the 20th century by the Wyper Brothers, a melodeon-playing duo from Scotland. The tune became so associated with them that it acquired their name, and is often called “Wypers.” Sources for notated versions: an MS collection by fiddler Lawrence Leadley, 1827-1897 (Helperby, Yorkshire) [Merryweather & Seattle]; Peter Chaisson, Jr. (b. 1942, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 34, pg. 12. Cole (1000 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 95. Merryweather & Seattle (The Fiddler of Helperby), 1994; No. 27, pg. 35. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 79. Ryan’s Mammoth Collection, 1883; pg. 130. Rounder CD 11661-7033-2, Natalie MacMaster – “My Roots are Showing” (2000. Appears as “Ferry Bridge Clog”).

X:1

T:Ferry Bridge Hornpipe

M:C|

L:1/8

R:Hornpipe

S:Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (1883)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

(AG) | F>DA,>D F>Ad>A | G>FE>D C>EA>G | F>Ad>f g>fe>d | (3efe (3dcB (3ABA (3GFE |

F>DA,>D F>Ad>A | G>FE>D C>EA>G | F>Ad>f e>AB>c | d2f2d2 :: (AB) | c>de>f g>fg>e |

d>ef>g a>fd>f | g>fe>g f>ed>f | (3efe (3dcB (3ABA (3GFE | F<A,D>F A<DF>A |

G>FE>D C>EA>G | F>dA>F G>ge>c | d2f2d2 :|

           

FERRY MARCH.  English, March (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Source for notated version: the 1823-26 music mss of papermaker and musician Joshua Gibbons (1778-1871, of Tealby, near Market Rasen, Lincolnshire Wolds) [Sumner]. Sumner (Lincolnshire Collections, vol. 1: The Joshua Gibbons Manuscript), 1997; pg. 24.

           

FERRY STREET [1]. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler and composer Dan R. MacDonald (1911-1976). Cameron (Trip to Windsor), 1994; pg. 25. 

                       

FERRYBANK.  English, Waltz. G Major. Standard tuning. AABBCCDD. Kennedy (Fiddler’s Tune-Book: Slip Jigs and Waltzes), 1999; No. 121, pg. 29.

 


FESTIVAL DU VOYAGER REEL. Canadian, Reel. A Minor. Standard tuning. AABB. Composed by Marcel Meilleur of Winnipeg, Canada, who may or may not be of  Metis extraction (Meilleur’s sister Simone writes to emphatically deny that anyone in the family is Metis, maintaining: “This was a marketing ploy based on lies by my brother, my cousin David Dandeneau and Pemmican Publications Inc” (personal communication, 05/2005). Susan Songer (Portland Collection) notes that Meilleur played for 14 years as the backup fiddler for Manitoba fiddler Andy De Jarlis, and from 1976-1980 had a radio show on the CBC called Les Echoes de la Riviere Rouge. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 79 (another version, by Seattle fiddler Steve Trampe, appears in the appendix to the book).

                       

FESTIVAL REEL [1]. Canadian, Reel. Composed by Emile Benoit. Atlantica Music 02 77657 50222 26, Emile Benoit - “Atlantic Fiddles” (1994).

 

FESTIVAL REEL [2]. See “Reel du Festival.”

                       

FESTIVAL WALTZ. Bluegrass, Waltz. USA, Missouri. A Major. Standard tuning. AA (Brody): ABB' (Matthiesen). Composed (copyrighted 1972) by Kenny Baker, longtime fiddler for Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys. It has become a popular "contest" waltz, prone to embellishment. Source for notated version: Bo Bradham (Charlottesville, VA) [Matthiesen]. Brody (Fiddler’s Fakebook), 1983; pg. 103‑104. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pgs. 18-19. American Heritage 516, Jana Greif‑ "I Love Fiddlin.'"  County 736, Kenny Baker‑ "Kenny Baker Country." County 2705, Kenny Baker - "Master Fiddler." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Lyman Enloe (b. 1906, Mo.).  Rounder 0046, Mark O'Conner‑ "National Junior Fiddle Champion." Ruthie Dornfeld - "American Cafe Orchestra." Pete Jung & Bo Bradham- "Moving Clouds."

X:1

T:Festival Waltz

M:3/4

L:1/8

K:A

CB,|A,2C3E|G2F3E|F2G2A2|C4CB,|A,2C3E|G2F3E|F2D2C2|(B,4B,)A,|

B,2C2D2|E2F2G2|A2G3A|G4GF|E2B,3E|=C4E2|(C4C)D|C4CB,|

A,2C3E|G2F3E|F2G2A2|C4CB,|A,CEGAc|B4A2|a2f3A|f4AA|

a2f3A|a2=f3A|a2e2cB|A2E2GB|e4e2|c3dcB|(A4A)B|ABcd(3efg|

a3baf|g3age|f3gfe|c4ee|f2e2cB|A2c3e|e2d2B2|G4E2|

b2g3a|g2f2e2|b2g3a|g4gf|e2B3e|=c4e2|(c4c)d|c3Ace|

a3baf|g3age|f3gfe|c4AA|A2B2=c2|c3BA2|a2f3A|f4AA|

a2f3A|a2=f3A|a2e2cB|A2E2GB|e4e2|c3dcB|(A4A)B|A4|

                       

FESTUS BURKE. See “Sir Festus Burke.”

                       

FETE CHAMPETRE. AKA and see “The Corporation.” English, Jig. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. Published before 1730. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 32.

                       


FETLAR FOXTROT, THE. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning. AA'BCC'. From the island of Fetlar in the northern Shetlands. The foxtrot had been assimilated on Fetlar during the WWII era, but "only the name and the grosser features of the dance had been incorporated into the lacal dance tradition: it had been thoroughly 'Fetlarized'" (Cooke). Source for notated version: Sonny Bruce (Scalloway, Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 1, pg. 38.

                       

FETTE DE VILLAGE, LA. French, English; Country Dance Tune (2/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. AB. The name is taken from a stage work called La Fête du Village by Francois-Joseph Gossec, performed at the Paris Opera in 1778, then imported to London. Gossec is all-but-forgotten today, but was the originator of a richer style of orchestral writing, and introduced many standard reforms in the ordinary orchestral practice. In addition to the 1782 printing by James Aird, the melody was also published by Samuel, Ann and Peter Thompson in Compleat Collection of 200 Favourite Country Dances, vol. 4 (London, 1780, pg. 65) and Longman & Broderip’s Compleat Collection of 200 Favorite Country Dances (London, 1781, pg. 4). “Fette de Village” also appears in several 19th century English musicians’ manuscripts, including those of William Mittel (1799, New Romney, Kent), H.S.J. Jackson (1823, Wyresdale, Lancashire), Thomas Hammersley (1790, London), and FVWMLA (the last under the title “La Ball Elegante”). Aird (Selection), vol. II, 1782; No. 64, pg. 24. Callaghan (Hardcore English), 2007; pg. 35.

X:1

T:Fette de Village, La

M:2/4

L:1/8

S:Aird, vol. II, (1782)

Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

K:D

A2 {g}fe/f/ | gf e2 | fddd | e/d/c/B/ Af/g/ | a2 {g}fe/f/ | gf e2 |

fa de/c/ | d2d2 ||F/A/d/A/ G/B/d/B/ | F/A/d/A/ G/B/e/B/ | dagf |

e/d/e/f/ e2 | F/A/d/A/ F/A/d/A/ | G/B/d/B/ G/B/d/B/ | dfea | d2 d2 ||

                       

FETTERCAIRN REEL, THE. AKA and see "Newburn Lads." Scottish, Reel. The melody, with elaborations, appears in the Drummond Castle Manuscript (in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle), inscribed "A Collection of the best Highland Reels written by David Young, W.M. & Accomptant." Fettercairn, Aberdeenshire, is a village north of Brechin approached by a wooded valley along which MacBeth is believed to have retreated after his defeat at Dunsinane. It was the site of Kincardine Castle, whose history goes back to the 10th century. A turreted arch commemorating the 1861 visit of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert survives at the entrance to the village.

                       

FEUR GEARR, AN. AKA and see "The Short Grass."

                       

FEVEI FEVE TUNAL CHIE.  AKA and see “Grant’s Rant.”

                       

FEVER IN THE SOUTH. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB'. It is on Missouri fiddler Charlie Walden’s list of ‘100 essential Missouri fiddle tunes’. Vee Latty’s reworking of “Sally Ann.” Source for notated version: Vee Latty (Mo.) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 83. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Vee Latty (1910-1956) - "Fever in the South."

                                   

FEVER RIVER. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Ozark region. Recorded by collector Vance Randolph from the playing of Ozark region fiddler Lon Jordan.

                                   


FEW DAYS [1]. American, March (2/4 time). USA, southwestern Pa. D Major. Standard tuning. AB. A fife tune once popular in southwestern Pa. Bayard (1981) retells the legend about the origins of the tune, given to him by an informant, which begins in the last days of the Civil War. Lee's men had surrendered and the vast Union Army was standing down, but it took some time to process the orderly discharge of so many men. To prevent them from disbanding wholesale at the prospect of a long wait they were told by the command that they would be going home "in a few days."  As this line was repeatedly given for the continued delays it became a camp joke, and any fifer who composed a tune, if asked what he named it, said "Oh, A FEW DAYS." The real origins of the tune are in a pre‑civil war camp-meeting spiritual, says Bayard, which in southwestern Pa. went:

***

Our camps in the wilderness, a few days, a few days,

Our camps in the wilderness, and then we're going home.

***

He also says that "Quick Dutch," one of the traditional "Fife Duty" pieces from old fife tutors, may be an ancestor of this tune. Source for notate version: fifers Thomas Hoge (Greene County, Pa., 1951), Samuel Palmer (Greene and Fayette Counties, Pa., 1944), Marion Yoders (Greene County, Pa., 1960) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 154A‑C, pgs. 89‑90.

 

FEW DAYS [2]. AKA and see "Old Piss."

                       

FEY'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Peerie Hoose Ahunt the Burn, Da" (Shetland). English.

           

FFARWEL IR MARIAN.  Welsh, Air or Waltz. D Minor. Standard tuning. AAB.

X:1

T:Ffarwel Ir Marian

M:3/4

L:1/8

R:Air or Waltz

K:D Minor

A2|Ad A=B ^cd|e2 A4|fg fe de|^c2 A4|Ad AG AF|

Bd BA BG|FA F2 E2|D4:||D2|A2 c3 A|G2 A4|A2 c3 d|

e2 A4|f2g3 f|f2 e2 d2|ce c2 =B2|A4 A2|Ad A=B ^cd|

e2 A4|fg fe de|^c2 A4|Ad AG AF|Be BA BG|FA F2 E2|D4||

           

FHALLAING MHUIMHNEACH, AN. AKA and see “The Munster Cloak.”

                       

FHEARAIBH OG A'S CAILEAGAN. AKA and see "Merry Lads and Bonny Lasses."

                       

FHLEASGAICH OIG IS CEANALTA. Scottish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard tuning. One part. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), vol. 4, 1991; pg. 27.

                       

FHLIÚIT EABHAIR, AN. AKA and see “The Ivory Flute.”


                       

FHUAIR MAC SHIMI 'N OIGHREACHD. AKA and see "Lovat's Restoration."

                       

FHUISEOG AR AN TRÁ, AN. AKA and see “The Lark on the Strand [1].”

                                   

FHUISEOG ‘SA DUMHACH, AN. AKA and see “The Lark on the Strand.”

 

_______________________________

HOME       ALPHABETICAL FILES        REFERENCES

 

© 1996-2010 Andrew Kuntz

Please help maintain the viability of the Fiddler’s Companion on the Web by respecting the copyright.

For further information see Copyright and Permissions Policy or contact the author.

 

 

 

 


 [COMMENT1]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT2]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - On.

 [COMMENT3]This was Font/Pitch 1,10 - Off.

 [COMMENT4]Note:  The change to pitch (12) and font (1) must be converted manually.